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wheels36

The Right Ship Design For The Route.

21 posts in this topic

You are on back to back cruises on the same ship, the first goes south to the sun and the second goes north to the cold.

On the first you cannot get a sunbed but there is a lot of room in the bars, and no problem getting a seat in the bar at the front of the ship with the panoramic views.

On the second nobody wants the sunbeds and you never manage to get that window seat in the bar with the panoramic views.

Is there a case for ships to be designed for a particular route, with the ones dedicated to northern routes possibly ditching the swimming pools in favour of more bar space?

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Hi  An  interesting question, but I suspect you know that cruise ships are essentially designed for cruising in the sun, mostly the Caribbean and no cruise line is going to build a ship solely to cruise cool regions  for a few months of the year.  The exception is the small explorer ships which cruise Antarctica but the passengers who undertake these types of voyages are not looking for a conventional cruise ambience.  The problem is solved by adding a megadome over one of the swimming pools, meaning you can relax on sunlounger even on a cold rainy day.  I also think that you can always get a seat in the bars at anytime but not necessary in the area you wish, ie the obsevatory lounges are more likely to the full when it's raining.

wheels36 likes this

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You are on back to back cruises on the same ship, the first goes south to the sun and the second goes north to the cold.

On the first you cannot get a sunbed but there is a lot of room in the bars, and no problem getting a seat in the bar at the front of the ship with the panoramic views.

On the second nobody wants the sunbeds and you never manage to get that window seat in the bar with the panoramic views.

Is there a case for ships to be designed for a particular route, with the ones dedicated to northern routes possibly ditching the swimming pools in favour of more bar space?

 

Sums up life really Wheels, but I know where your going. wink.png

 

Just like I want to answer a few more questions here and I'm being called to breakfast.

 

Oh well.

wheels36 likes this

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I always wonder why cruise companies who have ships with undercover pools don't use them for the 'northern cruises' and the ones with all open air pools on summertime med cruises or based in the Caribbean for winter. to me it just seems logical. We have cruised north five times but only one ship had a undercover pool.

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I always wonder why cruise companies who have ships with undercover pools don't use them for the 'northern cruises' and the ones with all open air pools on summertime med cruises or based in the Caribbean for winter. to me it just seems logical. We have cruised north five times but only one ship had a undercover pool.

 

Hi  I assume it's because the senior office staff have been promoted above their ability to organise a p**s up in a brewery.

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You make a good point Wheels, however, I think the cruise lines will remain with their current designs at the moment as they offer diversity. Designing a ship solely for one cruise route would be highly appealing for a certain amount of time but then the novelty would wear off and passengers would look for something different again. By maintaining a variety of entertainment areas on board, they enable themselves to maneuver ships around the globe to follow demand. Take Royal Caribbean for example. Independence of the Seas sailed from Southampton for a long time but then they saw a drop in business on the ship as it was going to the same places year on year and customers clearly just wanted something different. Hence the idea to remove Independence for a year, replacing her with Anthem and then re-introducing the ship next year to freshen it up a little. The loss of that flexibility could severely hamper sales and therefore I cannot see ships being designed specifically for a single route other than the expedition ships mentioned above.

wheels36 likes this

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A reason I like the Aurora is because it has the flexible roof over the Crystal Pool. Going south it can be open fir the sun but going north then it is closed. Nice seating area with bar.

Aurora was the one ship with a covered pool that we cruised north on. The area was well used as it was early May, it was warm in port but sea days were a little chilly.

wheels36 likes this

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Hi  An  interesting question, but I suspect you know that cruise ships are essentially designed for cruising in the sun, mostly the Caribbean and no cruise line is going to build a ship solely to cruise cool regions  for a few months of the year.  The exception is the small explorer ships which cruise Antarctica but the passengers who undertake these types of voyages are not looking for a conventional cruise ambience.  The problem is solved by adding a megadome over one of the swimming pools, meaning you can relax on sunlounger even on a cold rainy day.  I also think that you can always get a seat in the bars at anytime but not necessary in the area you wish, ie the obsevatory lounges are more likely to the full when it's raining.

Yes, they are essentially designed for the sun and it is this aspect that I am suggesting needs a re-think. As the ships have got higher and the number of passengers has increased the top deck space ratio per passenger has decreased, and I think that it was you who pointed out in a previous post that the deck space ratio on river cruising ships was better than that of the cruise liners.

In our May cruise to the fjords on Azura in poor weather, and being averse to queueing or waiting, I never managed to get any kind of seat in the front lounge, and the bars were a "hell hole" when a football match was on.

My bar bill was certainly well reduced on what it would have been on a "designed for purpose" ship.

Land Ahoy likes this

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You make a good point Wheels, however, I think the cruise lines will remain with their current designs at the moment as they offer diversity. Designing a ship solely for one cruise route would be highly appealing for a certain amount of time but then the novelty would wear off and passengers would look for something different again. By maintaining a variety of entertainment areas on board, they enable themselves to maneuver ships around the globe to follow demand. Take Royal Caribbean for example. Independence of the Seas sailed from Southampton for a long time but then they saw a drop in business on the ship as it was going to the same places year on year and customers clearly just wanted something different. Hence the idea to remove Independence for a year, replacing her with Anthem and then re-introducing the ship next year to freshen it up a little. The loss of that flexibility could severely hamper sales and therefore I cannot see ships being designed specifically for a single route other than the expedition ships mentioned above.

I do not think it is designing for a single route as you can have a fjords or Baltic cruise say from several different embarkation ports, and you could still choose different routes on a wider global basis to suit the ship design.

Not sure that RC conforms to the normal cruise market as the "theme park" design arguably targets the easily bored market, where change is essential if market share is to be maintained.

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Im not sure where this thread is going. Aurora and, for that matter, Orinana were designed for round the world cruising and so the shape of their hulls was built differently to that of Oceana which was designed for the Caribbean. It is interesting that both the former ships have tiered stearns specialy for the sun but both also have large Crows Nests which are great in back weather as well as evenings. The reason this design was changed was because the need to increase cabin numbers and therefore profits. Unfortunately it also removs a considerable amount of outside sun bathing space. If a ship is designed for round the world then it is able to cover both north and south cruising so is ideal as it provides both insider and outside spaces. I think we should be going back to old designs to have a successful future on the ships.

Tally likes this

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Dont understand what you mean by "northern routes" we hace cruised to Norwegian Fjords, Icelan and Baltics and had very good weather  good enough to lie on deck on a sunbed. On our first Baltics the weather in St Petersburs was on the 80s and we cruised again to the Baltics this July and spent 2 fantastic days on deck sunbathing by the pool.

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Dont understand what you mean by "northern routes" we hace cruised to Norwegian Fjords, Icelan and Baltics and had very good weather  good enough to lie on deck on a sunbed. On our first Baltics the weather in St Petersburs was on the 80s and we cruised again to the Baltics this July and spent 2 fantastic days on deck sunbathing by the pool.

We cruised to 400 miles from north Pole although it was their warmest summer for decades it was less than 10 degrees the undercover pool would have been very welcome.

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Dont understand what you mean by "northern routes" we hace cruised to Norwegian Fjords, Icelan and Baltics and had very good weather  good enough to lie on deck on a sunbed. On our first Baltics the weather in St Petersburs was on the 80s and we cruised again to the Baltics this July and spent 2 fantastic days on deck sunbathing by the pool.

Keep packing your "Bermudas" then.

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On a World cruise of course you visit both hot countries and cold countries so you have this problem of the ship being packed inside when it's cold.  I like it when everyone is outside on their sunbeds.  I can always sit in peace and quiet on my balcony. As Captain Kidd said the Aurora having a roof which covers the Chrystal Pool in cold weather makes it ideal for cruising the World. 

Captain Kidd II likes this

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We cruised to 400 miles from north Pole although it was their warmest summer for decades it was less than 10 degrees the undercover pool would have been very welcome.

 

Yes but how often do cruiselines sail to 400 miles from the North Pole throughout a year very few cruises so therefore doesnt justify a ship being designed just for that small amount of cruises it wouldnt fbe financially viable.

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By traditional design I refer to ships that can sail anywhere in the world and not just north or south. Financially they make most sense as they can be switched between routes to meet demand. I also think a little and often is better than sending one super size ship less regularly as the customer can have a better choice of when and where they eant to cruise. In a way, ful marks to Fred O for the magical mystery cruise which changes dependent of the passengers wishes.

Tally likes this

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I went to Iceland on Artemis which had no covered pools and we were sunbathing in Iceland. It was hotter there than in Ireland. No matter where you go in the world the weather cannot be guaranteed so to have a particular type of ship to send to a particular type of area would not necessarily conform.  I also think that most ships these days have quite a lot of bar areas as they are designed to get as much money as possible out of the passengers mainly through the drinks route. 

 

I do agree that they should have more rear tiered ships that are more friendly than they ones that they are building.

Tally and Captain Kidd II like this

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I also went to the Arctic circle on the Oriana [but unlike her sister ship  Aurora she does not have a covered pool]   we  sunbathed   on open decks across the North sea  !! you just have to strike it lucky we had almost 14  days of  sunshine, but do agree that ships such as the Aurora and Ventura etc.should be used in northern climes . CG

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I agree with you Falmouth Girl, it certainly would be an advantage to use the ships with covered pools for the Northern routes, the only thing would possibly be the demand for these not being sufficient to support the likes of Ventura and also the smaller water channels further north,

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