Enquire Now

Home Cruises Auckland to Singapore Silver Shadow 2023-01-23

Auckland to Singapore - SS230123C39 Silver Shadow departing 23 Jan 2023

Call now 01246 819 819 to book

Silver Shadow
Ship
Cruise Line
Embark
23 Jan 2023
Duration
39 Nights
From / To
Auckland / Singapore
Ports of call
Auckland - Auckland - Bay of Islands - Vanuatu - Vanuatu

Suite from Call for fares

Enquire Now

Itinerary

Show sea days

Date Date
Location Location
 
In In
Out Out
Date 23/01/2023
Location Auckland
In
Out

Blending beachy recreation with all the delights of a modern, diverse and thoroughly multicultural city, Auckland sits on the lucid blue-green waters of New Zealand’s north island. Known as the ‘City of Sails’, its two harbours will tempt you with waterfront walks, and the chance to breathe fresh sea air deep into your lungs while absorbing spectacular views of Auckland’s grand harbour bridge’s span.

Take in the true scale of Auckland’s magnificent cityscape by ascending 192 metres to the Sky Tower, and looking out over the city’s gleaming silver towers, which reflect on the abundant waters below. Views over the bay and adjacent islands await, and you can share elegant cocktails at this dizzying height, above the mingling yachts of Viaduct Harbour. Immerse yourself in the rich history and culture of the area at Auckland Art Gallery, Toi o Tāmaki. Set beside tranquil fountains and handsomely landscaped flowerbeds of Albert Park, the French-Renaissance building houses New Zealand’s most extensive art collection, and exhibits works from Māori and Pacific artists. New Zealand is world-renowned for its captivating natural scenery, and day trips across the sparkling bays, to nearby islands like Waiheke, Tiritiri Matangi, and Rangitoto, are always tempting. Discover lava caves, grape-laden vineyards and flourishing wildlife in the Hauraki Gulf’s islands. You’ll also find an exceptional 360-degree panorama over the city, to the horizon beyond, from the heights of ancient Mount Eden. The spectacular dormant volcano rises improbably from a city suburb, and also lends its name to Eden Park – the unusual, translucent stadium of New Zealand’s mighty All Blacks.

Date 24/01/2023
Location Auckland
In
Out

Blending beachy recreation with all the delights of a modern, diverse and thoroughly multicultural city, Auckland sits on the lucid blue-green waters of New Zealand’s north island. Known as the ‘City of Sails’, its two harbours will tempt you with waterfront walks, and the chance to breathe fresh sea air deep into your lungs while absorbing spectacular views of Auckland’s grand harbour bridge’s span.

Take in the true scale of Auckland’s magnificent cityscape by ascending 192 metres to the Sky Tower, and looking out over the city’s gleaming silver towers, which reflect on the abundant waters below. Views over the bay and adjacent islands await, and you can share elegant cocktails at this dizzying height, above the mingling yachts of Viaduct Harbour. Immerse yourself in the rich history and culture of the area at Auckland Art Gallery, Toi o Tāmaki. Set beside tranquil fountains and handsomely landscaped flowerbeds of Albert Park, the French-Renaissance building houses New Zealand’s most extensive art collection, and exhibits works from Māori and Pacific artists. New Zealand is world-renowned for its captivating natural scenery, and day trips across the sparkling bays, to nearby islands like Waiheke, Tiritiri Matangi, and Rangitoto, are always tempting. Discover lava caves, grape-laden vineyards and flourishing wildlife in the Hauraki Gulf’s islands. You’ll also find an exceptional 360-degree panorama over the city, to the horizon beyond, from the heights of ancient Mount Eden. The spectacular dormant volcano rises improbably from a city suburb, and also lends its name to Eden Park – the unusual, translucent stadium of New Zealand’s mighty All Blacks.

Date 25/01/2023
Location Bay of Islands
In
Out

The Tasman Sea on the west and the Pacific Ocean on the east meet at the top of North Island at Cape Reinga. No matter what route you take, you’ll pass farms and forests, marvellous beaches, and great open spaces. The East Coast, up to the Bay of Islands, is Northland’s most densely populated, often with refugees from bigger cities—looking for a more relaxed life—clustered around breathtaking beaches. The first decision on the drive north comes at the foot of the Brynderwyn Hills.

Turning left will take you up the West Coast through areas once covered with forests and now used for either agricultural or horticulture. Driving over “the Brynderwyns,” as they are known, takes you to Whangarei, the only city in Northland. If you’re in the mood for a diversion, you can slip to the beautiful coastline and take in Waipu Cove, an area settled by Scots, and Laings Beach, where million-dollar homes sit next to small Kiwi beach houses. An hour’s drive farther north is the Bay of Islands, known all over the world for its beauty. There you will find lush forests, splendid beaches, and shimmering harbors. The Treaty of Waitangi was signed here in 1840 between Māoriand the British Crown, establishing the basis for the modern New Zealand state. Every year on February 6, the extremely beautiful Waitangi Treaty Ground (the name means weeping waters) is the sight of a celebration of the treaty and protests by Māori unhappy with it. Continuing north on the East Coast, the agricultural backbone of the region is even more evident and a series of winding loop roads off the main highway will take you to beaches that are both beautiful and isolated where you can swim, dive, picnic, or just laze. . The West Coast is even less populated, and the coastline is rugged and windswept. In the Waipoua Forest, you will find some of New Zealand’s oldest and largest kauri trees; the winding road will also take you past mangrove swamps. Crowning the region is the spiritually significant Cape Reinga, the headland at the top of the vast stretch of 90 Mile Beach, where it’s believed Māori souls depart after death. Today Māori make up roughly a quarter of the area’s population (compared with the national average of about 15%). The legendary Māori navigator Kupe was said to have landed on the shores of Hokianga Harbour, where the first arrivals made their home. Many different wi (tribes) lived throughout Northland, including Ngapuhi (the largest), Te Roroa, Ngati Wai, Ngati Kuri, Te Aupouri, Ngaitakoto, Ngati Kahu, and Te Rarawa. Many Māorihere can trace their ancestry to the earliest inhabitants

Date 26/01/2023
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 27/01/2023
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 28/01/2023
Location Vanuatu
In
Out

Vanuatu’s southernmost inhabited island, Aneityum, is a little tropical island paradise. The interior of the island is mountainous and covered with forest and exists at a slightly cooler climate than the rest of the island. Aneityum rests upon two coalescing volcanoes, although volcanic activity ceased long ago, during the late-Pleistocene to Holocene era. Along the coast, pine plantations contrast with coconut palms, white sand beaches and coral reefs.

Aneghowhat is the main settlement on the southwestern side of Aneityum, though it is a small and simple town, as the entire island only has a population of approximately 900 people.

Date 29/01/2023
Location Vanuatu
In
Out

As world famous beaches go, Champagne Beach is one of the big hitters. In 2003, CNN ranked it number nine in its list of top 100 beaches and independent travel specialists permanently include it on their list of 50 best beaches worldwide. It’s one of the world’s greatest natural beauties: picture-perfect beach white sand, turquoise water and nothing – save for the occasional cow or curious turtle – around.

With only coconut plantations and a few friendly locals to keep you company, this might just be the island of your dreams. The glorious name “Champagne Beach” was given to the island in the 17th century, when Pedro de Quirós believed he had reached the famous unknown southern land or the “Tierra Australis Incognita” (or Australia as we now know it). He believed the effervescent bubbles of volcanic origin that bubble up from the crystal clear waters were reminiscent of the bubbles of Champagne. Additionally, the coastline is shaped like an art deco Champagne saucer, so the name stuck! The beach is located on the largest yet least populated island in the 40-island Vanuatu archipelago, near the village of Hog Harbor on Espiritu Santo Island. If you want to venture beyond the beach, then Espiritu Santu is also famed for its blue holes. The island is home to some of the clearest waters on Earth, benefiting from natural filtering from underground limestone caves. Ride or paddle your way through emerald green rainforest amid the sound of birdsong for an experience that will make your soul sing.

Date 30/01/2023
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 31/01/2023
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 01/02/2023
Location Alotau
In
Out

Alotau is the provincial capital of the Milne Bay Province located in the southeast bay of Papua New Guinea. The town and surrounding area has been an important staging ground during World War II and we will see remains and memorials dating back or referring to the war. On a tour of the town, visitors will appreciate lovely vistas of the bay and experience the markets, which are frequented not only by locals, but also by islanders selling their products or looking for produce to take back into Milne Bay.

Alotau is an important port facility for the islands and attracts many vendors of handicrafts from different islands.

Date 02/02/2023
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 03/02/2023
Location Rabaul
In
Out

If surreal and unique experiences are your thing, then the Papua New Guinean town of Rabaul should tick your travel boxes. Found on the north eastern tip of New Britain Island (the largest island off mainland PNG) Rabaul, the former provincial capital, has quite a remarkable location. The town is inside the flooded caldera of a giant volcano and several sub-vents are still quite active today! The lively city was almost entirely devastated by Mount Tavurvur in 1994, covering the city in ashfall, but thankfully costing no lives. View less

Since then, thanks to Rabaul’s deep-water port, commerce has been on the up, and a few shops and hotels have managed to find an audience. However, Rabaul’s remote location together with the volcano still being one of the most active and dangerous in Papua New Guinea means tourism in not rife. Rabaul has an impressive WWII history which includes a 300-mile network of tunnels dug by Japanese POW designed to conceal munitions and stores. After the Pearl Harbour bombings, the Japanese used Rabaul as their South Pacific base for the last four years of WWII, and by 1943 there were about 110,000 Japanese troops based in Rabaul. Post war, the island was returned to Australia, before it was granted independence in 1975. It should be noted that patience is a virtue here. However, that is not all bad. The slow pace of transportation allows travellers to marvels at the quite astonishing landscape. Divers will also be richly rewarded – the marine life of the island is extraordinary.

Date 04/02/2023
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 05/02/2023
Location Madang
In
Out

The eastern half of the island of New Guinea – second largest in the world – was divided between Germany (north) and the UK (south) in 1885. The latter area was transferred to Australia in 1902, which occupied the northern portion during World War I and continued to administer the combined areas until independence in 1975. A nine-year secessionist revolt on the island of Bougainville ended in 1997 after claiming some 20,000 lives.

Date 06/02/2023
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 07/02/2023
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 08/02/2023
Location Koror
In
Out

Koror is the state comprising the main commercial centre of the Republic of Palau. It consists of several islands, the most prominent being Koror Island. The state of Koror contains about 65% of the population of the country.

Date 09/02/2023
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 10/02/2023
Location Kalanggamman Island
In
Out
Date 11/02/2023
Location Bohol (Tagbilaran), Philippines
In 08:00
Out 16:00

Bohol is an island province consisting of Bohol Island and 75 minor surrounding islands. Its capital is Tagbilaran City. With a land area of 1,589.7 sq mi and a coastline 162 mi, Bohol is the tenth largest island of the Philippines. In the 1600’s, the Jesuits introduced Christianity to the region. They built huge churches, which were declared heritage sites in the early 2000’s. Unfortunately most of these churches were heavily damaged by the 7.2 magnitude earthquake of 2013. Today, some of these churches are being restored.

Date 12/02/2023
Location Romblon Island
In
Out

Mesmerising, paradisical sands and sparkling waters create a truly stirring vision of Philippine beauty – dazzling visitors who head for Romblon Island’s charmed shores. With transient, natural bridges linking together pristine islands, and fine, jungle-clad beaches offering unspoiled tropical relaxation, Romblon Island is part of a staggeringly picturesque archipelago. Occupied by the Japanese in World War II, you can also dig into military history and local heritage while absorbing these precious vistas of visceral beauty. View less

There is high competition around here, but Bon Bon Beach is one of the island’s most celebrated stretches of sand – and a post-card perfect vision of pearly-white bliss. Crystal-clear water and soft, glowing sands await. A sandbar connects the beach with the small Bang-og Island, and as the tides recede, it’s possible to stroll out across to the lush, vegetation-cloaked island. Close by, other peaceful beaches like Tiamban Beach roll out lazily, providing sublime sanctuary for swimming, and lounging before layers of thick palms. The tempting water is transparent, and you can spot colourful fish dashing back and forth, just below the surface. The Fort San Andre is a link back through time to Romblon Island’s Spanish colonial heritage. Built by the Spaniards in the 17th century, climb its set of steep stairs to enjoy views over this heavenly island realm. Wait until later if you want to catch a violent sunset bursting across the skies from its chunky stone walls.

Date 13/02/2023
Location Manila
In
Out

The city sprawls eastward from Manila Bay. Its streets range from multi-lane boulevards to maze-like alleys. In this metropolis of 12 million, the contrast between spacious well-maintained elite communities like Forbes Park and overcrowded slum areas such as Tondo is immense. Occupied over the decades by the Spanish, Americans, British and Japanese, East now meets West, giving the city its unique character. The Walled City, a medieval fortified town, was the heart and soul of the country for more than 300 years. This city fortress, surrounded by moats and turreted walls 30 feet thick, was known as Intramuros. Only members of the Castilian upper class, friars, soldiers and government administrators were privileged to live inside the walls; natives had to live in the outlying boroughs.

Date 14/02/2023
Location Manila
In
Out 19:00

The city sprawls eastward from Manila Bay. Its streets range from multi-lane boulevards to maze-like alleys. In this metropolis of 12 million, the contrast between spacious well-maintained elite communities like Forbes Park and overcrowded slum areas such as Tondo is immense. Occupied over the decades by the Spanish, Americans, British and Japanese, East now meets West, giving the city its unique character. The Walled City, a medieval fortified town, was the heart and soul of the country for more than 300 years. This city fortress, surrounded by moats and turreted walls 30 feet thick, was known as Intramuros. Only members of the Castilian upper class, friars, soldiers and government administrators were privileged to live inside the walls; natives had to live in the outlying boroughs.

Date 15/02/2023
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 16/02/2023
Location Hong Kong
In
Out

A spectacular, serrated skyline of soaring towers and neon lights, Hong Kong is a vibrant, immersive metropolis and cultural hub. Dramatic harbour-front light shows transform the waterfront’s gleaming buildings into a colourful canvas – best seen from the Star Ferry, when the Symphony of Lights blares into life each evening. A city where future and tradition collides – perhaps best illustrated by the skyscrapers that feature gaping holes, designed to allow spirit dragons to soar from the hills to the waterfront unimpeded. View less

Wander flowing shopping streets, wade through sprawling markets and soak up the neon glory of this one-of-a-kind city – which continues to reach for the sky. Hong Kong’s dense jumble of activity is one of its main appeals, but once you’ve felt the thrill of rising to towering observation decks, to see the soaring city from above, it’s surprisingly easy to find peace among Hong Kong’s intense urban wonders. Victoria Peak is the highest point and it offers staggering views down over the city and harbour. The Peak Tram funicular can ferry you to the top, to the vantage point which was historically adored by the rich for the cooler air found here, away from the busy bustle of the city streets. Many elaborate temples add a tranquil element to Hong Kong’s whirr, and Tin Hau temple has a surprisingly urban location, considering its dedication to the Goddess of the Sea. It did once occupy the shorefront, but the city’s growth saw land reclaimed from the sea around it, leaving the temple marooned inland. Having been leased to the British for 99 years, milky tea is a revered tradition here – enjoy your cup with a serving of local dim sum.While it’s easy to think all the bright lights are the sum of today’s Hong Kong, you need only walk or board a tram for the short jaunt west into Western to discover a side of Hong Kong that is more traditionally Chinese but no less high-energy. You’ll discover the real Hong Kong to the east of Central, too, in Wan Chai, Causeway Bay, and beyond. Amid the residential towers are restaurants, shopping malls, bars, convention centers, a nice smattering of museums, and—depending on fate and the horse you wager on—one of Hong Kong’s luckiest or unluckiest spots, the Happy Valley Racecourse. Kowloon sprawls across a generous swath of the Chinese mainland across Victoria Harbour from Central. Tsim Sha Tsui, at the tip of Kowloon peninsula, is packed with glitzy shops, first-rate museums, and eye-popping views of the skyline across the water. Just to the north are the teeming market streets of Mong Kok and in the dense residential neighborhoods beyond, two of Hong Kong’s most enchanting spiritual sights, Wong Tai Sin Temple and Chi Lin Nunnery. As you navigate this huge metropolis (easy to do on the excellent transportation network), keep in mind that streets are usually numbered odd on one side, even on the other. There’s no baseline for street numbers and no block-based numbering system, but street signs indicate building numbers for any given block.

Date 17/02/2023
Location Hong Kong
In
Out

A spectacular, serrated skyline of soaring towers and neon lights, Hong Kong is a vibrant, immersive metropolis and cultural hub. Dramatic harbour-front light shows transform the waterfront’s gleaming buildings into a colourful canvas – best seen from the Star Ferry, when the Symphony of Lights blares into life each evening. A city where future and tradition collides – perhaps best illustrated by the skyscrapers that feature gaping holes, designed to allow spirit dragons to soar from the hills to the waterfront unimpeded. View less

Wander flowing shopping streets, wade through sprawling markets and soak up the neon glory of this one-of-a-kind city – which continues to reach for the sky. Hong Kong’s dense jumble of activity is one of its main appeals, but once you’ve felt the thrill of rising to towering observation decks, to see the soaring city from above, it’s surprisingly easy to find peace among Hong Kong’s intense urban wonders. Victoria Peak is the highest point and it offers staggering views down over the city and harbour. The Peak Tram funicular can ferry you to the top, to the vantage point which was historically adored by the rich for the cooler air found here, away from the busy bustle of the city streets. Many elaborate temples add a tranquil element to Hong Kong’s whirr, and Tin Hau temple has a surprisingly urban location, considering its dedication to the Goddess of the Sea. It did once occupy the shorefront, but the city’s growth saw land reclaimed from the sea around it, leaving the temple marooned inland. Having been leased to the British for 99 years, milky tea is a revered tradition here – enjoy your cup with a serving of local dim sum.While it’s easy to think all the bright lights are the sum of today’s Hong Kong, you need only walk or board a tram for the short jaunt west into Western to discover a side of Hong Kong that is more traditionally Chinese but no less high-energy. You’ll discover the real Hong Kong to the east of Central, too, in Wan Chai, Causeway Bay, and beyond. Amid the residential towers are restaurants, shopping malls, bars, convention centers, a nice smattering of museums, and—depending on fate and the horse you wager on—one of Hong Kong’s luckiest or unluckiest spots, the Happy Valley Racecourse. Kowloon sprawls across a generous swath of the Chinese mainland across Victoria Harbour from Central. Tsim Sha Tsui, at the tip of Kowloon peninsula, is packed with glitzy shops, first-rate museums, and eye-popping views of the skyline across the water. Just to the north are the teeming market streets of Mong Kok and in the dense residential neighborhoods beyond, two of Hong Kong’s most enchanting spiritual sights, Wong Tai Sin Temple and Chi Lin Nunnery. As you navigate this huge metropolis (easy to do on the excellent transportation network), keep in mind that streets are usually numbered odd on one side, even on the other. There’s no baseline for street numbers and no block-based numbering system, but street signs indicate building numbers for any given block.

Date 18/02/2023
Location Hong Kong
In
Out 19:00

A spectacular, serrated skyline of soaring towers and neon lights, Hong Kong is a vibrant, immersive metropolis and cultural hub. Dramatic harbour-front light shows transform the waterfront’s gleaming buildings into a colourful canvas – best seen from the Star Ferry, when the Symphony of Lights blares into life each evening. A city where future and tradition collides – perhaps best illustrated by the skyscrapers that feature gaping holes, designed to allow spirit dragons to soar from the hills to the waterfront unimpeded. View less

Wander flowing shopping streets, wade through sprawling markets and soak up the neon glory of this one-of-a-kind city – which continues to reach for the sky. Hong Kong’s dense jumble of activity is one of its main appeals, but once you’ve felt the thrill of rising to towering observation decks, to see the soaring city from above, it’s surprisingly easy to find peace among Hong Kong’s intense urban wonders. Victoria Peak is the highest point and it offers staggering views down over the city and harbour. The Peak Tram funicular can ferry you to the top, to the vantage point which was historically adored by the rich for the cooler air found here, away from the busy bustle of the city streets. Many elaborate temples add a tranquil element to Hong Kong’s whirr, and Tin Hau temple has a surprisingly urban location, considering its dedication to the Goddess of the Sea. It did once occupy the shorefront, but the city’s growth saw land reclaimed from the sea around it, leaving the temple marooned inland. Having been leased to the British for 99 years, milky tea is a revered tradition here – enjoy your cup with a serving of local dim sum.While it’s easy to think all the bright lights are the sum of today’s Hong Kong, you need only walk or board a tram for the short jaunt west into Western to discover a side of Hong Kong that is more traditionally Chinese but no less high-energy. You’ll discover the real Hong Kong to the east of Central, too, in Wan Chai, Causeway Bay, and beyond. Amid the residential towers are restaurants, shopping malls, bars, convention centers, a nice smattering of museums, and—depending on fate and the horse you wager on—one of Hong Kong’s luckiest or unluckiest spots, the Happy Valley Racecourse. Kowloon sprawls across a generous swath of the Chinese mainland across Victoria Harbour from Central. Tsim Sha Tsui, at the tip of Kowloon peninsula, is packed with glitzy shops, first-rate museums, and eye-popping views of the skyline across the water. Just to the north are the teeming market streets of Mong Kok and in the dense residential neighborhoods beyond, two of Hong Kong’s most enchanting spiritual sights, Wong Tai Sin Temple and Chi Lin Nunnery. As you navigate this huge metropolis (easy to do on the excellent transportation network), keep in mind that streets are usually numbered odd on one side, even on the other. There’s no baseline for street numbers and no block-based numbering system, but street signs indicate building numbers for any given block.

Date 19/02/2023
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 20/02/2023
Location Hanoi (Ha Long Bay)
In 08:00
Out

Hạ Long Bay, in northeast Vietnam, is known for its emerald waters and thousands of towering limestone islands topped by rainforests. Junk boat tours and sea kayak expeditions take visitors past islands named for their shapes, including Stone Dog and Teapot islets.

Date 21/02/2023
Location Hanoi (Ha Long Bay)
In
Out 12:30

Hạ Long Bay, in northeast Vietnam, is known for its emerald waters and thousands of towering limestone islands topped by rainforests. Junk boat tours and sea kayak expeditions take visitors past islands named for their shapes, including Stone Dog and Teapot islets.

Date 22/02/2023
Location Chan May (Hue/Da Nang)
In 07:00
Out 19:00

Experience the rich imperial past, stoic resilience, and blissful beaches of central Vietnam, as you delve deep into this fascinating country’s past and present. The sheer beauty and vitality of the scenery will amaze you, as you explore the stories this now tranquil land has to tell – all the while surrounded by rolling rice paddies, freely grazing water buffalo and soaring limestone scenery. Cut in half by the evocatively named Perfume River, and home to a spectacular sprawling citadel, Hue is a true experience for the senses.

Vietnam’s timeless beauty outshines the shadows of its past, but Hue still bears the heavy scars of war – whether it’s from American bombs, or harrowing events like those of Hue Jungle Crevice – where the Viet Cong pushed 3,000 civilians to their deaths. Hue’s Old City was once the jewel of Vietnam, standing proudly as its Imperial Capital. Lotus flowers now twirl peacefully in the grand moat around its mighty walls, which encase a spectacular array of charred palaces, temples and regal residences. Danang’s Marble Mountains rise dramatically close by, and they are scattered with Buddhist shrines and plunging caves. While there is an endless treasure trove of rich cultural experiences waiting here, it’s hard to resist the call of Danang’s idyllic beaches, where white sand gives way to a fringe of palm trees. The undulating humps of the city’s Dragon Bridge soar across the wide River Han, and this ambitious structure comes alive at night, when strobing light shows illuminate its flowing form, and the bridge’s dragon head rasps fire into the dusk.

Date 23/02/2023
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 24/02/2023
Location Phu My (Ho Chi Minh Ciity)
In 08:00
Out

A chaotic, enchanting swirl of sensory stimulation – Ho Chi Minh City is a place of incense-infused temples, colonial architecture, warm people and delicious street food. Formerly known as Saigon, the city was affectionately-labelled the Pearl of the Orient by the French. Afternoons here drift by lazily on the gentle chaos of the River Saigon, as taxi boats and motor canoes flit up and down, and parks fill out with locals playing jianzi, kicking shuttlecocks back and forth. View less

The French colonial imprint is evidenced in the Saigon Notre Dame Basilica, which stands out with its grand double bell towers and red brick hue. Just across the road, you’ll also find the celebrated Ho Chi Minh Post office, which was erroneously credited as a Gustav Eifel creation. In reality, the architect was another Frenchman, Alfred Foulhoux. The French also caffeinated this city with coffee culture, and a refreshing iced coffee, from the innumerable coffee shops, will perk you up instantly. Taste the street food to get under Ho Chi Minh City’s skin, with humble restaurants serving up rich flavours – from the Vietnamese take on the baguette, a banh mi sandwich – to the local staple of pho, a delicious noodle soup. The Tortoise pagoda is a tranquil escape and a serene place of worship for Vietnamese who practice Buddhism and Taoism, while the Vietnamese medical museum has a fascinating collection of remedies and potions – some dating back to Stone Age. Journey out to learn more of the Vietnam War at the Remnants Museum and Cu Chi tunnels. Offering a vivid glimpse of conditions, and the ingenuity and resilience of the soldiers, you’ll learn of the guerrilla war campaign raged from within this claustrophobic, 70-mile network of war tunnels.

Date 25/02/2023
Location Phu My (Ho Chi Minh Ciity)
In
Out 13:00

A chaotic, enchanting swirl of sensory stimulation – Ho Chi Minh City is a place of incense-infused temples, colonial architecture, warm people and delicious street food. Formerly known as Saigon, the city was affectionately-labelled the Pearl of the Orient by the French. Afternoons here drift by lazily on the gentle chaos of the River Saigon, as taxi boats and motor canoes flit up and down, and parks fill out with locals playing jianzi, kicking shuttlecocks back and forth. View less

The French colonial imprint is evidenced in the Saigon Notre Dame Basilica, which stands out with its grand double bell towers and red brick hue. Just across the road, you’ll also find the celebrated Ho Chi Minh Post office, which was erroneously credited as a Gustav Eifel creation. In reality, the architect was another Frenchman, Alfred Foulhoux. The French also caffeinated this city with coffee culture, and a refreshing iced coffee, from the innumerable coffee shops, will perk you up instantly. Taste the street food to get under Ho Chi Minh City’s skin, with humble restaurants serving up rich flavours – from the Vietnamese take on the baguette, a banh mi sandwich – to the local staple of pho, a delicious noodle soup. The Tortoise pagoda is a tranquil escape and a serene place of worship for Vietnamese who practice Buddhism and Taoism, while the Vietnamese medical museum has a fascinating collection of remedies and potions – some dating back to Stone Age. Journey out to learn more of the Vietnam War at the Remnants Museum and Cu Chi tunnels. Offering a vivid glimpse of conditions, and the ingenuity and resilience of the soldiers, you’ll learn of the guerrilla war campaign raged from within this claustrophobic, 70-mile network of war tunnels.

Date 26/02/2023
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 27/02/2023
Location Bangkok (Laem Chabang)
In
Out

Bangkok, also known as the City of Angels and Venice of the East thrills with energy. There’s such a vast array of sightseeing, shopping, and eating possibilities that you’ll have little time to rest. When you do find a moment, pamper yourself with spa treatments, skyline-view bars, luxurious hotels, and excellent restaurants. The city is a mesmerizing blend of old and new, East and West, and dizzying contradictions.

Temples and red-light districts, languid canals and permanent gridlock, streetside vendors and chic upscale eateries, all make their home together, all at the same time. Bangkok rarely fails to make an impression, and yes, you might need to go spend a few days on the beach to recover from it all. Although Bangkok is not known for jaw-dropping tourist attractions, it does have an endless supply of worthwhile pilgrimages. The Grand Palace, Wat Phra Kaew, and the Emerald Buddha are tops on every visitor’s itinerary, and lesser-known temples, such as Wat Benjamabophit, the golden stupa of Wat Sakhet, and Wat Suthat, are all worthy of a stop. Besides temples, there are plenty of other interesting niches and touring possibilities to fit just about every interest. Take in a venom extraction and python feeding show at the Queen Saowapha Snake Farm, or go to the nearby Jim Thompson House to learn all about the famed Thai silk industry. If architecture is your forte, there is the Suan Pakkard Palace with its antique teak house collection, and the even more astounding Vimanmek Palace, which contains the world’s largest golden teak building. Bangkok’s Chinatown merits at least a day on every travel itinerary—be sure to check out the sprawling labyrinthine Flower and Thieves markets. Thai food is unrivaled for spice, taste, and variation. From multicourse meals to small street vendors, the one constant here is fresh and delicious at every level. You can have superlative roast duck or wonton noodles on a street corner for lunch and then be dining on world-class chef creations in the Oriental or Shangri-La hotels for supper. It doesn’t have to be all spicy Thai either, as Bangkok is home to excellent French, Italian, and other world cuisines, and you need a few years just to make a dent in all the options that are available. The Old City is a major destination for travelers, as it’s home to opulent temples like Wat Po and Wat Phra Kaew. Across the river is Thonburi, a mostly residential neighborhood, where you can find Wat Arun. At the northern tip of the Old City is Banglamphu, one of Bangkok’s older residential neighborhoods. It’s best known now for Khao San Road, a backpacker hangout, though the neighborhood has much more to offer, especially when it comes to street food. North of Banglamphu is Dusit, the royal district since the days of Rama V. East of the Old City is Chinatown, a labyrinth of streets with restaurants, shops, and warehouses. Farther down the Chao Phraya River is bustling Silom Road, one of the city’s major commercial districts. Patpong, the city’s most famous of several red-light districts, is also here. Bang Rak is home to some of the city’s leading hotels: the Mandarin Oriental, the Peninsula, the Royal Orchid Sheraton, and the Shangri-La. To the north of Rama IV Road is Bangkok’s largest green area, Lumphini Park. Continue north and you reach Sukhumvit Road, once a residential area. More recently, Thong Lor, farther east along Sukhumvit, has become the “in” neighborhood for those want to see and be seen. The Nana and Asok areas of Sukhumvit are now home to the even busier red-light entertainment districts (Nana and Soi Cowboy) than Patpong.

Date 28/02/2023
Location Bangkok (Laem Chabang)
In
Out 18:00

Bangkok, also known as the City of Angels and Venice of the East thrills with energy. There’s such a vast array of sightseeing, shopping, and eating possibilities that you’ll have little time to rest. When you do find a moment, pamper yourself with spa treatments, skyline-view bars, luxurious hotels, and excellent restaurants. The city is a mesmerizing blend of old and new, East and West, and dizzying contradictions.

Temples and red-light districts, languid canals and permanent gridlock, streetside vendors and chic upscale eateries, all make their home together, all at the same time. Bangkok rarely fails to make an impression, and yes, you might need to go spend a few days on the beach to recover from it all. Although Bangkok is not known for jaw-dropping tourist attractions, it does have an endless supply of worthwhile pilgrimages. The Grand Palace, Wat Phra Kaew, and the Emerald Buddha are tops on every visitor’s itinerary, and lesser-known temples, such as Wat Benjamabophit, the golden stupa of Wat Sakhet, and Wat Suthat, are all worthy of a stop. Besides temples, there are plenty of other interesting niches and touring possibilities to fit just about every interest. Take in a venom extraction and python feeding show at the Queen Saowapha Snake Farm, or go to the nearby Jim Thompson House to learn all about the famed Thai silk industry. If architecture is your forte, there is the Suan Pakkard Palace with its antique teak house collection, and the even more astounding Vimanmek Palace, which contains the world’s largest golden teak building. Bangkok’s Chinatown merits at least a day on every travel itinerary—be sure to check out the sprawling labyrinthine Flower and Thieves markets. Thai food is unrivaled for spice, taste, and variation. From multicourse meals to small street vendors, the one constant here is fresh and delicious at every level. You can have superlative roast duck or wonton noodles on a street corner for lunch and then be dining on world-class chef creations in the Oriental or Shangri-La hotels for supper. It doesn’t have to be all spicy Thai either, as Bangkok is home to excellent French, Italian, and other world cuisines, and you need a few years just to make a dent in all the options that are available. The Old City is a major destination for travelers, as it’s home to opulent temples like Wat Po and Wat Phra Kaew. Across the river is Thonburi, a mostly residential neighborhood, where you can find Wat Arun. At the northern tip of the Old City is Banglamphu, one of Bangkok’s older residential neighborhoods. It’s best known now for Khao San Road, a backpacker hangout, though the neighborhood has much more to offer, especially when it comes to street food. North of Banglamphu is Dusit, the royal district since the days of Rama V. East of the Old City is Chinatown, a labyrinth of streets with restaurants, shops, and warehouses. Farther down the Chao Phraya River is bustling Silom Road, one of the city’s major commercial districts. Patpong, the city’s most famous of several red-light districts, is also here. Bang Rak is home to some of the city’s leading hotels: the Mandarin Oriental, the Peninsula, the Royal Orchid Sheraton, and the Shangri-La. To the north of Rama IV Road is Bangkok’s largest green area, Lumphini Park. Continue north and you reach Sukhumvit Road, once a residential area. More recently, Thong Lor, farther east along Sukhumvit, has become the “in” neighborhood for those want to see and be seen. The Nana and Asok areas of Sukhumvit are now home to the even busier red-light entertainment districts (Nana and Soi Cowboy) than Patpong.

Date 01/03/2023
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 02/03/2023
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 03/03/2023
Location Singapore
In
Out

Advanced, airy and elevated, Singapore is a spectacular, futuristic vision of utopian city life. A healthy population of almost six million call it home, but this is a city designed with space to breathe, and gorgeous outdoor parks, massive indoor greenhouses and beautiful recreational spaces spread between the City of Gardens’ skyscrapers and soaring structures. Once a quiet fishing village, now a glistening island city-state and an international beacon of science, education and technology. View less

Singapore is almost intimidatingly clean – and the hyper-efficient public transport system whips residents and visitors across the city’s neighbourhoods in a heartbeat. Glorious fountains and audacious skyscrapers loom up – nodding to traditional feng shui beliefs – and putting on dazzling illuminated displays after dark. The lush green botanical gardens are a spectacular UNESCO World Heritage Site, covering 52 hectares and decorated with impressive colourful orchids. Or breathe in more of the freshest air by heading up to wander the canopy strung bridges of MacRitchie Reservoir Park. Head for the iconic Marina Bay – a landmark of the city crowned by three interconnected towers, which watch out over island sprinkled waters. Jaunt between Little India and the atmospheric Chinatown in minutes, where beautiful temples – like the Chinese Thian Hock Keng Temple and Hindu Sri Mariamman Temple add rich cultural intrigue. Singapore’s cuisine is a mouthwatering fusion of its Indian, Chinese, Indonesian, and Malay influences, taking and enhancing the best of each. Enjoy dishes in towering restaurants, or toast the glowing skyline with the city’s eponymous gin-soaked cocktail – a Singapore Sling.

Searching for the latest prices…

*

Chat Online

Click the live chat icon to speak with an agent today

Request a Callback

Let us call you back at a time to suit you. » Request a callback now.

Join the Cruise Club

Sign up today and join the UK’s favourite Cruise Club. » Join the Cruise Club.

Find a Cruise

Search 1000s of cruises for your next holiday. » Search for a cruise.

Enquire Now

Enquire Now

Please call 01246 819 819 to book this cruise