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Home Cruises Bridgetown to Lima (Callao) Silver Moon 2022-11-24

Bridgetown to Lima (Callao) - MO221124C27 Silver Moon departing 24 Nov 2022

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Silver Moon
  • Door-to-Door All-Inclusive
  • Private Executive Transfers
  • Butler Service in every Suite
  • Complimentary Beverages
  • Gourmet Dining
  • Gratuities Included
Ship
Cruise Line
Embark
24 Nov 2022
Duration
27 Nights
From / To
Bridgetown, Barbados / Lima, Peru
Ports of call
Bridgetown, Barbados - Fort De France, Martinique - Gustavia - Spanish Town / Prickly Pear - San Juan, Puerto Rico
Rating

Suite from Call for fares

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Itinerary

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Date Date
Location Location
 
In In
Out Out
Date 24/11/2022
Location Bridgetown, Barbados
In
Out

Bridgetown, the captivating capital of Barbados, combines faded colonial history, captivating tradition, and vivid white beaches plucked directly from your richest imagination of Caribbean perfection. Recently listed as a UNESCO World Heritage site, thanks to its beautifully preserved colonial architecture, Bridgetown’s mask of modernity covers a core of complex history and fascinating culture. Sherbet coloured buildings line up to overlook the waterfront of the Constitution River at the ‘The Careenage’ – where gleaming ships bob on the blue water, and peaceful strolls along a wooden boardwalk await.

Stop for a sobering moment at the commemorative plaque honouring the people traded at this spot, when Bridgetown was the British Empire’s most important harbour, and first stop on the Transatlantic Slave Trade crossing. Just five minutes’ stroll from here is Carlisle Bay – a postcard-perfect place where you’ll find crystal-clear, turquoise seawater glowing in the Caribbean sun, and a mile of soft white powder sand. A treasure trove for divers, the shipwrecks scattered below the shallow water’s waves are now inhabited by turtles and swirling, rainbow-coloured tropical fish. Head to the backstreets, where street food vendors serve up spicy chicken soup, barbecued pigtails and thirst-quenching coconut water. There are bargains aplenty to be had on Broad Street, where duty-free malls and souvenir stalls cram together, vying for your attention. Roebuck Street is the spot where one of the Caribbean’s favourite drinks, rum, was discovered – having been created here from the by-products of the island’s booming sugarcane trade. Nowadays, it’s lined with bars splashing every variety of the deliciously spicy dark libation imaginable into glasses. For a touch more culture, visit one of the oldest synagogues in The Americas – Nidhe Israel Synagogue, which was built in 1654. The adjoining museum tells the story of Barbados’ Jewish immigrants, who were instrumental in the island’s development.

Date 25/11/2022
Location Fort De France, Martinique
In
Out

The largest of the Windward Islands, Martinique is 4,261 mi (6,817 km) from Paris, but its spirit and language are decidedly French, with more than a soupçon of West Indian spice. Tangible, edible evidence of the fact is the island’s cuisine, a superb blend of French and creole. Martinique is lushly landscaped with tropical flowers. Trees bend under the weight of fruits such as mangoes, papayas, lemons, limes, and bright-red West Indian cherries. Acres of banana plantations, pineapple fields, and waving sugarcane stretch to the horizon.

The towering mountains and verdant rain forest in the north lure hikers, while underwater sights and sunken treasures attract snorkelers and scuba divers. Martinique is also wonderful if your idea of exercise is turning over every 10 minutes to get an even tan and your taste in adventure runs to duty-free shopping. A popular cruise-ship excursion goes to St-Pierre, which was buried by ash when Mont Pelée erupted in 1902.

Date 26/11/2022
Location Gustavia
In
Out

Cherry red roofs, yacht-sprinkled bays and a sophisticated French flavour all add to the gorgeous Caribbean allure of Gustavia. The island’s capital rolls around a horseshoe-shaped harbour, where gleaming yachts hover and fancy boutiques, bars and restaurants fizz with life and clinking cutlery. Head up to red and white Gustavia Lighthouse to look down over the revered waters, which attract many a celebrity guest and diving enthusiast to these shores. View less

Christopher Columbus was the first European to discover this volcanic island in 1493, giving it the name St Barthelemy in honour of his younger brother. The island has a unique history as a Swedish colony, following a deal with the French King Louis XVI to exchange the island with Sweden for better trading rights. It was returned to French control in 1878 and is now a French Overseas Collectivity. Learn more of the Swedish legacy at Fort Karl – which sits on a 29-metre-high hill above Shell Beach. The fort now lies in ruins, but you’ll meet wandering iguanas, and the views down of sweeping sea and emerald coastline are some of the island’s finest. Down below, a delightful spread of tiny pebbles and shell fragments are scattered like confetti and lapped by crystal-clear water. A little exploration uncovers countless other glorious beaches and natural wonders. Colombier Beach is a little out of the way but cradles silky-smooth sands and typically turquoise waters. If you have chance, find somewhere to settle and sip fruity rum cocktails as the sunset flares across the waves.

Date 27/11/2022
Location Spanish Town / Prickly Pear
In
Out

Cruising in the azure waters of the British Virgin Islands (B.V.I.) has been popular for a long time. Although Virgin Gorda boasts a small airport, it seems that most of the visitors prefer arriving by sea – aboard their own yacht or on one of the ferryboats from Tortola or the U.S. Virgin Islands. Virgin Gorda is also a popular call for cruise vessels.

Columbus discovered the islands in 1493, an archipelago consisting of some 60 small islets and rocky outcrops of which Tortola and Virgin Gorda are the largest ones. After a frequent change of hands, ranging from the Spaniards to the Dutch and some notorious pirates in between, the British took over in the 17th century and still retain control to this day. As a Crown Colony the B.V.I. have a governor who is appointed by the Queen.

The British established a plantation economy and developed the sugar industry with slaves to work the cane fields. When slavery was abolished in 1838, the plantations deteriorated and many of the Europeans returned home. In the 1960s, the beginnings of a profitable tourist industry got under way when Laurence Rockefeller established Little Dix resort. He foresaw that the islands’ balmy weather, powder-soft beaches and splendid sailing opportunities would make them an ideal holiday destination.

Although the B.V.I. are only a short distance from the U.S. Virgin Islands, they are vastly different in character. The slow and restorative pace is perfect for visitors who want to get away from it all and simply enjoy the pleasures of this small hideaway. The British Virgin Islanders, too, love their unspoiled tropical home and are determined to maintain its easygoing way of life.

Seven-mile-long Virgin Gorda has a population of about 2,500; the majority lives in the relatively flat southern portion. The northern half is mountainous; 1,370-foot Gorda Peak is the highest point on the island. Virgin Gorda’s chief attraction, The Baths, lies in the island’s southern part near the tiny capital of Spanish Town. The Baths consist of enormous boulders that form natural pools and underwater caves – an attraction seldom missed by visitors to the area.

Date 28/11/2022
Location San Juan, Puerto Rico
In
Out

Sitting on the north coast of this lush, tropical island, San Juan is the second settlement founded by European settlers in the Caribbean, and the oldest city under US jurisdiction. The stocky walls and watchtowers here have stood the test of time, repelling notable invaders – such as Sir Francis Drake – and the pirates who historically looted these islands. With massive fortresses, airy plazas and sheer Caribbean beauty, San Juan is a beach-blessed star of these turquoise waters. View less

With more than 500 years of European history, Old San Juan gleams In Puerto Rico’s sunshine, with sugar-almond painted facades and ankle-testing cobbled lanes. Decorative balconies and varnished wooden doors add everyday artistry to streets, dripping with history. Soak up the culture at rum-fuelled parties and salsa dances on this Spanish-culture infused island, or recline into afternoon relaxation sessions on sensational slivers of gleaming sand. Kick back on the beach, or satisfy a lust for adventure by exploring sprawling mangrove forests. The magic of sea kayaking after dark here is an experience you won’t forget. Break the waves with your oar, and watch as the waters illuminate with neon colour, as bioluminescence creates a mystical, peaceful spectacle. Pocked limestone cliffs and karst landscapes add rugged contrast to the serenity of the beaches, and you can walk into folds of the earth in sea-carved caves, or across cliffs to hidden views of the Caribbean’s expanse. Enjoy a taste of the island’s cuisine by sampling Mofongo – a local concoction of green plantains and chicken. Why not indulge and wash it down with an iced mojito, made from crushed mint and locally distilled rum?

Date 29/11/2022
Location St. Thomas
In
Out

The steep, spectacular hills that surround St Thomas’s exquisite harbour provide a fitting entry point for this island of overwhelming natural splendour. The jungled-mountains reach up above tempting beaches and scuba diving sites, while Charlotte Amalie – the island’s capital – sprawls down towards the water, bedecked with shops and tasty restaurants. Part of the beautiful U.S. Virgin Islands – together with St John and St Croix – these lands were purchased by the US in 1917. View less

Nowadays, St Thomas is a patchwork of cultures, and a lively welcome to the islands, serving as a gracious host to the many visitors who linger – as well as those who jump on ferries, yachts and catamarans to explore the blessed beaches of the Caribbean’s other retreats. A stunning island of dramatic jungled-scenery, keep your camera close to hand as you swing up the Skyride to Paradise Point, to look down over the natural amphitheatre of the dock and city below. Snap some more postcard-perfect shots at Drake’s Seat – said to be Sir Francis Drake’s lookout point, where he could survey for approaching enemy ships. Nowadays, the views over Magens Bay and the infinite sea are always peaceful, and this is a great spot to catch a fiery Caribbean sunset spilling across the sky. Take catamaran cruises to explore the shining coastline, or seek out the glorious coves and caves that are hidden along the island’s perimeter. Land on the secluded shores of tiny islands, before scuba diving and snorkelling above the twisted boughs of lost ships, reclaimed by the waters and inhabited by curious tropical fish life. Kayak over still lagoon waters, or take the chance to lay back on soft beaches strewn with tiny shells, as St Thomas’s beauty washes over you.

Date 30/11/2022
Location St Johns, Antigua
In
Out

Lush and lively, Antigua is a bedazzling Caribbean destination, gorged with sunshine and crisp white sand beaches. Historic forts, sparkling coastline, and dense rainforest all contribute to Antigua’s land of thrilling natural beauty. With its bright blue to turquoise sea gradients – the beaches are vibrant and plentiful and the island has no shortage to choose from, with a rumoured 365 options. Experience the beauty on horseback, as your ride pounds across the sands, and the wind whips through your hair. View less

Choose to loll in a catamaran offshore, or lie back on a bed of the softest sand to soak it all in. Beach shacks cook up fresh seafood and spicy goat meat curries if you’re feeling hungry. St John’s glows in the sunshine, with flamingo pink and baby blue paints boldly coating vivid Georgian buildings. Lively markets offer an authentic slice of Antiguan life, while museums celebrate the island’s revered cricketers like Viv Richards, and the story of independence. The whacks and whoops of makeshift cricket games hint at the island’s British history, and you can see more of this heritage at Falmouth Harbour – which was the centre of the British presence in the Caribbean. The area is still filled with sailers and dallying yachts, as well as the only working Georgian dockyard in the world. Built in 1725, the UNESCO World Heritage Site, Nelson’s Dockyard, was led by the admiral Horatio Nelson himself and is a fascinating time warp. Hike up to viewpoints here, which reward with glorious views of the forest-clad inlets, craggy cliffs and pointed hills. The stone towers of sugar mills dot the island, and hint at the tragic history of slavery, amid the island’s sugar trade past.

Date 01/12/2022
Location Little bay
In
Out

As one of the Caribbean’s most dramatic islands, Montserrat has always done thing a little differently. While the rest of its neighbours were busy promoting tourism in its masses, Montserrat was content to sit back and stay in the (metaphorical) shadow. The island remains relatively undeveloped for the archipelago, with off the beaten path beaches, hidden creeks and so much natural beauty that we fully expect this little island to soon become the next go-to eco-tourism destination. View less

Much of Montserrat’s discretion is because it is governed by seismic activity and has endured more volcanic eruptions than any other Caribbean island. These have earned it the nickname the “Pompeii of the Caribbean”, understandably so, as much of the main city was covered in ash after the 1995 eruption. The cause of this is the mighty Soufriere Hills volcano, dormant since 2010 yet still spewing sulphur and smoke. However, it is not all doom and gloom and Monserrat’s other nickname is “the emerald isle”, is not only because of its lush verdant forests lined with lime trees and palms, but because its coasts bear a certain similarity to Ireland. And yes, Guinness is available! Montserratians are optimistic and fun loving and Little Bay locals are the perfect example. Set at the very tip of the island, the town is intended as the new capital, and is being enhanced with the modernity once would expect of such an honour. Little Bay beach is without doubt one of the most beautiful in Caribbean, and is a tonic for the soul.

Date 02/12/2022
Location Roseau, Dominica
In
Out

To fully appreciate the island’s unspoiled beauty, a trip into the interior is a must. A good part of Dominica’s mountainous terrain is covered with dense evergreen rain forest, where rare plants and animals are still found that have long been extinct on neighboring islands. The Smithsonian Institute called the island a giant plant laboratory, unchanged for 10,000 years. Numerous hot springs bear witness to continuing volcanic activity. Dominica is truly a place to discover nature in all her splendor. But it is not an island for those looking for white sand beaches. Around the mouth of rivers and in sheltered bays, the beaches are pebbly and of dark color.

Date 03/12/2022
Location St. Georges, Bermuda
In
Out

Located 508 miles due east of Cape Hatteras, the long, curving archipelago of more than one hundred islands comprises England’s well-heeled Crown Colony. The seven principal islands are linked by causeways and bridges which give the impression of one lush body of land surrounded by picturesque islets and reefs.

Date 04/12/2022
Location Bequia, St. Vincent And The Grenadines
In
Out

An almost mythical utopia of virgin beaches, rustic rum shacks and bays so scenic you feel like you’re intruding – Bequia Island is an island mirage of Caribbean perfection. This is the real, unspoiled experience – and with just 6,000 locals living here, you quickly start to recognise the same smiling faces, welcoming you with outstretched arms. Offering glorious – often deserted – beaches of pure golden sand, and hillside sweeps of forest and almond trees, Bequia Island is an extraordinary feast for the senses.

Unlike some of the flashier Caribbean islands, Bequia – a part of the Grenadines – is a rustic, unassuming and off-the-beaten-path choice. The staggeringly picturesque natural harbour, Admiralty Bay, greets you on arrival, and is peppered with day-tripping yachts bobbing on the gentle waves. The island’s tiny capital, Port Elizabeth, sits behind, with its bustling fruit and vegetable market, turtle sanctuary, and stalls selling hand-crafted model ships. This tiny, pretty island is ridged along the centre, and you can earn your beachside bliss with a gentle hike to the top of Mount Peggy, looking out over views of Grenada and St Vincent. At just seven miles long, you can discover the whole island in a few hours – but that would be to miss the point somewhat. Bequia Island coaxes you in to slow the pace and soothe your soul on blissful beaches, where you can revel in the uncomplicated joys of sitting, reading and swimming in heavenly shallow waters. The royally approved Princess Margaret Beach is one of the finest – an arching band of soft sand and cobalt-blue waters. As evening sets in, you may find you’re beckoned to share with communal barbecues of the day’s fresh catch with the locals, or to indulge in rum-heavy cocktails at beachside bars, lashed together from sea-blanched wooden limbs.

Date 05/12/2022
Location Bridgetown, Barbados
In
Out

Bridgetown, the captivating capital of Barbados, combines faded colonial history, captivating tradition, and vivid white beaches plucked directly from your richest imagination of Caribbean perfection. Recently listed as a UNESCO World Heritage site, thanks to its beautifully preserved colonial architecture, Bridgetown’s mask of modernity covers a core of complex history and fascinating culture. Sherbet coloured buildings line up to overlook the waterfront of the Constitution River at the ‘The Careenage’ – where gleaming ships bob on the blue water, and peaceful strolls along a wooden boardwalk await.

Stop for a sobering moment at the commemorative plaque honouring the people traded at this spot, when Bridgetown was the British Empire’s most important harbour, and first stop on the Transatlantic Slave Trade crossing. Just five minutes’ stroll from here is Carlisle Bay – a postcard-perfect place where you’ll find crystal-clear, turquoise seawater glowing in the Caribbean sun, and a mile of soft white powder sand. A treasure trove for divers, the shipwrecks scattered below the shallow water’s waves are now inhabited by turtles and swirling, rainbow-coloured tropical fish. Head to the backstreets, where street food vendors serve up spicy chicken soup, barbecued pigtails and thirst-quenching coconut water. There are bargains aplenty to be had on Broad Street, where duty-free malls and souvenir stalls cram together, vying for your attention. Roebuck Street is the spot where one of the Caribbean’s favourite drinks, rum, was discovered – having been created here from the by-products of the island’s booming sugarcane trade. Nowadays, it’s lined with bars splashing every variety of the deliciously spicy dark libation imaginable into glasses. For a touch more culture, visit one of the oldest synagogues in The Americas – Nidhe Israel Synagogue, which was built in 1654. The adjoining museum tells the story of Barbados’ Jewish immigrants, who were instrumental in the island’s development.

Date 06/12/2022
Location Kingstown
In 08:00
Out 18:00

Kingstown is the capital of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines. The port city is known for its Botanical Gardens, founded in 1765 and home to tropical plants and aviaries.

Date 07/12/2022
Location Castries, St Lucia
In 08:00
Out 22:00

Explore a land of vibrant colour, from the tranquil turquoise water that surrounds it, to the verdant green peaks of its famous soaring volcanic plugs – The Pitons; which give this mesmerising island its form. Waterfalls thunder in the jungled interior, should you successfully drag yourself from St Lucia’s gleaming beaches and dive spots – where patchworks of colourful fish dance below the waves. Offering the picturesque island luxury of your wildest dreams, St. Lucia is a cinematic, thrilling Caribbean idyl.

Marigot Bay served as the tropical backdrop for 1967’s Doctor Dolittle film, and the island’s amiable animal life is never too far away – spot flashes of bright red, as parrots zip between palm trees, before catching sight of dolphins splashing playfully offshore. Vigie beach is a charmed spot to lie back and recline in the sun’s glow, watching as overlapping layers of mesmerising blue hues intertwine. St. Lucia’s iconic Pitons mountains deliver as the perfect backdrop to any envy generating photograph – rising up exponentially from the calm waters like sharp shark fins. Castries is this heavenly island’s capital, and while the Cathedral Basilica of the Immaculate Conception may seem a little humble from the outside, the soft sounds of soulful hymns emanating from within are sure to draw you in. The astonishing interior glows with bright frescoes, lit up by the sunlight that spills inside, and atmospheric rows of flickering candles. There’s more rich Caribbean colour to behold at the ramshackle Castries Market, where you can take handfuls of fragrant spices, like nutmeg and cinnamon, and enjoy the singsong ritual of bartering, as you move between tables heaving under bounties of green bananas and rosy mangos.

Date 08/12/2022
Location At Sea
In
Out

Calling all skywatchers, umbraphiles and astronomers! Extremely rare and very exciting, a full solar eclipse is a bucket list experience if ever there was one. Scheduled for 4th December, 2021 the next eclipse will take place only in Antarctica and we will be positioned in the small path of totality for maximum effect. This experience is not available for the average cruisers; imagine being surrounded by brilliant light one minute, then complete blackout the next, before enjoying the mysterious shadow-play as we wind back to the blinding white of Antarctica.

Watch how the curious wildlife will react to the eclipse, making sure to note their behaviour and let the onboard naturalist know. Other onboard expedition staff will share their insightful knowledge in order to help you gain a better understanding of this phenomenal phenomenon. As if a trip to the seventh continent was not special enough!

Date 09/12/2022
Location Willemstad, Curacao
In 08:00
Out 23:00

Bright and brilliant colours coat the waterfront buildings of Willemstad, gleaming attractively below the generous Caribbean sun. The capital of the Carribean island Curacao, Willemstad is famous for its technicolour UNESCO World Heritage Site city centre, and a narrow channel connects the sea with the Schottegat harbour, which expands inland like a blooming flower. Settled by the Dutch in the 1630s, they brought colourful architecture, lavish red-roofed mansions, and gorgeous European-style waterfront buildings to this beautiful Caribbean island. View less

Watching over the entrance to this luxurious port is Rif Fort – a 19th-century fortress, which looms above the Sint Anna Bay channel. From here, wind your way to the Queen Emma Bridge – a pontoon bridge known as the Swinging Old Lady, which was built in 1888 to connect Otrobanda and Punda. Enjoy the wonderful views of Willemstad’s lavish, pastel-coloured Punda waterfront set before you. Visit the small boats that pull up side by side to sell juicy fruits and vegetables, in a floating market on the waters below. At sunset, the gingerbread stretch bathes in lights, glowing evocatively as the last of the evening’s light ebbs away. Wander Willemstad to discover the lemon-shaded Mikve Israel-Emanuel Synagogue, said to be the oldest synagogue in the Americas, see the historic liqueur distillery or head for Queen Wilhelmina Park – where the letters ‘DUSHI’ are spelt out in a standing sign. You’ll hear this word a lot – the island’s favourite way of describing the little things that make life worth living. The beaches of Curacao are certainly ‘dushi’, with tempting sandy curves on practically every corner. Snorkel in the turquoise waves, among dashing fish life and sleek sea turtles.

Date 10/12/2022
Location Oranjestad, Aruba
In 08:00
Out 23:00

Aruba, the smallest of the so-called ABC Islands, lies a mere 15 miles north of Venezuela. Like its sister islands, Bonaire and Curaçao, Aruba has scant vegetation. Its landscape consists mainly of scruffy bits of foliage, including cacti and the curious wind-bent divi-divi trees, huge boulders and interesting caves. The chief attractions are the magnificent beaches, turquoise waters and spectacular marine life, which lure scores of visitors each year to the island. Palm Beach is said to be one of the ten best beaches in the world. Here a string of hotels with glitzy casinos, restaurants and exotic boutiques line several miles of white sand beach. The crystal-clear waters are ideal for swimming and all kinds of watersports. If you prefer to stay dry, you may enjoy Aruba’s exotic underwater world on a submarine excursion.
Gold was discovered on the island in 1825, but by 1916 mining was no longer economical. In 1929 it was oil that brought prosperity to Aruba. A large refinery was built at the island’s eastern end, employing at that time over 8,000 people. When the refinery was closed in 1985, Arubans were forced to look for other sources of income, concentrating their efforts on the development of tourism. Today, education, housing and health care are largely financed by an economy based on tourism. Recognizing this fact, the island’s residents are sincere when they extend to visitors the greeting “Bonbini,” the native Papiamento word for “Welcome.”

Date 11/12/2022
Location At Sea
In
Out

Calling all skywatchers, umbraphiles and astronomers! Extremely rare and very exciting, a full solar eclipse is a bucket list experience if ever there was one. Scheduled for 4th December, 2021 the next eclipse will take place only in Antarctica and we will be positioned in the small path of totality for maximum effect. This experience is not available for the average cruisers; imagine being surrounded by brilliant light one minute, then complete blackout the next, before enjoying the mysterious shadow-play as we wind back to the blinding white of Antarctica.

Watch how the curious wildlife will react to the eclipse, making sure to note their behaviour and let the onboard naturalist know. Other onboard expedition staff will share their insightful knowledge in order to help you gain a better understanding of this phenomenal phenomenon. As if a trip to the seventh continent was not special enough!

Date 12/12/2022
Location Cartagena, Colombia
In 08:00
Out

On the crossroads of mighty cultures, this Murcian port has endless ancient stories to share. A valuable natural harbour attracted many civilisations to this sun-bathed, southeasterly setting – following its foundation by the Carthaginians in 227 BC. Blending the imprints left by countless cultures on this global junction, the presence of everyone from the Vandals to the Phoenicians and Moors can be felt as you explore, walking between ruins and celebrated modernist architecture along Calle Mayor.

Cartagena is crowned by the soaring Castillo de la Concepcion – rise to the stout castle aboard a panoramic lift. Inside, look through reams of archaeological treasures, or admire the rolling views down over the port and across the waters. Watch out for the electric blue peacocks who strut flamboyantly. Cartagena’s emergence as a visitor destination coincided with a stunning discovery in 1988 – the bowl of a gloriously preserved Roman Theatre. Enter to sit among the grandiose ancient venue, so evocative, you can’t help but imagine the historic performances that have graced its stage. Wander the breezy waterfront, looking across the narrow strait towards Africa’s distant haze, and spotting gleaming warships. Cartagena’s perfect harbour means it has been one of Spain’s oldest strategic navy positions since the 16th century. Settle to enjoy the joys of tapas in lively bars – sampling crisped paella, squid and honeyed-aubergine. Easter’s Semana Santa festivities are typically lively here, as hooded processions, lavish floats and sombre fiery displays roll through the streets.

Date 13/12/2022
Location Cartagena, Colombia
In
Out 12:30

On the crossroads of mighty cultures, this Murcian port has endless ancient stories to share. A valuable natural harbour attracted many civilisations to this sun-bathed, southeasterly setting – following its foundation by the Carthaginians in 227 BC. Blending the imprints left by countless cultures on this global junction, the presence of everyone from the Vandals to the Phoenicians and Moors can be felt as you explore, walking between ruins and celebrated modernist architecture along Calle Mayor.

Cartagena is crowned by the soaring Castillo de la Concepcion – rise to the stout castle aboard a panoramic lift. Inside, look through reams of archaeological treasures, or admire the rolling views down over the port and across the waters. Watch out for the electric blue peacocks who strut flamboyantly. Cartagena’s emergence as a visitor destination coincided with a stunning discovery in 1988 – the bowl of a gloriously preserved Roman Theatre. Enter to sit among the grandiose ancient venue, so evocative, you can’t help but imagine the historic performances that have graced its stage. Wander the breezy waterfront, looking across the narrow strait towards Africa’s distant haze, and spotting gleaming warships. Cartagena’s perfect harbour means it has been one of Spain’s oldest strategic navy positions since the 16th century. Settle to enjoy the joys of tapas in lively bars – sampling crisped paella, squid and honeyed-aubergine. Easter’s Semana Santa festivities are typically lively here, as hooded processions, lavish floats and sombre fiery displays roll through the streets.

Date 14/12/2022
Location Panama Canal Transit
In 05:30
Out 19:30

Enter the mighty Panama Canal, one of history’s most ambitious and spectacular stretches of waterway. Connecting the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, and slicing through the heart of a continent, the canal is a staggering engineering triumph, eliminating the need to traverse the treacherous waters of South America and Cape Horn. Sail one of the world’s great canals to appreciate the true scale of this achievement, as your ship manoeuvres between its vast, gushing locks and huge lakes. View less

The French began construction in 1881, but the costly project was left abandoned and unfinished until the United States finally completed the work in 1914. Following the path of the Panama Railway of 1855, locks raise ships large and small 26 metres up above sea level to the canal’s elevated channel. New locks have recently been added, which allow the canal to accommodate ever bigger ships. Leaving the confinement of the locks, you will enter the canal’s channel, to sail through Panama’s core. Wide lakes are linked by painstakingly chiselled wedges of canal, which slice through the lush scenery. Look out for the Culebra Cut section, the most challenging stretch of the entire route to construct. The Bridge of the Americas is a vast arched landmark, which sweeps across the Pacific Entrance and was completed in 1962. It’s one of several huge bridges that you will sail below on the 51-mile journey, including the much newer Centennial Bridge, and the Atlantic Bridge, which spans the entrance close to Colon.

Date 15/12/2022
Location At Sea
In
Out

Calling all skywatchers, umbraphiles and astronomers! Extremely rare and very exciting, a full solar eclipse is a bucket list experience if ever there was one. Scheduled for 4th December, 2021 the next eclipse will take place only in Antarctica and we will be positioned in the small path of totality for maximum effect. This experience is not available for the average cruisers; imagine being surrounded by brilliant light one minute, then complete blackout the next, before enjoying the mysterious shadow-play as we wind back to the blinding white of Antarctica.

Watch how the curious wildlife will react to the eclipse, making sure to note their behaviour and let the onboard naturalist know. Other onboard expedition staff will share their insightful knowledge in order to help you gain a better understanding of this phenomenal phenomenon. As if a trip to the seventh continent was not special enough!

Date 16/12/2022
Location Manta, Ecuador
In 08:00
Out 17:30

Manta is one of Ecuador’s ports along the central coast and the most populated city in Manabi Province. Its existence can be traced to pre-Columbian times when Manta was a trading post for the Incas and Mantas. It was also the port where Charles Marie de La Condamine arrived, leading the French mission to measure the location of the equator in 1735.

Date 17/12/2022
Location Guayaquil, Ecuador
In 08:30
Out 18:00

The second major jumping off point for the Galapagos Islands after Quito, this is a little city with a big heart. A sea port first and foremost, the city’s personality has been founded on that, and all the better it is for it too. Almost Caribbean in feeling, the clement climate coupled with the intermingling rhythms floating from the windows and abundance of fresh seafood make this a very tropical destination. View less

Once not even considered by the travel books as a potential destination in its own right, the city has undergone something of a resurgence in the past few years. Proud Guayaquileños will not hestitate to point out the Malecón or the exciting new riverfront promenade, once a no-go area after dark, now happily (and hippily) lined with museums, restaurants, shops, and ongoing entertainment. The new airport and urban transportation network are also lauded to the happy tourists who find themselves here. As the largest and most populous city in Ecuador as well as being the commercial centre, it would only be natural that the city would have some kind of modern architecture, but it is the colourful favelas, or to use their real name guasmos, that cling to the side of the hillside like limpets that really catch your eye. A blend of old and new, the first inhabitants can be traced back to 1948 when the government cleared the area for affordable housing, these shanty towns are witness to the social and political particularities that Guayaquil has faced in the past.

Date 18/12/2022
Location At Sea
In
Out

Calling all skywatchers, umbraphiles and astronomers! Extremely rare and very exciting, a full solar eclipse is a bucket list experience if ever there was one. Scheduled for 4th December, 2021 the next eclipse will take place only in Antarctica and we will be positioned in the small path of totality for maximum effect. This experience is not available for the average cruisers; imagine being surrounded by brilliant light one minute, then complete blackout the next, before enjoying the mysterious shadow-play as we wind back to the blinding white of Antarctica.

Watch how the curious wildlife will react to the eclipse, making sure to note their behaviour and let the onboard naturalist know. Other onboard expedition staff will share their insightful knowledge in order to help you gain a better understanding of this phenomenal phenomenon. As if a trip to the seventh continent was not special enough!

Date 19/12/2022
Location Salaverry, Peru
In 08:00
Out 17:00

Salaverry is the port for Trujillo, Peru’s third largest city. Located about nine hours north of Lima, Trujillo was founded in 1534 by the Spanish conquistador Pizarro. The attractive, colonial city retains much of its original charm with elegant casonas, or mansions, lining the streets.

Date 20/12/2022
Location Lima, Peru
In 12:00
Out

Splashing colour and culture into the arid Peruvian landscape, Lima is a city bedecked with grand colonial splendour. Founded in 1535, this sprawling capital enjoys a breezy oceanfront location and forms one of the world’s largest desert cities. A place of sharp contrasts, almost 10 million people are packed into the city, occupying vastly different living conditions. Visit for an unfiltered experience of this richly layered place of ancient history, colonial relics and dazzling flavours. View less

Rising from the misty blanket of the garua – a persistent fog that cloaks Lima during winter – you’ll find one of South America’s most culturally vibrant cities. The former capital of the Spanish colonists – head to Plaza de Armas to immerse yourself in the heart of the old city. The Basilica Cathedral of Lima watches over Plaza Mayor – listen out for the stomps of boots outside, as the pomp and ceremony of the Changing of the Guards draws crowds to the Government Palace. The history of this area runs much deeper, however, and pre-Colombian cities and temples emerge from the dusty earth nearby. Grand museums showcase unearthed treasures from the extraordinary civilisations who built vast mud adobe cities across Peru’s coastline, and incredible settlements in the country’s valleys and mountains. The Barranco district is Lima’s artsy area, and you can walk from modern art galleries to see the local muse, the Bridge of Sighs. This wooden bridge is an artist’s favourite, and one of the city’s most romantic spots. Afterwards, sample some of Lima’s cuisine, and the zingy flavours of spicy, lime-marinated fish ceviche. So revered in these parts, ceviche even has its own national day on June 28th. Sipping a Pisco Sour is the perfect way to round off your visit to this engrossing, multi-layered city.

Date 21/12/2022
Location Lima, Peru
In
Out

Splashing colour and culture into the arid Peruvian landscape, Lima is a city bedecked with grand colonial splendour. Founded in 1535, this sprawling capital enjoys a breezy oceanfront location and forms one of the world’s largest desert cities. A place of sharp contrasts, almost 10 million people are packed into the city, occupying vastly different living conditions. Visit for an unfiltered experience of this richly layered place of ancient history, colonial relics and dazzling flavours. View less

Rising from the misty blanket of the garua – a persistent fog that cloaks Lima during winter – you’ll find one of South America’s most culturally vibrant cities. The former capital of the Spanish colonists – head to Plaza de Armas to immerse yourself in the heart of the old city. The Basilica Cathedral of Lima watches over Plaza Mayor – listen out for the stomps of boots outside, as the pomp and ceremony of the Changing of the Guards draws crowds to the Government Palace. The history of this area runs much deeper, however, and pre-Colombian cities and temples emerge from the dusty earth nearby. Grand museums showcase unearthed treasures from the extraordinary civilisations who built vast mud adobe cities across Peru’s coastline, and incredible settlements in the country’s valleys and mountains. The Barranco district is Lima’s artsy area, and you can walk from modern art galleries to see the local muse, the Bridge of Sighs. This wooden bridge is an artist’s favourite, and one of the city’s most romantic spots. Afterwards, sample some of Lima’s cuisine, and the zingy flavours of spicy, lime-marinated fish ceviche. So revered in these parts, ceviche even has its own national day on June 28th. Sipping a Pisco Sour is the perfect way to round off your visit to this engrossing, multi-layered city.

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