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Home Cruises Barcelona To Lisbon Silver Moon 2022-10-11

Barcelona To Lisbon - MO221011C19 Silver Moon departing 11 Oct 2022

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Silver Moon
Ship
Cruise Line
Embark
11 Oct 2022
Duration
19 Nights
From / To
Barcelona / Lisbon
Ports of call
Barcelona - Palma - Valencia - Cartagena (Spain) - Malaga

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Itinerary

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Date Date
Location Location
 
In In
Out Out
Date 11/10/2022
Location Barcelona
In
Out 19:00

The infinite variety of street life, the nooks and crannies of the medieval Barri Gòtic, the ceramic tile and stained glass of Art Nouveau facades, the art and music, the throb of street life, the food (ah, the food!)—one way or another, Barcelona will find a way to get your full attention. The capital of Catalonia is a banquet for the senses, with its beguiling mix of ancient and modern architecture, tempting cafés and markets, and sun-drenched Mediterranean beaches.

A stroll along La Rambla and through waterfront Barceloneta, as well as a tour of Gaudí’s majestic Sagrada Famíliaand his other unique creations, are part of a visit to Spain’s second-largest city. Modern art museums and chic shops call for attention, too. Barcelona’s vibe stays lively well into the night, when you can linger over regional wine and cuisine at buzzing tapas bars.

Date 12/10/2022
Location Palma
In 08:00
Out 18:00

The Balearics are comprised of 16 islands; the three principal ones are Mallorca, Ibiza and Minorca. Carthaginians, Romans, Vandals and Arabs have invaded these islands over the centuries. Ruins show evidence of the prehistoric Talayot civilization, a megalithic culture that flourished here between 1500 BC and the Roman conquest. Today the islands are besieged by invaders of a different sort – hordes of tourists.
Lying 60 miles (97 km) off the Spanish mainland, the islands’ lush and rugged landscape combined with an extremely mild, sunny climate proves irresistible, especially to northern Europeans. As a result, the Balearics boast cosmopolitan resorts with lively nightlife and plenty of sports activities.
Mallorca (also spelled Majorca) is the largest of the islands, with an area of more than 1,400 square miles (3626 sq.km). The scenery is magnificent, with cliffs along indented shorelines jutting out of the sea and mountain ranges sheltering the plains from harsh sea breezes. The fertile plain in the centre is covered with almond and fig trees plus olive groves with some trees more than 1,000 years old. Tall pines, junipers and oaks line the mountain slopes.
Palma de Mallorca is the capital of the archipelago. A cosmopolitan city with sophisticated shops and restaurants, it also offers buildings of spectacular Moorish and Gothic architecture.
In the western part of Mallorca, nestled into the mountains, lies the village of Valldemosa. It is known for its Carthusian Monastery where Frédéric Chopin and George Sand spent the winter of 1838-39.

Date 13/10/2022
Location Valencia
In 08:00
Out 19:00

Valencia is Spain’s third largest city and capital of the region. It was originally founded by the Romans on the banks of the river Turia in 138 BC. In 711 AD the Moors arrived and converted the area into a rich agricultural and industrial center, establishing ceramics, paper, silk and leather industries. Muslim rule was briefly interrupted in 1094 by the legendary Castillian knight, El Cid. Valencia boomed in the 15th and 16th centuries, becoming one of the strongest Mediterranean trading centers.
Valencia is a vibrant, friendly and chaotic city that boasts an outstanding fine arts museum and one of the most exciting nightlife scenes in Spain. The city center is about 3 miles inland from the coast. Plaza del Ayuntamiento marks the center of Valencia. Surrounded by flower stalls, it is also home to the town hall and the main post office. The cathedral was begun in the 13th century and finished in 1482. It has many architectural styles, including Gothic, Baroque and Romanesque. The octagonal bell-tower, called Miguelete, is one of the city’s landmarks. The small cathedral museum boasts a tabernacle made from 550 pounds of gold, silver, platinum, emeralds and sapphires. It also purports to be the home of the Holy Grail, the cup used by Christ at the Last Supper.
West of the cathedral is the oldest part of the city, known as El Carme. Situated across the river in the Jardines del Real is the Museo de Bellas Artes, the Fine Arts Museum. Works include those by El Greco, Goya and Velázquez.

Date 14/10/2022
Location Cartagena (Spain)
In 08:00
Out 18:00

On the crossroads of mighty cultures, this Murcian port has endless ancient stories to share. A valuable natural harbour attracted many civilisations to this sun-bathed, southeasterly setting – following its foundation by the Carthaginians in 227 BC. Blending the imprints left by countless cultures on this global junction, the presence of everyone from the Vandals to the Phoenicians and Moors can be felt as you explore, walking between ruins and celebrated modernist architecture along Calle Mayor. Cartagena is crowned by the soaring Castillo de la Concepcion – rise to the stout castle aboard a panoramic lift. Inside, look through reams of archaeological treasures, or admire the rolling views down over the port and across the waters. Watch out for the electric blue peacocks who strut flamboyantly. Cartagena’s emergence as a visitor destination coincided with a stunning discovery in 1988 – the bowl of a gloriously preserved Roman Theatre. Enter to sit among the grandiose ancient venue, so evocative, you can’t help but imagine the historic performances that have graced its stage. Wander the breezy waterfront, looking across the narrow strait towards Africa’s distant haze, and spotting gleaming warships. Cartagena’s perfect harbour means it has been one of Spain’s oldest strategic navy positions since the 16th century. Settle to enjoy the joys of tapas in lively bars – sampling crisped paella, squid and honeyed-aubergine. Easter’s Semana Santa festivities are typically lively here, as hooded processions, lavish floats and sombre fiery displays roll through the streets.

Date 15/10/2022
Location Malaga
In 08:00
Out 19:00

Bathing in the sunshine coast’s stunning subtropical climate, and laying out endless spectacular beaches, it’s no surprise that Malaga is one of Spain’s most popular cities. The already impressive cultural appeal of this holiday city has skyrocketed over recent years, and with a storied old town and Moorish fortifications, Malaga has a lot to offer. Nearby, you can recline on the renowned beaches of the Costa del Sol, or venture inland to discover the Moorish treasures of Granada and Cordoba. View less

La Malagueta beach is Malaga’s spacious urban beach, perfect for a sunbathe and a dip in the warm water, before enjoying seaside cocktails or seafood tapas in the restaurants nearby. Malaga and the Costa del Sol may be best known for glorious weather and beaches, but Malaga can now stake a genuine claim as an artistic powerhouse too. Visit the renowned Picasso museum – housed in the artist’s birthplace – before exploring the freshly opened outpost of the Pompidou Centre. The art also spills out onto the streets in the colourful Soho district – splashed with vibrant street paintings. Known as La Manquita – or the one-armed woman – the city’s cathedral rises over the historic old town. Its huge bell tower stands tall, but an accompanying second tower was never completed – hence the nickname. The Alcazaba fortress palace looms over the waterfront and forms a spectacularly preserved remnant from the era when the Moors controlled the Andalucía region. Discover more of the Arabic influence by visiting Granada’s Alhambra palace, or Cordoba’s La Mezquita mosque. Together with Seville’s converted cathedral, the cities form Andalucía’s Golden Triangle of Moorish wonders.

Date 16/10/2022
Location Seville
In 08:00
Out

More than a hundred watchtowers gaze out across the waves surrounding this ancient Andalusian city. Sprinkled with evocative cobbled side streets, you’ll explore 3,000 years’ worth of history, while stumbling across palm-tree lined plazas of shaded coffee sippers. Cadiz claims the mantle of Western Europe’s oldest city, and every piece of architecture – and every wrong turn – offers a chance to discover fascinating new tales. Founded by the Phoenicians in 1100BC, Christopher Columbus used the city as a base for his exploratory, map-defining voyages of 1493 and 1502.

The port grew in importance and wealth as Cadiz’s strategic location close to Africa’s northern tip helped it blossom into a centre for New World trade. Catedral de Cádiz, is a display of the city’s wealth and importance, looming spectacularly over the Atlantic’s waves, with cawing seagulls sweeping between its twin bell towers. Inside, treasures from the city’s trading exploits in the West Indies and beyond – which helped fuel the growth of this historically prosperous city – are on display. Enveloped by ocean on almost every side, Cadiz has something of an island feel, and you can cool off from southern Spain’s unrelenting sunshine on the sweeping golden sand beach of Playa Victoria. The two towers of the new El Puente de la Constitución de 1812 mark a contemporary landmark in this most ancient of cities, in the form of a spectacular new road bridge. Torre Tavira, meanwhile, is the most famous of Cadiz’s army of watchtowers, and the highest point in the city. Reach the top for a view of the ocean fringing the city’s expanse, and to learn about the towers – constructed so trading merchants could survey the harbour from their lavish homes. The Central Market is a chaotic place of bartering, where flashing knives dissect fresh fish. Stop in at the orbiting bars to enjoy tapas, freshly prepared with the market’s produce.

Date 17/10/2022
Location Seville
In
Out 00:30

More than a hundred watchtowers gaze out across the waves surrounding this ancient Andalusian city. Sprinkled with evocative cobbled side streets, you’ll explore 3,000 years’ worth of history, while stumbling across palm-tree lined plazas of shaded coffee sippers. Cadiz claims the mantle of Western Europe’s oldest city, and every piece of architecture – and every wrong turn – offers a chance to discover fascinating new tales. Founded by the Phoenicians in 1100BC, Christopher Columbus used the city as a base for his exploratory, map-defining voyages of 1493 and 1502.

The port grew in importance and wealth as Cadiz’s strategic location close to Africa’s northern tip helped it blossom into a centre for New World trade. Catedral de Cádiz, is a display of the city’s wealth and importance, looming spectacularly over the Atlantic’s waves, with cawing seagulls sweeping between its twin bell towers. Inside, treasures from the city’s trading exploits in the West Indies and beyond – which helped fuel the growth of this historically prosperous city – are on display. Enveloped by ocean on almost every side, Cadiz has something of an island feel, and you can cool off from southern Spain’s unrelenting sunshine on the sweeping golden sand beach of Playa Victoria. The two towers of the new El Puente de la Constitución de 1812 mark a contemporary landmark in this most ancient of cities, in the form of a spectacular new road bridge. Torre Tavira, meanwhile, is the most famous of Cadiz’s army of watchtowers, and the highest point in the city. Reach the top for a view of the ocean fringing the city’s expanse, and to learn about the towers – constructed so trading merchants could survey the harbour from their lavish homes. The Central Market is a chaotic place of bartering, where flashing knives dissect fresh fish. Stop in at the orbiting bars to enjoy tapas, freshly prepared with the market’s produce.

Date 18/10/2022
Location Lisbon
In 07:00
Out 19:00

Lisbon, the capital of Portugal, is a city open to the sea and carefully planned with 18th-century elegance. Its founder is said to be the legendary Ulysses, but the theory of an original Phoenician settlement is probably more realistic. Known in Portugal as Lisboa, the city was inhabited by the Romans, Visigoths and, beginning in the 8th century, the Moors. Much of the 16th century was a period of great prosperity and overseas expansion for Portugal. Tragedy struck on All Saints’ Day in 1755 with a devastating earthquake that killed about 40,000 people. The destruction of Lisbon shocked the continent. As a result, the Baixa (lower city) emerged in a single phase of building, carried out in less than a decade by the royal minister, the Marques de Pombal. His carefully planned layout of a perfect neo-classical grid survived to this day and remains the heart of the city. Evidence of pre-quake Lisbon can still be seen in the Belém suburb and the old Moorish section of the Alfama that sprawls below the Castle of St. George.
Lisbon is a compact city on the banks of the Tagus River. Visitors find it easy to get around as many places of interest are in the vicinity of the central downtown area. There is a convenient bus and tram system and taxis are plentiful. Rossio Square, the heart of Lisbon since medieval times, is an ideal place to start exploring. After a fire destroyed parts of the historic neighborhood behind Rossio in 1988, many of the restored buildings emerged with modern interiors behind the original façades.
The city boasts a good many monuments and museums, such as the Jeronimos Monastery, Tower of Belém, the Royal Coach Museum and the Gulbenkian Museum. High above the Baixa is the Bairro Alto (upper city) with its teeming nightlife. The easiest way to connect between the two areas is via the public elevator designed by Gustave Eiffel.
Cruising up the Tagus River to the ship’s berth, you can already spot three of Lisbon’s famous landmarks: the Monument to the Discoveries, the Tower of Belém and the Statue of Christ, which welcomes visitors from its hilltop location high above Europe’s longest suspension bridge.

Date 19/10/2022
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 20/10/2022
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 21/10/2022
Location Horta
In 09:00
Out 23:00

Far adrift, in the Atlantic’s vast sweep, Horta serves as a welcoming island respite for some truly epic ocean voyages. One of the most westerly parts of Europe, these Portuguese islands lie a full 1,100 miles from the coast of the mainland. The bustling marina here serves as the perfect stopover and a welcome respite for tired sailors and yachts embarking on transatlantic crossings. View less

The colourful harbour is decorated with a multicoloured patchwork of their stories and flags, and adding to this massive, ever-growing mural is said to offer sailors protection while out on the seas. While Horta’s clientele may come and go with the waves, there’s nothing transient about the stunning volcanic cones and soaring wildflower-splashed hills that make up this beautiful Atlantic island pit-stop. Horta is the main city, and a charming welcome to dry land, as you step onto the pentagon-shaped island of Faial. On the frontier of continents, the violent meeting of the European and North American tectonic plates forged this beautiful archipelago – and the rich volcanic scenery here is ripe for exploration and adventure. The busy harbour lies before the dramatic backdrop of the neighbouring Pico Island’s cloud-wisped peak – head up to Espalamaca Lookout for the best view of Horta’s busy harbour and islands emerging nearby. Horta has a grand volcanic caldera of its own, and you can journey up through threads of cloud, to look down into the island’s immense, bowl-shaped crater. The Lighthouse of Ponta dos Capelinhos is an island icon, having survived 1957’s dramatic eruption. It now occupies a scenic location on a headland, surrounded by vast swathes of charred new land, which were churned out from the depths.

Date 22/10/2022
Location Praia da Vitória
In 08:00
Out 18:00

Set on the east of is the seventh island in the Azores (if you’re starting from the west) Praia da Vitoria often gets overlooked on your way to reach the mainland after days at sea. While many assume the Azores archipelago only offer hardy respite – not to mention terra firma – for travellers who have been enjoying a transatlantic crossing, the archipelago is beginning to gain global recognition as destinations that are well worth visiting in their own right. View less

Praia da Vitoria literally translates as “the beach of victory” yet with such an auspicious name, one would be wrong to assume that it is only fun in the sun on the island. Laden with history dating back to the 15th century, Gaspar Frutuoso (the celebrated Azorean historian and priest), wrote about Praia in the 16th century calling it “noble and sumptuous”. The adjectives certainly ring true even today, with its jumble of narrow streets, recently modernised marina promenade and architectural marvels (the old town dates from 1480), Paria da Vitoria has lost nothing of its past grandeur. A stroll to the main square and its market place – unchanged since 1670, or down to the small 16th century fort south of the beach is proof of that! An interesting quirk to note about the town is that due to the two orders Santo Cristo and Misericórdia in the 18th century and in order to please everyone, everything was built in double. This means that the lovely Igreja do Senhor Santo Cristo church (also known as da Misericórdia) has two high alters and two choirs. The church dates from 1521 and was partially destroyed in a fire in 1921.

Date 23/10/2022
Location Ponta Delgada
In 08:00
Out 18:00

Providing a gorgeous green welcome to sailors venturing on the long journey across the Atlantic, Ponta Delgada’s shoreline is a reassuring sight, as it emerges into view. Sat on São Miguel Island, the largest of Portugal’s Azores islands – which wait on an outpost of western Europe, some 1,100 miles from the mainland. Ponta Delgada is the island’s largest city, and a place of spectacular volcanic vistas, steaming hot springs and impressive landscaped gardens. View less

The city’s signature trio of arches welcomes you to Ponta Delgada, and its island of verdant volcanic contrasts. Wander between monochrome churches like the Gothic Church of St. Sebastian, and up to the Convent and Chapel of Our Lady of Hope – which houses the revered icon of Christ that is paraded through the streets annually, and believed to have miraculous powers by locals. Or, head for beaches offering sanctuary on charcoal-coloured sands, or the tropical António Borges Botanical Gardens, where tropical plants add extra shades to the Green Island’s scenery. Now extinct, the mighty Caldeira das Sete Cidades is a truly awe-inspiring sight – and the colossal collapsed volcanic caldera blooms with lush greenery and scattered wildflowers. The vast crater has been taken over by a glowing, picturesque lake, which reflects the blue sky above. A full three miles wide – and with a circumference of eight miles – it’s a vast panorama to take in. The Lagoa de Fogo – or Lake of Fire – is another of the island’s calderas – rise up to see the crumpled scenery encasing a beautiful lake. São Miguel Island’s geothermal activity has practical uses too, and you can harness the powers to unwind any tired muscles after a long day, by sinking into the hot springs of Poca Da Dona.

Date 24/10/2022
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 25/10/2022
Location Funchal
In 08:00
Out 15:00

Bedecked with dramatic cliffs, fertile mountains and sun-gorged beaches, Madeira is a lush, colourful island of plants, paradise and Portuguese-flavoured pleasures. Bathing in year-round sunshine, Funchal – the lowkey capital of Madeira – is perfect for slowing the pace, and toasting the thrilling scenery with a bottle of the island’s famous wine. Narrow, cobblestone streets line the old town, where whitewash buildings, iron-wrought balconies, and tiled patterns carry echoes of Lisbon. Rua de Santa Maria is the city’s oldest street, and the doors have been vividly painted by local artists.

Sit for a drink, to sample your choice of Madeira’s renowned wines – Boal is the ideal option for those with a sweeter tooth. You’ll also find Corpo Santo Chapel here, one of the few remaining buildings to have survived from the 15th century. Blossoming parks and gardens splash colour around, and the sweet smell of pollen lingers in Parque de Santa Catarina. Look out over Funchal harbour between the fountains and blooming flower beds, as ducks and swans enjoy leisurely days on the lake. Madeira Botanical Garden waits in the hills over the city, along with Palhero Garden – a sophisticated and elegantly landscaped English garden, 500 meters above sea level. For an even more dramatic view of this gorgeous setting, head up to Cap Girao – a rusty-red cliff with a cable car strung up to its sheer drop. The cliff falls away vertically to the vivid blue waters below. Or head down to the sea, to enjoy Funchal’s gorgeous pebble beaches rustling, framed by colossal, craggy cliffs.

Date 26/10/2022
Location Santa Cruz De La Palma (Canary Islands)
In 08:00
Out 16:00

Santa Cruz de Tenerife is the capital of the island of La Palma. Because of its spectacular vegetation and exuberant natural beauty, it is considered by many the most beautiful of the Canary Islands and referred to as the Pretty Isle – La Isla Bonita. In addition to its outstanding natural attributes, the island boasts a culture full of traditions, cuisine, crafts and folklore from the time of the original inhabitants, who left a variety of archaeological riches. View less

Once an important transatlantic port during colonial days, today Santa Cruz has the look of a genuine open-air museum. With colonial houses and carved balconies lining the streets, the port city retains the old-world charm of its glory days. Acclaimed attractions in the interior include the Taburiente National Park with its giant crater that has been photographed from the Space Shuttle, and the Roque de los Muchachos Astrophysics Observatory, standing on the island’s highest point (7,260 feet) and considered the most important of its kind in the northern hemisphere. The green of the countryside, the abundant water and the floral wealth stands in sharp contrast to the many volcanic cones and lava flows that testify to the island’s origins. The oldest volcanic rocks are estimated to be about 3 to 4 million years of age. There were seven recorded eruptions, the most recent one in 1971. While favored by pleasant temperatures in all seasons, the climate varies enormously between the south and the north of the island. The northeast is known to experience moisture-laden trade winds; the southwest is much drier and sunnier. Along the coastal strip, up to an altitude of 600 feet, temperatures are usually in the 70s, while higher up they drop in the winter time, even to freezing point at elevations above 6,000 feet. Our call to La Palma allows you to discover this island’s amazingly different faces over a relatively small area. Mountains and volcanoes, beaches and forests, tiny villages and breathtaking views make up the impressive profile of La Isla Bonita.

Date 27/10/2022
Location Fuerteventura
In 09:00
Out 23:00

Puerto del Rosario emerged at the end of the 18th century as a small cattle-raising center on the current bay. The city, known then as Puerto de Cabras (port of goats), was transformed in the middle of the 18th century into a prosperous commercial port, a fact which favored it being declared capital of Fuerteventura in 1860, a status which until then was held by Betancuria.

Date 28/10/2022
Location Lanzarote
In 08:00
Out 16:00

Nestled on the east coast of Lanzarote, Arrecife takes its name from the rocky reefs and outcrops that dominate its coastline. This pretty working city has a friendly, authentic feel, and has managed to remain true to its roots as a historic fishing village. There’s a lot to explore, and whether you want to lie back on long swathes of opulent golden sand, or strap on hiking boots to crunch across Lanzarote’s scorched volcanic scenery, this versatile capital has so much to offer.

With castles, caves, sleepy beaches, and a glittering saltwater lagoon, Arrecife is the perfect place to get acquainted with the sun-kissed appeal of the Canary Islands. Lanzarote’s charcoal desert vistas radiate a remarkable luna-like quality, but dotted cacti, waving palms, and bursts of vibrant wildflowers add an accent of colour to the canvas. Arrecife itself boasts apricot-coloured beaches and labyrinthine lanes of white-wash buildings within its Old Quarter, where you can smell fresh fish grilling, and see locals dipping delicious local salty potatoes – papas arrugadas – into colourful sauces. An evening stroll along El Charco de san Gines is a must for watching fishing boats bobbing gently on the lagoon, and watching spectacular sunsets burning across the sky. Standing tall for more than four centuries, Castillo De San Gabriel is located on the tiny island of Islote de los Ingleses, and was once a target for pirates, who would appear menacingly on the Atlantic’s horison. The stalwart 16th-century fortress now serves as the History Museum of Arrecife, and exhibitions inside explore the evolution of the city, and the ancient culture of Lanzarote. The International Museum of Contemporary Art, meanwhile, displays modern and abstract works within the 18th-century San José Castle’s refined setting. See works from Cesar Manrique – the prominent artist and architect whose slick sixties style flair can be admired across the island.

Date 29/10/2022
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 30/10/2022
Location Lisbon
In 07:00
Out

Lisbon, the capital of Portugal, is a city open to the sea and carefully planned with 18th-century elegance. Its founder is said to be the legendary Ulysses, but the theory of an original Phoenician settlement is probably more realistic. Known in Portugal as Lisboa, the city was inhabited by the Romans, Visigoths and, beginning in the 8th century, the Moors. Much of the 16th century was a period of great prosperity and overseas expansion for Portugal. Tragedy struck on All Saints’ Day in 1755 with a devastating earthquake that killed about 40,000 people. The destruction of Lisbon shocked the continent. As a result, the Baixa (lower city) emerged in a single phase of building, carried out in less than a decade by the royal minister, the Marques de Pombal. His carefully planned layout of a perfect neo-classical grid survived to this day and remains the heart of the city. Evidence of pre-quake Lisbon can still be seen in the Belém suburb and the old Moorish section of the Alfama that sprawls below the Castle of St. George.
Lisbon is a compact city on the banks of the Tagus River. Visitors find it easy to get around as many places of interest are in the vicinity of the central downtown area. There is a convenient bus and tram system and taxis are plentiful. Rossio Square, the heart of Lisbon since medieval times, is an ideal place to start exploring. After a fire destroyed parts of the historic neighborhood behind Rossio in 1988, many of the restored buildings emerged with modern interiors behind the original façades.
The city boasts a good many monuments and museums, such as the Jeronimos Monastery, Tower of Belém, the Royal Coach Museum and the Gulbenkian Museum. High above the Baixa is the Bairro Alto (upper city) with its teeming nightlife. The easiest way to connect between the two areas is via the public elevator designed by Gustave Eiffel.
Cruising up the Tagus River to the ship’s berth, you can already spot three of Lisbon’s famous landmarks: the Monument to the Discoveries, the Tower of Belém and the Statue of Christ, which welcomes visitors from its hilltop location high above Europe’s longest suspension bridge.

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Please call 01246 819 819 to book this cruise