Enquire Now

Home Cruises British Isles & Western Europe Seabourn Ovation 2023-04-23

British Isles & Western Europe - 8335A Seabourn Ovation departing 23 Apr 2023

Call now 01246 819 819 to book

Seabourn Ovation
Ship
Cruise Line
Embark
23 Apr 2023
Duration
26 Nights
From / To
Dover / Dover
Ports of call
Dover - Cherbourg - St Malo (Le Mont Saint Michel), France - Ferrol - Gijon

Suite from Call for fares

Enquire Now

Itinerary

Show sea days

Date Date
Location Location
 
In In
Out Out
Date 23/04/2023
Location Dover
In
Out

Crossing the English Channel from continental Europe to Great Britain, the first view of England is the milky-white strip of land called the White Cliffs of Dover. As you get closer, the coastline unfolds before you in all its striking beauty. White chalk cliffs with streaks of black flint rise straight from the sea to a height of 350’ (110 m).

Numerous archaeological finds reveal people were present in the area during the Stone Age. Yet the first record of Dover is from Romans, who valued its close proximity to the mainland. A mere 21 miles (33 km) separate Dover from the closest point in France. A Roman-built lighthouse in the area is the tallest Roman structure still standing in Britain. The remains of a Roman villa with the only preserved Roman wall mural outside of Italy are another unique survivor from ancient times which make Dover one of a kind.

Date 24/04/2023
Location Cherbourg
In
Out

The seaport and naval station of Cherbourg is situated along the English Channel northwest of Paris at the mouth of the Divette River. Believed to rest on the site of an ancient Roman station, Cherbourg has been occupied since ancient times and was frequently contested by the French and English in the Middle Ages because of its strategic location. Most recently passed to France in the late 18th century, the town was extensively fortified by Louis XVI. During WWII the Germans held Cherbourg until it was captured by the American forces shortly after the Normandy landings. Following a vast rehabilitation program that returned it to working condition, Cherbourg became an important Allied supply port. Today, Cherbourg is important for transatlantic shipping, shipbuilding, electronics and telephone equipment manufacturing, yachting and commercial fishing.

Date 25/04/2023
Location St Malo (Le Mont Saint Michel), France
In
Out

Saint-Malo is a port city in Brittany, in France’s northwest. Tall granite walls surround the old town, which was once a stronghold for privateers (pirates approved by the king). The Saint-Malo Cathedral, in the center of the old town, is built in Romanesque and Gothic styles and features stained-glass windows depicting city history. Nearby is La Demeure de Corsaire, an 18th-century privateer’s house and museum.

Date 26/04/2023
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 27/04/2023
Location Ferrol
In
Out

Ferrol is a city in the Province of A Coruña in Galicia, on the Atlantic coast in north-western Spain, in the vicinity of Strabo’s Cape Nerium. According to the 2016 census, the city has a population of 66,065, making it the seventh largest settlement in Galicia.

Date 28/04/2023
Location Gijon
In
Out

This ancient port city on the green Atlantic coast of Spain has a history of some 3,000 years. From its humble beginnings the city has grown to become an important port city in Spain. Its old historic fishing village Cimadevilla with its picturesque cobble stoned streets and old-world architecture remains today its main tourist attraction.

Date 29/04/2023
Location Bilbao
In
Out

Straddling the banks of an estuary opening into the Bay of Biscay, Bilbao is the largest city in Spain’s northeastern Basque Country. Its earliest beginnings are preserved in the Casco Viejo, seven medieval streets that used to be guarded by walls. There visitors will find the city’s old churches, a large market, a public theater and the Academy of the Basque Language. Nearby sources of iron ore made Bilbao an important industrial and shipping center from the 14th century onward. The Spanish Civil War also started here. Today the city is being transformed by a growing service economy, and its prominence on the global traveler’s radar may be dated from the 1997 inauguration of the striking Frank Gehry-designed Guggenheim Museum Bilbao. In fact, the estuary town has become a veritable magnet for architects, boasting notable masterworks including Santiago Calatrava’s beautiful Zubizuri (“White Bridge” in Basque) and airport complex, the 541-foot Iberdrola Tower by the Argentine Cesar Pelli, a subway system by Norman Foster, the 1909 wine warehouse called Alhóndiga, converted a century later by designer Philippe Starck and the Euskalduna Conference Centre and Concert Hall by Federico Soriano and Dolores Palacios. The Zorrozuarre area is also being redeveloped, following a 2007 master plan by the Iraqi architect Zaha Hadid. For views of all of this, take the funicular from the city center to the top of Mt. Artxanda, where a sports complex, restaurants and a balcony await you.

Date 30/04/2023
Location Hendaye
In
Out

Smaller than its neighbors St-Jean-de-Luz or Biarritz, Hendaye forms the political border between France and Spain on the Cote Basque, where the Pyrenees come down to meet the Atlantic. Politics aside, the whole area is culturally Basque, and the Basque language and flag are frequently heard and seen. Biarritz benefitted from the presence of the Empress Eugenie of France, who built a palace on the beach there in 1854 that survives as the Hotel du Palais. That attracted Europe’s crowned heads and secured its reputation as a seaside resort.

Date 01/05/2023
Location La Rochelle
In
Out

La Rochelle is a coastal city in southwestern France and capital of the Charente-Maritime department. It’s been a center for fishing and trade since the 12th century, a maritime tradition that’s reflected in its Vieux Port (old harbor) and huge, modern Les Minimes marina. The old town has half-timbered medieval houses and Renaissance architecture, including passageways covered by 17th-century arches.

Date 02/05/2023
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 03/05/2023
Location Portsmouth
In
Out

Portsmouth is a port city and naval base on England’s south coast, mostly spread across Portsea Island. It’s known for its maritime heritage and Portsmouth Historic Dockyard. The dockyard is home to the interactive National Museum of the Royal Navy, the wooden warship HMS Victory, where Nelson died in the Battle of Trafalgar, and HMS Warrior 1860. The Tudor ship Mary Rose is also conserved in a dockyard museum.

Date 04/05/2023
Location Zeebrugge
In
Out

Zeebrugge is a Belgian port and seaside resort. It’s linked to the city of Bruges by the Baudouin Canal. The old fish market in the marina houses Seafront, a theme park focusing on the local seafaring and fishing heritage. Exhibits include a Russian submarine. In nearby Knokke-Heist, the For Freedom Museum evokes the area’s WWII history through dioramas. West along the coast are the De Fonteintjes wetland and dunes.

Date 05/05/2023
Location Dover
In
Out

Crossing the English Channel from continental Europe to Great Britain, the first view of England is the milky-white strip of land called the White Cliffs of Dover. As you get closer, the coastline unfolds before you in all its striking beauty. White chalk cliffs with streaks of black flint rise straight from the sea to a height of 350’ (110 m).

Numerous archaeological finds reveal people were present in the area during the Stone Age. Yet the first record of Dover is from Romans, who valued its close proximity to the mainland. A mere 21 miles (33 km) separate Dover from the closest point in France. A Roman-built lighthouse in the area is the tallest Roman structure still standing in Britain. The remains of a Roman villa with the only preserved Roman wall mural outside of Italy are another unique survivor from ancient times which make Dover one of a kind.

Date 06/05/2023
Location Cherbourg
In
Out

The seaport and naval station of Cherbourg is situated along the English Channel northwest of Paris at the mouth of the Divette River. Believed to rest on the site of an ancient Roman station, Cherbourg has been occupied since ancient times and was frequently contested by the French and English in the Middle Ages because of its strategic location. Most recently passed to France in the late 18th century, the town was extensively fortified by Louis XVI. During WWII the Germans held Cherbourg until it was captured by the American forces shortly after the Normandy landings. Following a vast rehabilitation program that returned it to working condition, Cherbourg became an important Allied supply port. Today, Cherbourg is important for transatlantic shipping, shipbuilding, electronics and telephone equipment manufacturing, yachting and commercial fishing.

Date 07/05/2023
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 08/05/2023
Location Bristol
In
Out

Known as ‘the city of the seven hills,’ Bristol’s characteristic landscape of rolling hills, softened by the curves of the Avon River, is easily recognizable. Its key landmarks include the Clifton Suspension Bridge spanning the Avon Gorge and the 878-year-old, 300′ (90 m) Bristol Cathedral towering above the old town. The stone structures of historic Bristol University with their awe-inspiring pillars, statues and fountains stand in stark contrast to the many ultra-modern buildings. Cabot Tower, built to commemorate the 400th anniversary of John Cabot’s 1497 voyage to the New World, stands on Brandon Hill. Though Bristol sustained significant damage during WWII, it remains a unique mixture of Victorian, Georgian, and post-war architecture.

It was the Romans who first noted the area’s mild climate and built a number of villas along the Frome and Avon rivers. Bristol enjoys more sunshine than most of England and is one of the country’s warmest cities.

Date 09/05/2023
Location Fishguard
In
Out

Fishguard’s name in Welsh is Abergwaun, meaning the mouth of the River Gwaun. The English name comes from an Old Norse word for a fish trap, and indeed the community has profited from catching and drying herring for centuries. It has remained remarkably unchanged physically over the years. The waterfront has a traditional feel like many others in Pembrokeshire. At first glance, nothing would indicate that this is the site of the last invasion of Britain by a foreign power. But a bicentenary stone recalls the day in 1797 when 1400 French revolutionary troops landed here, only to be routed by the local folk, including a heroic woman shoemaker named Jemima Nicholas, who rounded up more than a dozen dismayed invaders while armed with a pitchfork. A large tapestry depicting the struggle is on display in the Fishguard Town Hall. The surrounding South Wales countryside is dotted with medieval castles, some impressive, such as Pembroke and Picton Castles, and others little more than scenically sited ruins. Cardigan also has a notable garden called Dyffryn Fernant, and St. David’s boasts an impressive early cathedral and a Bishop’s Palace. Prehistoric Pembrokeshire is represented by the Pentre Ifan Burial Chamber, a massive dolmen with an intact 15-ton capstone made of the same type of rock that formed the inner sanctum of Stonehenge.

Date 10/05/2023
Location Liverpool
In
Out

Primarily an industrial port city, Liverpool grew to prominence as a result of trade with the Americas in the 1700s. The tradition of exporting goods much desired in the Americas (and elsewhere) from Liverpool continued at least until the 1960s, when the Beatles became the most famous commodity ever to reach the “Colonies.” Aside from its role as a port city, Liverpool is home to one of the largest provincial universities in the United Kingdom, educating students since 1903. Architecture buffs will find a number of notable edifices well worth exploring. Two outstanding examples of classical architecture, St. George’s Hall and the Town Hall, rank among the most beautiful in the world. The striking Anglican Liverpool Cathedral is the largest Anglican church in Britain.

Date 11/05/2023
Location Isle of Man
In
Out

Douglas is the capital of the Isle of Man. Mann, as it is also called, is a British Crown Dependency, with its own parliament and postage stamps (a popular souvenir). Here visitors can sample means of transport ranging from horse-drawn trams, to steam trains and the high-speed motorcycles that compete in the renowned Isle of Man TT races. In summer the town maintains much of the seaside resort charm of an earlier period, including the Victorian-era Grand Union Camera Obscura, now restored for your amusement.

Date 12/05/2023
Location Londonderry
In
Out

Beside the River Foyle in Northern Ireland, Derry is still surrounded by its seven-gated, 17th Century city walls. The spired St. Columb cathedral within the walls has exhibits about the extended siege the city endured in the 17th Century. The Peace Bridge is a modern monument to more modern troubles. The Tower Museum exhibits local history and affords views of the town and the red sandstone 1890 Guildhall nearby. On a hill outside the walls stands the 2,000-year-old Grianan of Aileach ringfort.

Date 13/05/2023
Location Portree (Isle of Skye), UK
In
Out

Patras is the largest city in the Peloponnese as well as the capital of Greece’s Achaia region. Dominated by the castle at the top of a hill, Patras is divided into two parts. The older section, at the foot of the castle, features a number of appealing neoclassical houses, while the lower city offers numerous mansions which house the Municipal Theater and the Odeon among them.Perhaps foremost of the city’s attractions is the Cathedral of St. Andrew, rising majestically over the lower city. Less secular in nature are the many delightful cafes, pastry shops and tavernas to be found along the busy streets.

Date 14/05/2023
Location Scrabster
In
Out

Scrabster is a small settlement on Thurso Bay in Caithness on the north coast of Scotland. It is some 1 ¹⁄₂ miles from Thurso, 22 ¹⁄₂ miles from Wick, 112 miles from Inverness and 271.7 miles from Edinburgh. Scrabster Harbour is an important port for the Scottish fishing industry

Date 15/05/2023
Location Invergordon (Inverness)
In
Out

Invergordon, the port for Inverness, is located in the northern part of Scotland on the Moray Firth. The quaint town of Inverness has reminders of such historical figures as St. Columba, Mary Queen of Scots, and Oliver Cromwell. Its attractions include a 17th-century clock tower, part of a fort erected by Cromwell’s army and the 19th-century cathedral. Regarded as the “Capital of the Highlands,” the town holds many traditional Scottish events each summer.

Date 16/05/2023
Location Edinburgh
In
Out

Newhaven, about two miles north of the Edinburgh city center on the Firth of Forth, is an historic harbor from which to visit Scotland’s stately capital. Once an important fishing and shipbuilding community, Newhaven is a conservation area with unique vernacular architecture using a forestair to access a house’s first floor living area, above a ground floor traditionally used for storing nets. The town’s Victoria Primary School is the oldest operating primary school in the United Kingdom. Edinburgh is perennially listed among the most attractive and interesting cities in Europe. Its patrician skyline bristles with steeples and spires between the Castle Rock and Carlton Hill. Both the Old Town and New Town are inscribed by UNESCO as World Heritage Sites. The city’s seven hills guard an immensely rich heritage of architectural and historic buildings, districts and streets to delight visitors. Edinburgh Castle, Holyrood Palace, the Royal Mile and the Princes Street Gardens area are world-renowned. The noble Scottish National Parliament, City Chambers, Law Courts and Scottish National Gallery are equally prestigious sights. A university city, Edinburgh nurtures a vibrant arts and cultural community, a spirited nightlife and a burgeoning culinary scene. A year-round agenda of celebrated festivals add further appeal for visitors.

Date 17/05/2023
Location Newcastle upon Tyne
In
Out

Newcastle upon Tyne, clinging to the north bank of the River Tyne, grew around the Roman settlement Pons Aelius and was named after the castle built here in 1080 by William the Conqueror’s eldest son, Robert Curthose. The port developed in the 16th century, quickly becoming one of the world’s largest shipbuilding centers. Newcastle harbors a spirited mix of heritage and urban sophistication.

Among its ultra-modern structures, is the beautiful refined curve of the Gateshead Millennium suspension bridge, one of seven major bridges that cross The Tyne. The modern reflective, spherical-profile of the Sage Gateshead Concert Hall contrasts greatly with the distinguished vertical columns of the traditional-style Theatre Royal, located in Grainger Town, the historic center of Newcastle.

Date 18/05/2023
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 19/05/2023
Location Dover
In
Out

Crossing the English Channel from continental Europe to Great Britain, the first view of England is the milky-white strip of land called the White Cliffs of Dover. As you get closer, the coastline unfolds before you in all its striking beauty. White chalk cliffs with streaks of black flint rise straight from the sea to a height of 350’ (110 m).

Numerous archaeological finds reveal people were present in the area during the Stone Age. Yet the first record of Dover is from Romans, who valued its close proximity to the mainland. A mere 21 miles (33 km) separate Dover from the closest point in France. A Roman-built lighthouse in the area is the tallest Roman structure still standing in Britain. The remains of a Roman villa with the only preserved Roman wall mural outside of Italy are another unique survivor from ancient times which make Dover one of a kind.

*

Chat Online

Click the live chat icon to speak with an agent today

Request a Callback

Let us call you back at a time to suit you. » Request a callback now.

Join the Cruise Club

Sign up today and join the UK’s favourite Cruise Club. » Join the Cruise Club.

Find a Cruise

Search 1000s of cruises for your next holiday. » Search for a cruise.

Enquire Now

Enquire Now

Please call 01246 819 819 to book this cruise