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Home Cruises Australia & New Zealand Noordam 2024-02-10

Australia & New Zealand - N415 MS Noordam departing 10 Feb 2024

Call now 01246 819 819 to book

MS Noordam
  • Carefully crafted journeys
  • Spacious-mid-sized ships
  • Exclusive onboard activities
  • Family friendly
Ship
Cruise Line
Embark
10 Feb 2024
Duration
12 Nights
From / To
Sydney / Auckland
Ports of call
Sydney - New Zealand Fiordland National Park - Dunedin - Lyttelton - Napier

Inside from £1,802pp

Outside from £1,536pp

Balcony from £2,400pp

Suite from £2,961pp

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Itinerary

Show sea days

Date Date
Location Location
 
In In
Out Out
Date 10/02/2024
Location Sydney
In
Out 18:30
Date 11/02/2024
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 12/02/2024
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 13/02/2024
Location New Zealand Fiordland National Park
In 07:00
Out 08:00

Milford Sound, or Piopiotahi (its name in Maori), sits on the west coast of New Zealand’s South Island and was first called the Eighth Wonder of the World by none other than Rudyard Kipling, who had seen some pretty wonderful places. As you sail up the 15-kilometer-long (nine-mile-long) sound, with soaring snow-topped peaks looming above—the tallest reaches an altitude of 1,517 meters (4,977 feet)—you’ll understand Kipling’s enthusiasm.

Although it is called a sound, it is technically a fjord—a narrow inlet created by glacial erosion over thousands of years. While its geological history is long, its human history is not. It is believed that the Maori first explored the sound, and the rest of the area that is now part of Fiordland National Park, around 1,000 years ago; Captain Cook followed in 1770. But neither Maori nor Europeans created permanent settlements of any significance, and the land was pristine when Fiordland National Park, New Zealand’s largest national park, was established in 1952. While many walking trails cross the park, the most breathtaking views are arguably those from the water, with the sheer rock faces looming above your ship as you sail through this majestic landscape.

Date 13/02/2024
Location At Sea
In
Out

Every year, visitors flock to New Zealand in search of landscapes straight out of Middle Earth. They find what they’re looking for in Fiordland National Park, on the southwestern coast of the South Island. This stunning 12,000-square-kilometer (4,633-square-mile) park encompasses mountains, lakes, fjords and rain forests. The area was once the home of Maori hunters; later, European whalers established small settlements here. But mostly, this region has seen a notable lack of human activity—the steep peaks and wet landscape deterred all but the hardiest people. That changed around the end of the 19th century, when travelers discovered the beautiful scenery of Fiordland. The national park was formally established in 1952.

Countless plant and animal species find a haven here. Among the park’s rare birds is the flightless takahe, thought for decades to be extinct until it was spotted in the area in 1948. The natural wonders continue offshore: Seals, dolphins and whales frequent these waters.

Date 14/02/2024
Location Dunedin
In 08:00
Out 17:00

Much of New Zealand feels like England, by way of Polynesia. There are a few exceptions, though, such as the town of Akaroa, a former French settlement, and the distinctly Scottish city of Dunedin, named after the Scottish Gaelic name for Edinburgh. After Dunedin was founded in 1848, city surveyor Charles Kettle attempted to impose Edinburgh’s New Town grid plan on the growing city. But the Otago Peninsula’s hilly landscape proved challenging—for evidence, note that Dunedin has one of the world’s steepest streets (Baldwin Street). The volcanic remnants around the harbor make for a dramatic backdrop.
Dunedin’s prominence during the gold rush in the late 19th century resulted in many grand Victorian and Edwardian buildings. Thanks to the beautiful University of Otago (the country’s oldest), there’s a large student population to keep the city vibrant and modern. But Dunedin’s heritage is always proudly on display: The magnificent Dunedin Railway Station and Larnach Castle have been restored to their full glory, and the fascinating Toitu Otago Settlers Museum provides a glimpse into the lives of early residents. Outside the city, the Otago Peninsula is lined with scenic beaches and home to rare birdlife like the royal albatross and yellow-eyed penguin.

Date 15/02/2024
Location Lyttelton
In 07:00
Out 16:00

Are you in England or New Zealand? It’s hard to tell in this city crowned by a neo-Gothic stone cathedral and set along the grassy banks of the Avon River. Nearby: the fertile Canterbury Plains and rugged high-country sheep stations.

Date 16/02/2024
Location Napier
In 13:00
Out 23:00

A city of vision, rebuilt in the striking, clean style of art deco after a devastating earthquake in 1931 and reinvented as a center for gourmet food and wines. Sample shore excursions: Napier Art Deco Highlights; Cape Kidnappers Gannet Safari; Hawke’s Bay Wineries; A Taste of New Zealand:: Epicurean Experience at Sileni Estates.

Date 17/02/2024
Location Gisborne
In 08:00
Out 17:00

The first city in the world to see the sun each day, Gisborne offers quaint rural charm, long sunny days and long sand beaches. The Maori name for this port city means “the coast upon which the sun shines across the water.” Stroll the City Rose Gardens and visit Tairawhiti Museum, whose grounds include a historic cottage. Or tour any of the lush local vineyards to sample the region’s famous wines. Sample shore excursions: Eastwoodhill Arboretum; Steam Train to Muriwai.

Date 18/02/2024
Location Tauranga (Rotorua)
In 08:00
Out 23:00

Site of fierce Maori wars, Tauranga today is a peaceful city in the heart of kiwifruit-growing country. Farther afield: Rotorua, with its spouting geysers and bubbling mud pools, the Waitomo Glow Worm Caves and nocturnal kiwi houses. Sample shore excursions: Fascinating Rotorua; Longridge Park & Jetboat Ride; Maori Marae Visit.

Date 19/02/2024
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 20/02/2024
Location Waitangi
In 08:00
Out

Historic sites—including the place where the most important treaty in New Zealand’s history was signed—winemaking, golfing, sailing and scenic beauty all combine to make the Bay of Islands one of this South Pacific nation’s most compelling regions. Located at the top of the North Island, the area has a subtropical microclimate that gives it an abundance of flora and fauna and a lengthy beach season. Comprising 144 islands between Cape Brett and the Purerua Peninsula, the Bay of Islands requires a few days to fully explore. Visitors with just a day here will have to make a tough choice: cultural immersion, nature appreciation or wining-dining-shopping. Waitangi, home to both the cruise port and the region’s historic treaty grounds, is one of three main towns with celebrated sights. The others are Kerikeri, with its historic buildings and vineyards, and Russell, where a notorious seafaring past has mellowed into tidy, day-trip-worthy charm. Those who’d rather experience the Bay of Islands’ breathtaking nature can walk amid majestic kauri trees, descend into glowworm caves or spy on whales and dolphins (or even swim with the latter) in one of New Zealand’s sunniest and most picturesque playgrounds.

Date 21/02/2024
Location Waitangi
In
Out 16:00

Historic sites—including the place where the most important treaty in New Zealand’s history was signed—winemaking, golfing, sailing and scenic beauty all combine to make the Bay of Islands one of this South Pacific nation’s most compelling regions. Located at the top of the North Island, the area has a subtropical microclimate that gives it an abundance of flora and fauna and a lengthy beach season. Comprising 144 islands between Cape Brett and the Purerua Peninsula, the Bay of Islands requires a few days to fully explore. Visitors with just a day here will have to make a tough choice: cultural immersion, nature appreciation or wining-dining-shopping. Waitangi, home to both the cruise port and the region’s historic treaty grounds, is one of three main towns with celebrated sights. The others are Kerikeri, with its historic buildings and vineyards, and Russell, where a notorious seafaring past has mellowed into tidy, day-trip-worthy charm. Those who’d rather experience the Bay of Islands’ breathtaking nature can walk amid majestic kauri trees, descend into glowworm caves or spy on whales and dolphins (or even swim with the latter) in one of New Zealand’s sunniest and most picturesque playgrounds.

Date 22/02/2024
Location Auckland
In 07:00
Out

New Zealand’s biggest city deserves more than a layover. Auckland is multicultural and cosmopolitan, with sizeable Polynesian, Asian and Maori populations enriching its history and broadening the palate. Internationally known chefs and fashion designers have made neighborhoods like Ponsonby, Newmarket and Parnell world-class destinations for shopping and dining.

You’re never far from water attractions in New Zealand—and this is especially true in Auckland where it’s not unheard of for downtown workers to go kayaking on their lunch break. The once-gritty port has been transformed into inviting public spaces and buzzing nightclubs, with sailboat charters and regular ferry connections waiting to whisk visitors around the harbor for sightseeing.

Start your day sipping a flat white while you plan your explorations: art gallery crawl, winery tour or volcano hike? It’s possible to do all three without losing sight of the Sky Tower, one of Auckland’s top tourist attractions, from which you can get a bird’s-eye view of the gateway to Aotearoa.

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