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Home Cruises Civitavecchia (Rome) to Southampton Silver Dawn 2023-04-23

Civitavecchia (Rome) to Southampton - DA230423C24 Silver Dawn departing 23 Apr 2023

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Silver Dawn
Ship
Cruise Line
Embark
23 Apr 2023
Duration
24 Nights
From / To
Rome (Civitavecchia) / Southampton
Ports of call
Rome (Civitavecchia) - Menton - Toulon - Barcelona - Barcelona See full itinerary

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Itinerary

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Date Date
Location Location
 
In In
Out Out
Date 23/04/2023
Location Rome (Civitavecchia)
In
Out 23:00

All roads lead to Rome, and with good reason – this city is one of the world’s most thrilling, offering unmatched history along every street. An evocative, inspiring and utterly artistic capital of unrivalled cultural impact, Rome is a city of back-to-back landmarks, which will take you on an exhilarating journey through the ages. This may be one of the world’s oldest cities, but it’s well and truly lived in. The ruins are punctuated with murmuring cafes, and the outdoor seating of restaurants sprawls out across piazzas, enticing you to sample tangles of creamy pasta and crispy pizzas. Rome’s incredible Roman Forum is littered with the ruins of its ancient administrations, which have stood firm for 2,000 years, since the times when the area was the centre of the Western world. Few sites are more simultaneously beautiful and haunting than that of the storied Colosseum, which looms deep into Rome’s rich blue sky. Take a tour to learn details of the grisly goings-on within. The best way to experience Rome is to wander its streets, gelato in hand. There is a lot to see here – whether it’s the domed spectacle of the Pantheon, or the elaborate flowing waters and artistry of the Trevi Fountain. Vatican City is an astonishing, colossal display of Catholic grandeur, while the Spanish Steps – crowned by the Trinità dei Monti church – offer a beautiful spot to gather and soak up the lively atmosphere of this humming city. With so much on the to-do list, you’ll relish the breaks you take, enjoying simple pleasures like a strong espresso, or fresh pasta with tomato sauce and ripped basil.

Date 24/04/2023
Location At Sea
In 08:00
Out 18:00

A summer escape for Rome’s historic elite, the stacked waterfront of Porto Santo Stefano is a secluded taste of idyllic southern Tuscany. Physically closer to Rome than Florence, the city is strung to Italy’s western coast by two sandy harnesses, and sits on the unqiue peninsula of Monte Argentario – which was once an island. Flamboyant pink flamingos and herons stroll through the encased lagoon, while Porto Santo Stefano’s waterfront hums with clinking cafes and strolling visitors. View less

The luxury yachts in the harbour show that Porto Santo Stefano has lost none of its luxury appeals, and with beaches, wild hikes and waterfront beauty, it continues to lure visitors to this secluded escape. Known for its fishing and cuisine – which is based around heavy use of the Tyrrhenian Sea’s juicy bounty. Stroll to Piazza dei Rioni for a dripping lemon gelato, or wander the streets noticing the lingering World War II damage – the city was heavily bombed during the conflict. Fortunately, the historic, star-shaped, Spanish fort was spared, and it still watches out resolutely over the waters. Built during the Napoleonic Wars, it fortified the exposed town against pirate raids, and offers beautiful views over the old town’s terracotta roofs. Rugged coastline falls to secluded beaches, with a wilder, unkempt charm. Sail the coves – seeing cascading olive groves – or island-hop to Giglio and Giannuti, which lie 12 miles from shore, and can be seen from the monastery topped Argentario mountain. On the other side of the promontory, you’ll find Porto Ercole – where the lifeless body of the Old Master, Caravaggio, was discovered.

Date 25/04/2023
Location Menton
In 08:00
Out 23:00

Surrounded by the Côte d’Azur and the Ligurian Alps, this charming town full of mystery first appeared in the 12th century. At this time Menton belonged to the Vento family of Genoa.

In 1346, Menton was under ownership of Charles Grimaldi, Lord of Monaco. From hence, Menton’s history became intertwined with that of the principality of Monaco. In 1848, Menton broke away from the principality and proclaimed itself a free city under the protection of Sarde. Menton chose to become part of France in 1860 and Charles III of Monaco released all rights of the city to Emperor Napoléon III. Menton became part of the Alps-Maritimes department.

Date 26/04/2023
Location Toulon
In 08:30
Out 18:00

Built around a sheltered bay, with 1,700-foot Mount Faron as an impressive backdrop, Toulon is an important naval port and a city of industry and manufacturing. Its large harbor serves as the base for the French navy’s Mediterranean fleet and as the home to a sizeable marina, with yachts and pleasure boats adding bright splashes of color.
Toulon was the site where Napoleon Bonaparte first made a name for himself in 1793 during a siege in which the English, who had taken over Toulon, were expelled.
During World War II, the bulk of the French fleet anchored off Toulon was scuttled by French crews to prevent its acquisition by occupying German forces. The city was liberated in 1944 by French troops.
A maze of pedestrian streets constitutes the heart of old Toulon. Shops and colorful stalls make it an attractive area to explore. Avenue de la République runs parallel to the waterfront. At the western edge of the quay is the Naval Museum featuring an excellent collection of old and new ship models, figureheads, paintings and other items related to Toulon’s maritime history.
The town’s attractions can be seen in a fairly short time. Most visitors come here to explore the hinterland and other parts of the Riviera.

Date 27/04/2023
Location Barcelona
In 08:00
Out

The infinite variety of street life, the nooks and crannies of the medieval Barri Gòtic, the ceramic tile and stained glass of Art Nouveau facades, the art and music, the throb of street life, the food (ah, the food!)—one way or another, Barcelona will find a way to get your full attention. The capital of Catalonia is a banquet for the senses, with its beguiling mix of ancient and modern architecture, tempting cafés and markets, and sun-drenched Mediterranean beaches.

A stroll along La Rambla and through waterfront Barceloneta, as well as a tour of Gaudí’s majestic Sagrada Famíliaand his other unique creations, are part of a visit to Spain’s second-largest city. Modern art museums and chic shops call for attention, too. Barcelona’s vibe stays lively well into the night, when you can linger over regional wine and cuisine at buzzing tapas bars.

Date 28/04/2023
Location Barcelona
In
Out 18:00

The infinite variety of street life, the nooks and crannies of the medieval Barri Gòtic, the ceramic tile and stained glass of Art Nouveau facades, the art and music, the throb of street life, the food (ah, the food!)—one way or another, Barcelona will find a way to get your full attention. The capital of Catalonia is a banquet for the senses, with its beguiling mix of ancient and modern architecture, tempting cafés and markets, and sun-drenched Mediterranean beaches.

A stroll along La Rambla and through waterfront Barceloneta, as well as a tour of Gaudí’s majestic Sagrada Famíliaand his other unique creations, are part of a visit to Spain’s second-largest city. Modern art museums and chic shops call for attention, too. Barcelona’s vibe stays lively well into the night, when you can linger over regional wine and cuisine at buzzing tapas bars.

Date 29/04/2023
Location Valencia
In 08:00
Out 18:00

Valencia is Spain’s third largest city and capital of the region. It was originally founded by the Romans on the banks of the river Turia in 138 BC. In 711 AD the Moors arrived and converted the area into a rich agricultural and industrial center, establishing ceramics, paper, silk and leather industries. Muslim rule was briefly interrupted in 1094 by the legendary Castillian knight, El Cid. Valencia boomed in the 15th and 16th centuries, becoming one of the strongest Mediterranean trading centers.
Valencia is a vibrant, friendly and chaotic city that boasts an outstanding fine arts museum and one of the most exciting nightlife scenes in Spain. The city center is about 3 miles inland from the coast. Plaza del Ayuntamiento marks the center of Valencia. Surrounded by flower stalls, it is also home to the town hall and the main post office. The cathedral was begun in the 13th century and finished in 1482. It has many architectural styles, including Gothic, Baroque and Romanesque. The octagonal bell-tower, called Miguelete, is one of the city’s landmarks. The small cathedral museum boasts a tabernacle made from 550 pounds of gold, silver, platinum, emeralds and sapphires. It also purports to be the home of the Holy Grail, the cup used by Christ at the Last Supper.
West of the cathedral is the oldest part of the city, known as El Carme. Situated across the river in the Jardines del Real is the Museo de Bellas Artes, the Fine Arts Museum. Works include those by El Greco, Goya and Velázquez.

Date 30/04/2023
Location Palma
In 08:00
Out 19:00

The Balearics are comprised of 16 islands; the three principal ones are Mallorca, Ibiza and Minorca. Carthaginians, Romans, Vandals and Arabs have invaded these islands over the centuries. Ruins show evidence of the prehistoric Talayot civilization, a megalithic culture that flourished here between 1500 BC and the Roman conquest. Today the islands are besieged by invaders of a different sort – hordes of tourists.
Lying 60 miles (97 km) off the Spanish mainland, the islands’ lush and rugged landscape combined with an extremely mild, sunny climate proves irresistible, especially to northern Europeans. As a result, the Balearics boast cosmopolitan resorts with lively nightlife and plenty of sports activities.
Mallorca (also spelled Majorca) is the largest of the islands, with an area of more than 1,400 square miles (3626 sq.km). The scenery is magnificent, with cliffs along indented shorelines jutting out of the sea and mountain ranges sheltering the plains from harsh sea breezes. The fertile plain in the centre is covered with almond and fig trees plus olive groves with some trees more than 1,000 years old. Tall pines, junipers and oaks line the mountain slopes.
Palma de Mallorca is the capital of the archipelago. A cosmopolitan city with sophisticated shops and restaurants, it also offers buildings of spectacular Moorish and Gothic architecture.
In the western part of Mallorca, nestled into the mountains, lies the village of Valldemosa. It is known for its Carthusian Monastery where Frédéric Chopin and George Sand spent the winter of 1838-39.

Date 01/05/2023
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 02/05/2023
Location Malaga
In 08:00
Out 19:00

Bathing in the sunshine coast’s stunning subtropical climate, and laying out endless spectacular beaches, it’s no surprise that Malaga is one of Spain’s most popular cities. The already impressive cultural appeal of this holiday city has skyrocketed over recent years, and with a storied old town and Moorish fortifications, Malaga has a lot to offer. Nearby, you can recline on the renowned beaches of the Costa del Sol, or venture inland to discover the Moorish treasures of Granada and Cordoba. View less

La Malagueta beach is Malaga’s spacious urban beach, perfect for a sunbathe and a dip in the warm water, before enjoying seaside cocktails or seafood tapas in the restaurants nearby. Malaga and the Costa del Sol may be best known for glorious weather and beaches, but Malaga can now stake a genuine claim as an artistic powerhouse too. Visit the renowned Picasso museum – housed in the artist’s birthplace – before exploring the freshly opened outpost of the Pompidou Centre. The art also spills out onto the streets in the colourful Soho district – splashed with vibrant street paintings. Known as La Manquita – or the one-armed woman – the city’s cathedral rises over the historic old town. Its huge bell tower stands tall, but an accompanying second tower was never completed – hence the nickname. The Alcazaba fortress palace looms over the waterfront and forms a spectacularly preserved remnant from the era when the Moors controlled the Andalucía region. Discover more of the Arabic influence by visiting Granada’s Alhambra palace, or Cordoba’s La Mezquita mosque. Together with Seville’s converted cathedral, the cities form Andalucía’s Golden Triangle of Moorish wonders.

Date 03/05/2023
Location Seville
In 08:00
Out

More than a hundred watchtowers gaze out across the waves surrounding this ancient Andalusian city. Sprinkled with evocative cobbled side streets, you’ll explore 3,000 years’ worth of history, while stumbling across palm-tree lined plazas of shaded coffee sippers. Cadiz claims the mantle of Western Europe’s oldest city, and every piece of architecture – and every wrong turn – offers a chance to discover fascinating new tales. Founded by the Phoenicians in 1100BC, Christopher Columbus used the city as a base for his exploratory, map-defining voyages of 1493 and 1502.

The port grew in importance and wealth as Cadiz’s strategic location close to Africa’s northern tip helped it blossom into a centre for New World trade. Catedral de Cádiz, is a display of the city’s wealth and importance, looming spectacularly over the Atlantic’s waves, with cawing seagulls sweeping between its twin bell towers. Inside, treasures from the city’s trading exploits in the West Indies and beyond – which helped fuel the growth of this historically prosperous city – are on display. Enveloped by ocean on almost every side, Cadiz has something of an island feel, and you can cool off from southern Spain’s unrelenting sunshine on the sweeping golden sand beach of Playa Victoria. The two towers of the new El Puente de la Constitución de 1812 mark a contemporary landmark in this most ancient of cities, in the form of a spectacular new road bridge. Torre Tavira, meanwhile, is the most famous of Cadiz’s army of watchtowers, and the highest point in the city. Reach the top for a view of the ocean fringing the city’s expanse, and to learn about the towers – constructed so trading merchants could survey the harbour from their lavish homes. The Central Market is a chaotic place of bartering, where flashing knives dissect fresh fish. Stop in at the orbiting bars to enjoy tapas, freshly prepared with the market’s produce.

Date 04/05/2023
Location Seville
In
Out 13:30

More than a hundred watchtowers gaze out across the waves surrounding this ancient Andalusian city. Sprinkled with evocative cobbled side streets, you’ll explore 3,000 years’ worth of history, while stumbling across palm-tree lined plazas of shaded coffee sippers. Cadiz claims the mantle of Western Europe’s oldest city, and every piece of architecture – and every wrong turn – offers a chance to discover fascinating new tales. Founded by the Phoenicians in 1100BC, Christopher Columbus used the city as a base for his exploratory, map-defining voyages of 1493 and 1502.

The port grew in importance and wealth as Cadiz’s strategic location close to Africa’s northern tip helped it blossom into a centre for New World trade. Catedral de Cádiz, is a display of the city’s wealth and importance, looming spectacularly over the Atlantic’s waves, with cawing seagulls sweeping between its twin bell towers. Inside, treasures from the city’s trading exploits in the West Indies and beyond – which helped fuel the growth of this historically prosperous city – are on display. Enveloped by ocean on almost every side, Cadiz has something of an island feel, and you can cool off from southern Spain’s unrelenting sunshine on the sweeping golden sand beach of Playa Victoria. The two towers of the new El Puente de la Constitución de 1812 mark a contemporary landmark in this most ancient of cities, in the form of a spectacular new road bridge. Torre Tavira, meanwhile, is the most famous of Cadiz’s army of watchtowers, and the highest point in the city. Reach the top for a view of the ocean fringing the city’s expanse, and to learn about the towers – constructed so trading merchants could survey the harbour from their lavish homes. The Central Market is a chaotic place of bartering, where flashing knives dissect fresh fish. Stop in at the orbiting bars to enjoy tapas, freshly prepared with the market’s produce.

Date 05/05/2023
Location Lisbon
In 07:00
Out 19:00

Lisbon, the capital of Portugal, is a city open to the sea and carefully planned with 18th-century elegance. Its founder is said to be the legendary Ulysses, but the theory of an original Phoenician settlement is probably more realistic. Known in Portugal as Lisboa, the city was inhabited by the Romans, Visigoths and, beginning in the 8th century, the Moors. Much of the 16th century was a period of great prosperity and overseas expansion for Portugal. Tragedy struck on All Saints’ Day in 1755 with a devastating earthquake that killed about 40,000 people. The destruction of Lisbon shocked the continent. As a result, the Baixa (lower city) emerged in a single phase of building, carried out in less than a decade by the royal minister, the Marques de Pombal. His carefully planned layout of a perfect neo-classical grid survived to this day and remains the heart of the city. Evidence of pre-quake Lisbon can still be seen in the Belém suburb and the old Moorish section of the Alfama that sprawls below the Castle of St. George.
Lisbon is a compact city on the banks of the Tagus River. Visitors find it easy to get around as many places of interest are in the vicinity of the central downtown area. There is a convenient bus and tram system and taxis are plentiful. Rossio Square, the heart of Lisbon since medieval times, is an ideal place to start exploring. After a fire destroyed parts of the historic neighborhood behind Rossio in 1988, many of the restored buildings emerged with modern interiors behind the original façades.
The city boasts a good many monuments and museums, such as the Jeronimos Monastery, Tower of Belém, the Royal Coach Museum and the Gulbenkian Museum. High above the Baixa is the Bairro Alto (upper city) with its teeming nightlife. The easiest way to connect between the two areas is via the public elevator designed by Gustave Eiffel.
Cruising up the Tagus River to the ship’s berth, you can already spot three of Lisbon’s famous landmarks: the Monument to the Discoveries, the Tower of Belém and the Statue of Christ, which welcomes visitors from its hilltop location high above Europe’s longest suspension bridge.

Date 06/05/2023
Location Porto
In 09:00
Out 18:00

Lively, commercial Oporto is the second largest city in Portugal after Lisbon. Also called Porto for short, the word easily brings to mind the city’s most famous product – port wine.

Oporto’s strategic location on the north bank of the Douro River has accounted for the town’s importance since ancient times. The Romans built a fort here where their trading route crossed the Douro, and the Moors brought their own culture to the area. Oporto profited from provisioning crusaders en route to the Holy Land and enjoyed the riches from Portuguese maritime discoveries during the 15th and 16th centuries.

Date 07/05/2023
Location Vigo
In 08:00
Out 18:00

Located in in Galicia, in the northwest of Spain on the Portuguese border, Vigo is perhaps the country’s most underrated destination. Considered by many as “just’ an industrial fishing port (meaning the seafood rarely travels further than a mile to your plate), Vigo seduces everyone with its cuisine, landscape and warm Spanish welcomes. Like many of Galicia’s coastal towns, life in Vigo has been dictated by the ocean. View less

The city dates back to Roman times and Romanesque architecture such as the churches of Santa María de Castrelos, Santiago de Bembrive, San Salvador de Coruxo can be found all over the city. From the 16th-18th centuries it became alive with commercial trade and buccaneers looking for sunken treasure. The town still enjoys its status as having sunken treasure in its waters, and debates about who would own this if ever discovered periodically colour local conversations. The old town and fishermen’s quarter are worth exploring, although unfortunately with the port’s rapid expansion in the 20th century, many of the original fishermen’s houses were demolished. However, remnants of the city’s Medieval past are still visible and a trip along the Spanish-Portuguese border will reward you with the beautiful walled Medieval city of Tui and the Velansa Fortress. The 13th century fortress offers a splendid view of the fortified Cathedral of Tui on the opposite side of the River Miño. Mount Castro, a castle fortress actually in the city, commands a magnificent view of Vigo and the bay.

Date 08/05/2023
Location La Coruna
In 08:00
Out 14:00

La Coruña, the largest city in Spain’s Galicia region, is among the country’s busiest ports. The remote Galicia area is tucked into the northwest corner of the Iberian Peninsula, surprising visitors with its green and misty countryside that is so much unlike other parts of Spain. The name “Galicia” is Celtic in origin, for it was the Celts who occupied the region around the 6th century BC and erected fortifications.
La Coruña was already considered an important port under the Romans. They were followed by an invasion of Suevians, Visigoths and, much later in 730, the Moors. It was after Galicia was incorporated into the Kingdom of Asturias that the epic saga of the Pilgrimage to Santiago (St. James) began. From the 15th century, overseas trade developed rapidly; in 1720, La Coruña was granted the privilege of trading with America – a right previously only held by Cadiz and Seville. This was the great era when adventurous men voyaged to the colonies and returned with vast riches.

Today, the city’s significant expansion is evident in three distinct quarters: the town center located along the isthmus; the business and commercial center with wide avenues and shopping streets; and the “Ensanche” to the south, occupied by warehouses and factories. Many of the buildings in the old section feature the characteristic glazed façades that have earned La Coruña the name “City of Crystals.” Plaza Maria Pita, the beautiful main square, is named after the local heroine who saved the town in 1589 when she seized the English standard from the beacon and gave the alarm, warning her fellow townsmen of the English attack.

Date 09/05/2023
Location Bilbao
In 08:00
Out 19:00

Whether it’s the flow of its boundary pushing architecture, delights of its finger food tapas, or sweeps of gorgeous shoreline nearby, Bilbao is a city that places a premium on aesthetics. The relentless drive to all things beautiful may be a reaction to the city’s industrial past, but it has led this Basque city to emerge as a new beacon of artistry. American architect Frank Gehry’s masterpiece of flowing metal is the shining standout here, a perfect harmony of smooth titanium and glass, and a thrilling piece in itself.

Inside the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, world-class exhibitions are exhibited in the bright, expansive interior – which practically begs you to explore more. The city has gorgeous historical presence too. Casco Viejo – the medieval area – is its historic core, and home to the original seven streets and cathedral, dating back to the 14thcentury. Tall banks of coloured buildings rise either side as you walk, dwarfed by a tide of pretty facades, overflowing flower boxes, and intricate rail balconies. Plaza Nueva is Bilbao’s neoclassical square, with a procession of arches all around you. Morning flea markets regularly overtake it, offering opportunities to pick through piles of coins, dusty books and rusted antiques on the hunt for bargains, in this most elegant setting. The titanic Mercado de la Ribera market looms tall by the river. Explore to eat your way through an endless pile of Basque pintxos – the local take on tapas. Cocktail sticks will quickly stack up as you gorge on plump olives, organic cheeses, and feather thin slices of curled hams, while orbiting Europe’s largest covered market. Described as a perfect blend of beauty and function by UNESCO, the Vizcaya Bridge is an unusual but spectacular piece of industrial architecture. The world’s oldest, gigantic transporter crane is still in use today, swinging cars and passengers from one side of the gaping Nervion River’s mouth to the other.

Date 10/05/2023
Location Bordeaux
In 11:50
Out

The name alone conjures images of sun-ripened grapes, splashes of refined flavour, and the joy of clinking glasses. Bordeaux is synonymous with quality and prestige, and the promise of endless opportunities to sample the city’s famous, full-bodied red wines makes a visit to this elegant French port city one to truly savour. Sprinkled with scenic, turret-adorned mansion castles, which stand above soil softened by the Atlantic and winding flow of the Garonne River, the vineyards of Bordeaux consistently produce revered wines, enjoyed right across the globe.

Explore France’s largest wine region, walking through vineyards where dusty clumps of grapes hang, before descending into cellars to see the painstaking processes that make this region a global wine centre. The acclaimed, sensory experience of Cité du Vin wine museum lets you put your own nose to the test, learning more about the craft involved in producing world class vintages. Brush up on your wine knowledge, with our blog [insert You’ll Fall in Love with Wine in Bordeaux]. Bordeaux itself is an intoxicating blend of old and new – a fact perfectly illustrated by the Water Mirror. This living art installation has reinvigorated one of the city’s most important historical sites, and it feels as though you’re walking on water, as you step through the cooling mist of Place De La Bourse. The moisture generates a glorious mirrored composition of the 300-year-old elegant palatial architecture in front of you. Water also flows freely from the magnificent Monument aux Girondins statue, where horses rear up to extol the values of the Girondin revolutionaries. Marche des Quais – the city’s lively fish market – is the spot to try this wine capital’s freshest lemon-drizzled oysters and juicy prawns.

Date 11/05/2023
Location Bordeaux
In
Out

The name alone conjures images of sun-ripened grapes, splashes of refined flavour, and the joy of clinking glasses. Bordeaux is synonymous with quality and prestige, and the promise of endless opportunities to sample the city’s famous, full-bodied red wines makes a visit to this elegant French port city one to truly savour. Sprinkled with scenic, turret-adorned mansion castles, which stand above soil softened by the Atlantic and winding flow of the Garonne River, the vineyards of Bordeaux consistently produce revered wines, enjoyed right across the globe.

Explore France’s largest wine region, walking through vineyards where dusty clumps of grapes hang, before descending into cellars to see the painstaking processes that make this region a global wine centre. The acclaimed, sensory experience of Cité du Vin wine museum lets you put your own nose to the test, learning more about the craft involved in producing world class vintages. Brush up on your wine knowledge, with our blog [insert You’ll Fall in Love with Wine in Bordeaux]. Bordeaux itself is an intoxicating blend of old and new – a fact perfectly illustrated by the Water Mirror. This living art installation has reinvigorated one of the city’s most important historical sites, and it feels as though you’re walking on water, as you step through the cooling mist of Place De La Bourse. The moisture generates a glorious mirrored composition of the 300-year-old elegant palatial architecture in front of you. Water also flows freely from the magnificent Monument aux Girondins statue, where horses rear up to extol the values of the Girondin revolutionaries. Marche des Quais – the city’s lively fish market – is the spot to try this wine capital’s freshest lemon-drizzled oysters and juicy prawns.

Date 12/05/2023
Location Bordeaux
In
Out 23:59

The name alone conjures images of sun-ripened grapes, splashes of refined flavour, and the joy of clinking glasses. Bordeaux is synonymous with quality and prestige, and the promise of endless opportunities to sample the city’s famous, full-bodied red wines makes a visit to this elegant French port city one to truly savour. Sprinkled with scenic, turret-adorned mansion castles, which stand above soil softened by the Atlantic and winding flow of the Garonne River, the vineyards of Bordeaux consistently produce revered wines, enjoyed right across the globe.

Explore France’s largest wine region, walking through vineyards where dusty clumps of grapes hang, before descending into cellars to see the painstaking processes that make this region a global wine centre. The acclaimed, sensory experience of Cité du Vin wine museum lets you put your own nose to the test, learning more about the craft involved in producing world class vintages. Brush up on your wine knowledge, with our blog [insert You’ll Fall in Love with Wine in Bordeaux]. Bordeaux itself is an intoxicating blend of old and new – a fact perfectly illustrated by the Water Mirror. This living art installation has reinvigorated one of the city’s most important historical sites, and it feels as though you’re walking on water, as you step through the cooling mist of Place De La Bourse. The moisture generates a glorious mirrored composition of the 300-year-old elegant palatial architecture in front of you. Water also flows freely from the magnificent Monument aux Girondins statue, where horses rear up to extol the values of the Girondin revolutionaries. Marche des Quais – the city’s lively fish market – is the spot to try this wine capital’s freshest lemon-drizzled oysters and juicy prawns.

Date 13/05/2023
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 14/05/2023
Location Saint Malo (Brittany)
In 08:00
Out 23:15

Ship sails flutter in the breeze, at the natural port of Saint-Malo – a historic and resilient walled city, which watches out over golden sands and island fortresses. Strung tenuously to the mainland, Saint Malo was the historic home of a rowdy mix of skilled sailors and new world explorers – as well as the plunderers who earned the place its ‘Pirate City’ title. Some of history’s great voyages have launched from here – including Jacques Cartier’s, which led to the settlement of New France and modern-day Quebec. View less

Founded by a Welsh monk, who made his way here in the 6th century, Saint Malo’s castle is forged from sheer granite, and its steep defensive ramparts arise defiantly. The atmospheric walled town turns its back to the mainland and gazes out longingly into the sea. Explore streets that breathe with maritime tales and medieval charm – restored from the intense damage sustained during the Second World War. Cathédrale de St Malo rises above the tight paths, offering views of the peppered islands and fortifications. Boatloads of fresh oysters and scallops are heaved ashore – savour them or grab savoury crepes galettes, stuffed with cheese and ham. Wash Saint Malo’s foods down with a Brittany cider, which challenges wine as the indulgence of choice in these parts. A highly tidal region, the pocket-sized islands of Petit Bé and Grand Bé join the mainland, and you can explore at leisure as the tide recedes. The incredible island of Mont Saint Michel also looms in the estuary of the Couesnon River nearby, hovering like a cinematic mirage above high tide’s waters. Elsewhere, Cap Fréhel’s lush green peninsula juts out from the emerald coast towards Jersey, tempting with rich coastal hiking trails.

Date 15/05/2023
Location St Peter Port
In 08:00
Out 18:00

Twenty-five square mile (40 sq km) Guernsey is the second largest of the Channel Islands, which lie in the English Channel west of the Cherbourg peninsula. Along with its sister island of Jersey, Guernsey has been a part of Britain since 1066, though retaining a culture entirely of its own.

Date 16/05/2023
Location Honfleur
In 08:15
Out 21:00

The crammed together, timber-framed houses of Honfleur’s delightful waterfront simply beg to be painted, and the waterfront beauty has been immortalised on the canvases of artists like Monet, and Honfleur’s celebrated son, Boudin. Located in scenic Normandy, where the Seine opens out into the Channel, this is one of France’s – and the world’s – most spectacular, historic harbours. Impossibly picturesque, the Vieux Bassin’s Norman harbour townhouses are an artist’s dream, reflecting out onto the still water, between bright wooden fishing boats. View less

It may be gorgeous, but it’s also a historically important port, and Samuel de Champlain’s epic voyage – which resulted in the founding of Quebec – launched from these waters. Take a stroll back in time, as you wander cobbled streets where flowers spill down walls or sit to indulge in Calvados – brandy made from Normandy’s famous apples. A museum dedicated to Eugene Boudin, the town’s influential impressionist artist, displays visions of the harbour and region, as well as paintings of the town’s stunning wooden church. Wander to Eglise St Catherine itself, to see the twisting structure, which is France’s largest wooden chapel. Constructed from trees taken from nearby Touques Forest, it replaced the stone church that stood here previously, which was destroyed during the Hundred Years War. Out of Honfleur, The spectacular Pont de Normandie cable-stayed bridge loops up over the Seine’s estuary, bringing excursions to Le Havre even closer. The pensive, sombre beaches of the D-Day landings stretch out across Normandy’s coastline, while the Bayeux Tapestry unfurls within reach of Honfleur’s picturesque scenery.

Date 17/05/2023
Location Southampton
In 07:00
Out

Standing on a triangular peninsula formed at the place where the rivers Itchen and Test flow into an eight-mile inlet from the Solent, Southampton has figured in numerous stirring events and for centuries has been of strategic maritime importance. It was from here that the Pilgrim Fathers departed for America in the tiny Mayflower in 1620 and many great ocean liners, such as the Queen Mary and the Titanic have followed since. The image of the thousand-year-old city was greatly blemished by the bombing during World War II and postwar planning caused changes almost beyond recognition.

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