Enquire Now

Home Cruises Australia & New Zealand Silver Muse 2024-12-20

Australia & New Zealand - SM241220016 Silver Muse departing 20 Dec 2024

Call now 01246 819 819 to book

Silver Muse
Ship
Cruise Line
Embark
20 Dec 2024
Duration
16 Nights
From / To
Sydney / Auckland
Ports of call
Sydney - Eden - Melbourne - Burnie - New Zealand Fiordland National Park

Suite from Call for fares

Enquire Now

Itinerary

Show sea days

Date Date
Location Location
 
In In
Out Out
Date 20/12/2024
Location Sydney
In
Out 19:00

With its glorious harbour, lavish golden beaches and iconic landmarks, Sydney is Australia’s showpiece city. Creative and curious, discover the world-class cuisine, indigenous culture, and irresistible beach life that make Sydney one of the world’s most dynamic, exciting destinations. Sydney’s sparkling harbour is the heart of a richly cultural city. Overlooked by the metallic curves of the masterpiece of an Opera House, and that grand arched harbour bridge. Take it all in from the water, and admire the iconic landmarks, which are set before the city’s gleaming skyline backdrop. View less

If you’re feeling adventurous, take the legendary climb up the smooth curve of the bridge – nicknamed the Coathanger – to soak in the shining city’s spread from a unique perspective. Spread out to tan on one of the world’s most famous stretches of sand – Bondi Beach. Restaurants and bars burble away in the background, while the sun beams down, and surfers curl and leap over pure rollers. Swim in spectacular salty ocean pools, or wander the beautiful Bondi to Coogee coastal walk for more of this sun-gorged stretch of prime coastline. Leaving the thrills of Australia’s largest city behind is surprisingly simple – take to the skies to be flown above skyscrapers and rippling ribbons of waves, out to majestic peaks, sheer cliffs and iconic rock formations – like the Three Sisters of the Blue Mountains. Or, drop in on wildlife sanctuaries caring for the country’s animals – from hopping kangaroos to adorably cute, cuddly koalas.

Date 21/12/2024
Location Eden
In 10:00
Out 22:00

Known for the migrating whales that cruise through its waters between May and November, Eden sits in New South Wales’ scenic Twofold Bay. While the whales are now protected and cherished here, the town was initially founded as a whaling centre and has many fascinating stories to tell. Namely, a unique symbiotic relationship with the killer whales. Rewarded with the tongues from freshly caught whales, the orcas would help to round up baleen whales in the bay, making it easy for humans to land them.

This mutually beneficial exchange came to be known as The Law of the Tongue. Find out more about it, and the area’s whaling past, at Eden Killer Whale Museum – where you can see the skeleton of the most famous orca accomplice, Old Tom. A yearly whale festival now celebrates the return of the magnificent whales to these waters. Head into Ben Boyd National Park for amazing bird watching, and to see the arches of soaring rock formations rising beside fire-red cliffs. View the glorious coastal scenery of frothing aqua-seas and rugged headlands, from the viewing deck on top of Boyd’s Tower. Initially devised as a lighthouse, it would later be used as a lookout to spot whales breaching the bay’s waters, and to see Old Tom splashing his tail to alert the whalers. Travel through more glorious scenery and tangled rainforest, to the verdant promontory of Green Cape Lighthouse. Jutting out into the South Pacific Ocean, the pearly-white lighthouse caps crumbling cliffs and offers sweeping views of the jagged cliffs and wave-thrashed rocks. The wrecks that lie offshore attest to the respect these sometimes-punishing waves demand.

Date 22/12/2024
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 23/12/2024
Location Melbourne
In 07:00
Out 17:00

Melbourne is about the same size as Sydney, but there the similarity ends. Where Sydney is a jumble of hills and inlets, Melbourne spreads over a flat plain. Its pace, steadfast and sedate, contrasts with Sydney’s upbeat and brassy lifestyle.
Tree-shaded parks and gardens, a quiet bay and a proud stateliness become this capital of culture and the arts. Grand municipal buildings and splendid Victorian edifices, which sprang up in the wake of the gold rush, stand proudly along broad avenues.

Date 24/12/2024
Location Burnie
In 08:30
Out 17:00

Breathe in deep – here in Burnie, you’re tasting untouched air that is some of the cleanest anywhere in the world. Nearby Cradle Mountain once registered some of the world’s purest air – and the breezes here are purified by miles of uninterrupted ocean, stretching south to Antarctica. Tasmania itself is a place of sweeping National Parks, soaring granite mountain ranges and lakes reflecting spectacular scenery in glass-smooth surfaces.

With dense eucalyptus forests coating the hills, and hikes rewarding with deserted sandy beaches, it’s no surprise that Burnie life revolves around getting outdoors and exploring the natural splendour of this shield-shaped island state of Australia. If mountain hikes sound a little strenuous, spend some time getting to know the island’s adorable wildlife. Visit Fern Glade Reserve to see the spade-like beaks of platypuses gliding through the waters, or the Little Penguin Observation Centre where Burnie’s own colony of adorable penguins waddle playfully. West Beach’s golden sand is also close by, perfect for lying back and soaking up some sun, or for watching on as surfers skip across the curling waves. Burnie has always been a place where things get made – in the past this came with a tinge of grey industry, but the city has now reinvented itself as a hotspot for all things creative. View the island’s most revered works, learn how to fold your own paper creations in workshops, and marvel at skilled local creators working hard in their studios at the Maker’s Workshop. Great food is also on this maker’s city’s agenda – feast on freshly shucked oysters, and award-winning cheeses. Later, you can toast the artisan spirit of Burnie with a glass of cool climate wine, or by swirling a nightcap of single malt – some of the world’s best whiskeys are produced here.

Date 25/12/2024
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 26/12/2024
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 27/12/2024
Location New Zealand Fiordland National Park
In 10:00
Out 13:00

Milford Sound is a fiord in the southwest of New Zealand’s South Island. It’s known for towering Mitre Peak, plus rainforests and waterfalls like Stirling and Bowen falls, which plummet down its sheer sides. The fiord is home to fur seal colonies, penguins and dolphins. Milford Discovery Centre and Underwater Observatory offers views of rare black coral and other marine life. Boat tours are a popular way to explore.

Date 27/12/2024
Location At Sea
In 08:00
Out 18:00

As with all of New Zealand’s fiords, Doubtful Sound is a masterpiece of nature. The only way to reach it is by boat, crossing Lake Manapouri, so of the three Sounds (Dusky and Milford being the other two), Doubtful is the least touristy. Thus those who are lucky enough to experience Doubtful Sound deserve it. Because of the Sound’s inaccessibility, you’ll encounter very few people as you float through the silent waterways. Animals, however, are a different matter.

Because of the lack of human interaction, Mother Nature has been given a free rein here. The dense forest is rife with wildlife and birdsong is a constant soundtrack (otherwise it is the sound of silence). In the water, you can expect to get up close and personal with fur seals, pods of bottlenose dolphins and some lucky souls have even sighted the occasional whale and albatross. Ornithologists will no doubt already know that Doubtful Sound is home to the rare Fiordland Crested Penguin, so be sure to keep your binoculars ready as it would be a shame to miss the once in a lifetime sighting. The region is famous for its seven meter annual rainfall, so do not be surprised if the sun isn’t shining. Yet despite the potential mist, Doubtful Sound remains majestic. The waterfalls are more mesmerising, the glassy water more mysterious, and the mountains rising into the clouds more impressive. As the Fiordlands website puts it, Doubtful Sound offers its visitors “cloistered serenity”. Expect to be both humbled and uplifted.

Date 28/12/2024
Location Bluff
In 08:00
Out 18:00

The most southernmost town in New Zealand, Bluff (or The Bluff as it is locally known) is perhaps the most European of all the settlements in the country. Called Campbelltown until 1917, the city was officially renamed after the 265 meter conical hill that towers above it. One of the farthest corners of the British Empire, the inaugural Royal Tour of New Zealand by Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh, concluded at Bluff in January 1954.

Nowadays however, it is the Bluff oysters that are the stars of the show. Reputed to be the best in the world, these local heroes are what have really put Bluff on the map and are celebrated every May with a lively festival honouring Ostrea chilensis (that’s Latin for Bluff oyster). But gastronomy aside (and it is mostly oyster related), Bluff offers the adventurous traveller much in the way activity. Gateway to Stewart Island, day trippers here might enjoy hopping on the ferry for the hour long trip to Stewart Island, or New Zealand’s third island. Unspoilt, tranquil and stunning, Stewart Island is a showcase for New Zealand’s undiscovered tourism spots due to its privileged (yet remote) position in the world. However, for those who wish to stay on the mainland, the Bluff Maritime Museum is a “must visit” for anyone travelling along the Southern Scenic Route, with fascinating historical information about the many early shipwrecks in these challenging southern waters and coastlines. The comprehensive network of walking tracks will delight the ornithologists amongst you – just don’t forget your binoculars!

Date 29/12/2024
Location Dunedin
In 08:00
Out 18:00

At the head of one of New Zealand’s loveliest harbours lies gracious, dignified Dunedin. It was envisioned by its Scottish founders as the “Edinburgh of the South”. The city boasts a wealth of fine Victorian and Edwardian buildings, complete with spires, gables and gargoyles. Its Scottish heritage is evoked in street names and the sturdy appeal of its handsome stone buildings. Dunedin’s unique charm prompted one of its most famous visitors, Mark Twain, to write, “The people here are Scots. They stopped here on their way to heaven, thinking they had arrived.” True to its heritage, Dunedin boasts the country’s only kilt maker and whisky distillery, as well as a statue of Scottish poet Robert Burns in the heart of the city.

Date 30/12/2024
Location Akaroa
In 08:00
Out 18:00

With pretty painted cottages, overflowing verdant balconies and street names such as Rue Lavaud and Fleur Lane, you could be forgiven for thinking that you have stepped onto the streets of Provence upon arrival in Akaroa. And yet, here you are, in New Zealand’s South Island, less than 50 kilometres from Christchurch. The French connection stems from 1838, when Captain Jean Francois Langlois acquired the land for six British pounds (and questionable circumstances) from the Maoris.

He then travelled home to France in order to bring back anyone who might want to join him in his new life. However, during his travels, the Treaty of Waitangi was signed (signatories included two Akaroa Maori chiefs) and New Zealand’s first Governor, Hobson, declared sovereignty over the whole of New Zealand. Thus when Langlois and his settlers arrived back, they were faced with a choice: either return home to France or stay on. They chose the latter, and their legacy prevails. There are many stunning places on the coast of New Zealand, but none of them can quite hold a candle to Akaroa. Visually, it is stunning. Surrounded by natural wonders, the town (Maori for “Long Harbour”) stands on a peninsula formed by two volcanic cones, and is self-styled as nature’s playground. Such a moniker might seem superlative for other destinations, but not here: sheep graze almost right to the water’s edge, dolphins are regularly spotted in the many small, secluded bays and Lord of the Rings grandeur stretches as far as the eye can see.

Date 31/12/2024
Location Picton
In 08:30
Out 18:00

Only a narrow stretch of water separates North and South Island, but the differences between the two entities could not be more obvious – South Island with its wild beauty contrasting sharply with the more sedate landscapes of North Island.

Date 01/01/2025
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 02/01/2025
Location Napier
In 08:00
Out 18:00

Napier, with its pleasant Mediterranean climate and famous art deco architecture, is a charming and lively seaside resort located on the eastern side of North Island.

Date 03/01/2025
Location Gisborne
In 08:00
Out 18:00

With a population of around 35,000 and located on the north island, Gisborne exudes history at every turn. Maori for “Great standing place of Kiwa”, Kiwa was a leading figure aboard the Maori ancestral canoe, Takitimu, which ran aground in Gisborne around 1450 AD. After landing, Kiwa became a coastal guardian, eventually marrying Parawhenuamea, the keeper of the streams. View less

The union point of three rivers and the first place to see the sun, the city is filled with light and laugher and gracefully squeezes surfer’s beaches with the district’s colonial past. Captain Cook made his first landfall here, John Harris set up his first trading station in the then village and today, Gisborn is the major centre of Maori cultural life.Suffice to say then that the city is a watery wonderland. With its picture perfect beaches, what savvy traveller does not want to add being among the first people in the world to say they have watched the sky change colour as the sun bursts from out of the sea. A place of nature, spectacular beach cliff views are all just part and parcel of everyday life here, and easy walks from the centre of town to the Titirangi Reserve will award you with yet more unbelievable 180˚ vistas from Poverty Bay to Gisborne City; stretch your eyes with the panorama, while stretching your legs on one of the many enjoyable walks.A perfect place to stroll, amble and wander, like much of New Zealand Gisborne keeps a healthy respect for history and nature and enjoys a very laid back feel.

Date 04/01/2025
Location Tauranga (Rotorua)
In 08:30
Out 18:00

Tauranga is the principal city of the Bay of Plenty. The founders of Tauranga, 19th-century missionaries, left a legacy of well-planned parks and gardens for today’s residents and visitors to enjoy.

Date 05/01/2025
Location Auckland
In 07:00
Out

Blending beachy recreation with all the delights of a modern, diverse and thoroughly multicultural city, Auckland sits on the lucid blue-green waters of New Zealand’s north island. Known as the ‘City of Sails’, its two harbours will tempt you with waterfront walks, and the chance to breathe fresh sea air deep into your lungs while absorbing spectacular views of Auckland’s grand harbour bridge’s span.

Take in the true scale of Auckland’s magnificent cityscape by ascending 192 metres to the Sky Tower, and looking out over the city’s gleaming silver towers, which reflect on the abundant waters below. Views over the bay and adjacent islands await, and you can share elegant cocktails at this dizzying height, above the mingling yachts of Viaduct Harbour. Immerse yourself in the rich history and culture of the area at Auckland Art Gallery, Toi o Tāmaki. Set beside tranquil fountains and handsomely landscaped flowerbeds of Albert Park, the French-Renaissance building houses New Zealand’s most extensive art collection, and exhibits works from Māori and Pacific artists. New Zealand is world-renowned for its captivating natural scenery, and day trips across the sparkling bays, to nearby islands like Waiheke, Tiritiri Matangi, and Rangitoto, are always tempting. Discover lava caves, grape-laden vineyards and flourishing wildlife in the Hauraki Gulf’s islands. You’ll also find an exceptional 360-degree panorama over the city, to the horizon beyond, from the heights of ancient Mount Eden. The spectacular dormant volcano rises improbably from a city suburb, and also lends its name to Eden Park – the unusual, translucent stadium of New Zealand’s mighty All Blacks.

Searching for the latest prices…

*

Chat Online

Click the live chat icon to speak with an agent today

Request a Callback

Let us call you back at a time to suit you. » Request a callback now.

Join the Cruise Club

Sign up today and join the UK’s favourite Cruise Club. » Join the Cruise Club.

Find a Cruise

Search 1000s of cruises for your next holiday. » Search for a cruise.

Enquire Now

Enquire Now

Please call 01246 819 819 to book this cruise