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Home Cruises Grand Northern Europe Silver Moon 2022-05-06

Grand Northern Europe - MO220506053 Silver Moon departing 6 May 2022

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Silver Moon
Ship
Cruise Line
Embark
6 May 2022
Duration
53 Nights
From / To
Lisbon / Stockholm, Sweden
Ports of call
Lisbon - Oporto (Leixoes), Portugal - La Coruna, Spain - Bilbao, Spain - St Jean De Luzz
Rating

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Itinerary

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Date Date
Location Location
 
In In
Out Out
Date 06/05/2022
Location Lisbon
In
Out 19:00

Lisbon, the capital of Portugal, is a city open to the sea and carefully planned with 18th-century elegance. Its founder is said to be the legendary Ulysses, but the theory of an original Phoenician settlement is probably more realistic. Known in Portugal as Lisboa, the city was inhabited by the Romans, Visigoths and, beginning in the 8th century, the Moors. Much of the 16th century was a period of great prosperity and overseas expansion for Portugal. Tragedy struck on All Saints’ Day in 1755 with a devastating earthquake that killed about 40,000 people. The destruction of Lisbon shocked the continent. As a result, the Baixa (lower city) emerged in a single phase of building, carried out in less than a decade by the royal minister, the Marques de Pombal. His carefully planned layout of a perfect neo-classical grid survived to this day and remains the heart of the city. Evidence of pre-quake Lisbon can still be seen in the Belém suburb and the old Moorish section of the Alfama that sprawls below the Castle of St. George.
Lisbon is a compact city on the banks of the Tagus River. Visitors find it easy to get around as many places of interest are in the vicinity of the central downtown area. There is a convenient bus and tram system and taxis are plentiful. Rossio Square, the heart of Lisbon since medieval times, is an ideal place to start exploring. After a fire destroyed parts of the historic neighborhood behind Rossio in 1988, many of the restored buildings emerged with modern interiors behind the original façades.
The city boasts a good many monuments and museums, such as the Jeronimos Monastery, Tower of Belém, the Royal Coach Museum and the Gulbenkian Museum. High above the Baixa is the Bairro Alto (upper city) with its teeming nightlife. The easiest way to connect between the two areas is via the public elevator designed by Gustave Eiffel.
Cruising up the Tagus River to the ship’s berth, you can already spot three of Lisbon’s famous landmarks: the Monument to the Discoveries, the Tower of Belém and the Statue of Christ, which welcomes visitors from its hilltop location high above Europe’s longest suspension bridge.

Date 07/05/2022
Location Oporto (Leixoes), Portugal
In 09:00
Out 17:00

Lively, commercial Oporto is the second largest city in Portugal after Lisbon. Also called Porto for short, the word easily brings to mind the city’s most famous product – port wine.

Oporto’s strategic location on the north bank of the Douro River has accounted for the town’s importance since ancient times. The Romans built a fort here where their trading route crossed the Douro, and the Moors brought their own culture to the area. Oporto profited from provisioning crusaders en route to the Holy Land and enjoyed the riches from Portuguese maritime discoveries during the 15th and 16th centuries.

Date 08/05/2022
Location La Coruna, Spain
In 08:00
Out 14:00

La Coruña, the largest city in Spain’s Galicia region, is among the country’s busiest ports. The remote Galicia area is tucked into the northwest corner of the Iberian Peninsula, surprising visitors with its green and misty countryside that is so much unlike other parts of Spain. The name “Galicia” is Celtic in origin, for it was the Celts who occupied the region around the 6th century BC and erected fortifications.
La Coruña was already considered an important port under the Romans. They were followed by an invasion of Suevians, Visigoths and, much later in 730, the Moors. It was after Galicia was incorporated into the Kingdom of Asturias that the epic saga of the Pilgrimage to Santiago (St. James) began. From the 15th century, overseas trade developed rapidly; in 1720, La Coruña was granted the privilege of trading with America – a right previously only held by Cadiz and Seville. This was the great era when adventurous men voyaged to the colonies and returned with vast riches.

Today, the city’s significant expansion is evident in three distinct quarters: the town center located along the isthmus; the business and commercial center with wide avenues and shopping streets; and the “Ensanche” to the south, occupied by warehouses and factories. Many of the buildings in the old section feature the characteristic glazed façades that have earned La Coruña the name “City of Crystals.” Plaza Maria Pita, the beautiful main square, is named after the local heroine who saved the town in 1589 when she seized the English standard from the beacon and gave the alarm, warning her fellow townsmen of the English attack.

Date 09/05/2022
Location Bilbao, Spain
In 08:00
Out 23:00

Whether it’s the flow of its boundary pushing architecture, delights of its finger food tapas, or sweeps of gorgeous shoreline nearby, Bilbao is a city that places a premium on aesthetics. The relentless drive to all things beautiful may be a reaction to the city’s industrial past, but it has led this Basque city to emerge as a new beacon of artistry. American architect Frank Gehry’s masterpiece of flowing metal is the shining standout here, a perfect harmony of smooth titanium and glass, and a thrilling piece in itself.

Inside the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, world-class exhibitions are exhibited in the bright, expansive interior – which practically begs you to explore more. The city has gorgeous historical presence too. Casco Viejo – the medieval area – is its historic core, and home to the original seven streets and cathedral, dating back to the 14thcentury. Tall banks of coloured buildings rise either side as you walk, dwarfed by a tide of pretty facades, overflowing flower boxes, and intricate rail balconies. Plaza Nueva is Bilbao’s neoclassical square, with a procession of arches all around you. Morning flea markets regularly overtake it, offering opportunities to pick through piles of coins, dusty books and rusted antiques on the hunt for bargains, in this most elegant setting. The titanic Mercado de la Ribera market looms tall by the river. Explore to eat your way through an endless pile of Basque pintxos – the local take on tapas. Cocktail sticks will quickly stack up as you gorge on plump olives, organic cheeses, and feather thin slices of curled hams, while orbiting Europe’s largest covered market. Described as a perfect blend of beauty and function by UNESCO, the Vizcaya Bridge is an unusual but spectacular piece of industrial architecture. The world’s oldest, gigantic transporter crane is still in use today, swinging cars and passengers from one side of the gaping Nervion River’s mouth to the other.

Date 10/05/2022
Location St Jean De Luzz
In
Out
Date 11/05/2022
Location Bordeaux, France
In
Out

The name alone conjures images of sun-ripened grapes, splashes of refined flavour, and the joy of clinking glasses. Bordeaux is synonymous with quality and prestige, and the promise of endless opportunities to sample the city’s famous, full-bodied red wines makes a visit to this elegant French port city one to truly savour. Sprinkled with scenic, turret-adorned mansion castles, which stand above soil softened by the Atlantic and winding flow of the Garonne River, the vineyards of Bordeaux consistently produce revered wines, enjoyed right across the globe.

Explore France’s largest wine region, walking through vineyards where dusty clumps of grapes hang, before descending into cellars to see the painstaking processes that make this region a global wine centre. The acclaimed, sensory experience of Cité du Vin wine museum lets you put your own nose to the test, learning more about the craft involved in producing world class vintages. Brush up on your wine knowledge, with our blog [insert You’ll Fall in Love with Wine in Bordeaux]. Bordeaux itself is an intoxicating blend of old and new – a fact perfectly illustrated by the Water Mirror. This living art installation has reinvigorated one of the city’s most important historical sites, and it feels as though you’re walking on water, as you step through the cooling mist of Place De La Bourse. The moisture generates a glorious mirrored composition of the 300-year-old elegant palatial architecture in front of you. Water also flows freely from the magnificent Monument aux Girondins statue, where horses rear up to extol the values of the Girondin revolutionaries. Marche des Quais – the city’s lively fish market – is the spot to try this wine capital’s freshest lemon-drizzled oysters and juicy prawns.

Date 12/05/2022
Location Bordeaux, France
In
Out 17:00

The name alone conjures images of sun-ripened grapes, splashes of refined flavour, and the joy of clinking glasses. Bordeaux is synonymous with quality and prestige, and the promise of endless opportunities to sample the city’s famous, full-bodied red wines makes a visit to this elegant French port city one to truly savour. Sprinkled with scenic, turret-adorned mansion castles, which stand above soil softened by the Atlantic and winding flow of the Garonne River, the vineyards of Bordeaux consistently produce revered wines, enjoyed right across the globe.

Explore France’s largest wine region, walking through vineyards where dusty clumps of grapes hang, before descending into cellars to see the painstaking processes that make this region a global wine centre. The acclaimed, sensory experience of Cité du Vin wine museum lets you put your own nose to the test, learning more about the craft involved in producing world class vintages. Brush up on your wine knowledge, with our blog [insert You’ll Fall in Love with Wine in Bordeaux]. Bordeaux itself is an intoxicating blend of old and new – a fact perfectly illustrated by the Water Mirror. This living art installation has reinvigorated one of the city’s most important historical sites, and it feels as though you’re walking on water, as you step through the cooling mist of Place De La Bourse. The moisture generates a glorious mirrored composition of the 300-year-old elegant palatial architecture in front of you. Water also flows freely from the magnificent Monument aux Girondins statue, where horses rear up to extol the values of the Girondin revolutionaries. Marche des Quais – the city’s lively fish market – is the spot to try this wine capital’s freshest lemon-drizzled oysters and juicy prawns.

Date 13/05/2022
Location At Sea
In
Out

Calling all skywatchers, umbraphiles and astronomers! Extremely rare and very exciting, a full solar eclipse is a bucket list experience if ever there was one. Scheduled for 4th December, 2021 the next eclipse will take place only in Antarctica and we will be positioned in the small path of totality for maximum effect. This experience is not available for the average cruisers; imagine being surrounded by brilliant light one minute, then complete blackout the next, before enjoying the mysterious shadow-play as we wind back to the blinding white of Antarctica.

Watch how the curious wildlife will react to the eclipse, making sure to note their behaviour and let the onboard naturalist know. Other onboard expedition staff will share their insightful knowledge in order to help you gain a better understanding of this phenomenal phenomenon. As if a trip to the seventh continent was not special enough!

Date 14/05/2022
Location Saint Malo (Brittany)
In 06:30
Out 20:00

Ship sails flutter in the breeze, at the natural port of Saint-Malo – a historic and resilient walled city, which watches out over golden sands and island fortresses. Strung tenuously to the mainland, Saint Malo was the historic home of a rowdy mix of skilled sailors and new world explorers – as well as the plunderers who earned the place its ‘Pirate City’ title. Some of history’s great voyages have launched from here – including Jacques Cartier’s, which led to the settlement of New France and modern-day Quebec. View less

Founded by a Welsh monk, who made his way here in the 6th century, Saint Malo’s castle is forged from sheer granite, and its steep defensive ramparts arise defiantly. The atmospheric walled town turns its back to the mainland and gazes out longingly into the sea. Explore streets that breathe with maritime tales and medieval charm – restored from the intense damage sustained during the Second World War. Cathédrale de St Malo rises above the tight paths, offering views of the peppered islands and fortifications. Boatloads of fresh oysters and scallops are heaved ashore – savour them or grab savoury crepes galettes, stuffed with cheese and ham. Wash Saint Malo’s foods down with a Brittany cider, which challenges wine as the indulgence of choice in these parts. A highly tidal region, the pocket-sized islands of Petit Bé and Grand Bé join the mainland, and you can explore at leisure as the tide recedes. The incredible island of Mont Saint Michel also looms in the estuary of the Couesnon River nearby, hovering like a cinematic mirage above high tide’s waters. Elsewhere, Cap Fréhel’s lush green peninsula juts out from the emerald coast towards Jersey, tempting with rich coastal hiking trails.

Date 15/05/2022
Location Rouen, France
In
Out

Situated in a natural amphitheater on the Seine River, Rouen’s status as a commercial and cultural center reaches as far back as the Middle Ages. As a result of its importance, the city was the target of many sieges. During the English occupation in the Hundred Years’ War, Rouen was the site where Joan of Arc was burned at the stake in 1431. Other tragedies include the destruction of a major part of the commercial and industrial center during bombing raids in World War II.
Today the city presents an interesting mix of medieval and modern architecture. Rouen expanded outward during the 20th century with the development of industries; its increasingly busy port is now the fourth largest in France. The city’s greatest attraction is its historic center. Known as the “City of a Hundred Spires,” many of its important edifices are churches. Dominating the large central square is the magnificent Notre-Dame Cathedral, a masterpiece of French Gothic architecture. You may recognize the west façade of the cathedral from a series of studies by Claude Monet, which are now displayed in the Musée d’Orsay in Paris.

Surrounding the square are picturesque half-timbered houses with steeply pointed roofs. The wealth of architectural treasures and the ambiance of Rouen’s historic center never fail to impress visitors.

Rouen also serves as a gateway to Paris. Driving distance is 2 hours by car or 1.5 hours by train. (Trains arrive in Paris at St. Lazare Station.)

Date 16/05/2022
Location Rouen, France
In
Out 18:00

Situated in a natural amphitheater on the Seine River, Rouen’s status as a commercial and cultural center reaches as far back as the Middle Ages. As a result of its importance, the city was the target of many sieges. During the English occupation in the Hundred Years’ War, Rouen was the site where Joan of Arc was burned at the stake in 1431. Other tragedies include the destruction of a major part of the commercial and industrial center during bombing raids in World War II.
Today the city presents an interesting mix of medieval and modern architecture. Rouen expanded outward during the 20th century with the development of industries; its increasingly busy port is now the fourth largest in France. The city’s greatest attraction is its historic center. Known as the “City of a Hundred Spires,” many of its important edifices are churches. Dominating the large central square is the magnificent Notre-Dame Cathedral, a masterpiece of French Gothic architecture. You may recognize the west façade of the cathedral from a series of studies by Claude Monet, which are now displayed in the Musée d’Orsay in Paris.

Surrounding the square are picturesque half-timbered houses with steeply pointed roofs. The wealth of architectural treasures and the ambiance of Rouen’s historic center never fail to impress visitors.

Rouen also serves as a gateway to Paris. Driving distance is 2 hours by car or 1.5 hours by train. (Trains arrive in Paris at St. Lazare Station.)

Date 17/05/2022
Location Honfleur, France
In 13:00
Out 22:00

The crammed together, timber-framed houses of Honfleur’s delightful waterfront simply beg to be painted, and the waterfront beauty has been immortalised on the canvases of artists like Monet, and Honfleur’s celebrated son, Boudin. Located in scenic Normandy, where the Seine opens out into the Channel, this is one of France’s – and the world’s – most spectacular, historic harbours. Impossibly picturesque, the Vieux Bassin’s Norman harbour townhouses are an artist’s dream, reflecting out onto the still water, between bright wooden fishing boats. View less

It may be gorgeous, but it’s also a historically important port, and Samuel de Champlain’s epic voyage – which resulted in the founding of Quebec – launched from these waters. Take a stroll back in time, as you wander cobbled streets where flowers spill down walls or sit to indulge in Calvados – brandy made from Normandy’s famous apples. A museum dedicated to Eugene Boudin, the town’s influential impressionist artist, displays visions of the harbour and region, as well as paintings of the town’s stunning wooden church. Wander to Eglise St Catherine itself, to see the twisting structure, which is France’s largest wooden chapel. Constructed from trees taken from nearby Touques Forest, it replaced the stone church that stood here previously, which was destroyed during the Hundred Years War. Out of Honfleur, The spectacular Pont de Normandie cable-stayed bridge loops up over the Seine’s estuary, bringing excursions to Le Havre even closer. The pensive, sombre beaches of the D-Day landings stretch out across Normandy’s coastline, while the Bayeux Tapestry unfurls within reach of Honfleur’s picturesque scenery.

Date 18/05/2022
Location Southampton
In 07:00
Out

Standing on a triangular peninsula formed at the place where the rivers Itchen and Test flow into an eight-mile inlet from the Solent, Southampton has figured in numerous stirring events and for centuries has been of strategic maritime importance. It was from here that the Pilgrim Fathers departed for America in the tiny Mayflower in 1620 and many great ocean liners, such as the Queen Mary and the Titanic have followed since. The image of the thousand-year-old city was greatly blemished by the bombing during World War II and postwar planning caused changes almost beyond recognition.

Date 19/05/2022
Location Falmouth (English Harbour)
In 09:00
Out 18:00

With 365 beaches to choose from, it’s said that Antigua has a sandy escape for every day of the year. The sheltered twin bays of English Harbour hold an ever-alluring appeal and draw a beauty-seeking flotilla of yachts to drop anchor in their calm waters. Strap on scuba gear, crunch through paths of dense jungle, or soar up above to volcanic peaks in a helicopter – the choice is yours.

Whether you seek adventure, or simply want to take it easy with a paperback and the song of the waves – a beautiful island of sun, sea, and sand lies before you. As the name implies, there’s an unrestrained British Colonial influence here, and Horatio Nelson’s name is imprinted deep into Falmouth’s story. Walk in his footsteps at Nelson’s Dockyards – the gorgeously restored, working Georgian dockyard. The colonial spirit is an evocative throwback to this important 17th-century Royal Navy base. Museums tell the story of the British exploits in the West Indies, and the life of Nelson – who lived here for three years. Clarence House is also close by, and the 200-year-old residence continues to draw visits from British royals to this day. This being Antigua, there’s no shortage of jaw-dropping beaches and bathing opportunities. Take to pearly-white sands or explore the Pillars of Hercules – a set of smooth, rounded columns of rock that plunge dramatically into the waters below. Pigeon Point Beach is a ravishing amalgam of blues and pristine white sands, where turtles and stingrays glide through patches of coral reefs. Enjoy the best views of the naturally coddled bays of English Harbour by rising to Shirley Heights. Sunset is thrilling from this elevated vantage point, as reds and pinks spill across the skies.

Date 20/05/2022
Location Fishguard
In 08:00
Out 19:00

Perched on a clifftop and stunningly picturesque, Fishguard is considered the very heart of North Pembrokeshire. A small market town that almost seems untouched by time, you’ll find clusters of quayside cottages, family businesses selling local produce and plenty of Gaelic charm! Market day falls on a Saturday and although principally food, there are some stalls selling local arts and crafts too.

If you are not lucky enough to be visiting on market day, the pretty high street has some lovely shops where you can easily while away a couple of hours. Known internationally as the place of the last invasion of Britain when the French landed in 1797, the village heaves with history. Historians will of course already know that the two-day invasion soon failed and the peace treaty was signed in the Royal Oak pub in the market square. Over 200 years later the pub still stands and is perhaps one of the best places to soak up the local charm! The real stars of the show here however are the lovely surroundings. The calm waters are perfect for kayaking while walkers will love the national parks that are filled with signposted trails for all levels of ability. Cyclist of all levels will also be pleased; Fishguard and its surroundings do have a few hills, but also lots of straight roads that offer a gentle visit of the stunning landscape. If staying on the water is more your style, then boat trips to see the rest of the lovely coastline can be easily organised in port. If all the activity gets too much for you then why not enjoy a delicious local welsh cake in one of the pretty cafes or head to the town hall and have a look at the 100 foot long Last Invasion Tapestry, a humorous and entertaining story in a Bayeux tapestry style of the 1797 invasion of mainland Britain.

Date 21/05/2022
Location Liverpool
In 09:00
Out 22:00

Who can say Liverpool without thinking of The Beatles? Home to the fab four, Penny Lane, Strawberry Fields and the Cavern Club, this northern English city is undoubtedly one of the most important places on the 20th-century music scene. Even UNESCO agrees – Liverpool became a City of Music (one of only 19 in the world) in 2015. So understandably, it’s bursting with pride. View less

Not only for its most famous former residents but also its football team, its maritime heritage and its thriving cultural scene (it was Capital of Culture in 2008). A huge regeneration project over the past two decades has seen Liverpool blossom from being a below-par northern English city to a somewhere buzzing with charm. The arrival of the Tate Liverpool paved the way – quickly followed by the restoration of some 2,500 plus listed buildings (that’s more than any English city outside London). The waterfront revitalisation came next with bars, clubs, galleries and independent boutiques, giving Liverpool some of the best dining and shopping there is. Don’t leave here without tasting Scouse – a traditional beef stew – and from where Liverpudlians draw their nickname “Scousers”. Culturally speaking, Liverpool is “bang on” as Scousers would say. The three Graces (named after the Greek goddesses of charm, beauty and creativity) line the waterfront and are responsible in part for Liverpool’s second UNESCO gong as a World Heritage Site. Further afield, the lovely parks and Crosby Beach offer a welcome respite from the urban hub.

Date 22/05/2022
Location Dublin, Ireland
In 08:00
Out 23:00

Atmospheric cobbled streets, with buskers scraping fiddles and characterful pubs inviting passersby inside, is Dublin in a snapshot. A city of irrepressible energy and lust for life, Ireland’s capital is as welcoming a place as you’ll find. Horse-drawn carriages plod along cobbled centuries-old streets, blending with an easy-going, cosmopolitan outlook. Known for its fun-filled gathering of pubs, any excuse works to enjoy a celebratory toast and chat among good company.

Home to perhaps the world’s most famous beer – slurp perfect pourings of thick, dark Guinness – cranked out for the city’s thirsty punters. Learn more of the humble pint’s journey at the Guinness Storehouse. Dublin has come along way since the Vikings established a trading port here, back in the 9th Century. In the time since, the city became the British Empire’s defacto second city, and the Georgian imprint still adds oodles of historic character. Learn of 1916’s Easter Uprising, when the Irish rebelled and established their independence here, as you visit the infamous, haunting Kilmainham Gaol. The uprising’s leaders were tried and executed in these dark confines. Dublin’s St. Patrick’s Cathedral has immense history below its steep spire, which dates back to 1191. There’s rich literary heritage to leaf through too, and the city’s streets were rendered vividly in James Joyce’s classic Ullyses. The Museum of Literature celebrates the full scope of Dublin’s lyrical talents. Trinity College also has a prestigious roll-call of alumni – visit to see the Book of Kells, a beautifully illustrated bible of the medieval era.

Date 23/05/2022
Location Belfast
In 08:00
Out 18:00

Reborn as a cool, modern city, Belfast has successfully left its troubles behind, emerging as a hotbed of culture and architecture, where the comfort of a cosy pub is never far away. Take a voyage of discovery in its maritime quarter, home to a celebrated museum dedicated to the most famous ship ever built, which was constructed right here in the city’s shipyards. A walk across the Lagan Weir Footbridge brings you to Belfast’s fascinating Titanic District – an area of the city devoted to its rich ship-building heritage.

The state-of-the-art Titanic Museum brings the story of the doomed vessel to life, and is the largest museum dedicated to the infamously ‘unsinkable’ ship. Wind up a nautical-themed ramble along the Maritime Mile with a visit to SS Nomadic, the smaller cousin of the Titanic, and a ship which serves as a fascinating time capsule back to the pomp and grandeur of the Titanic, while also telling its own stories of service in both World Wars. There’s just enough time to give the 10-metre long Salmon of Knowledge sculpture a quick peck for luck, before continuing to explore. A stark barbed wire and graffitied sheet metal barrier marks an abrupt scar through the city’s residential areas. The Peace Line was constructed during the height of the Troubles, when Belfast was plagued by sectarian divisions between Protestants and Catholics. Nowadays, you can jump in a black taxi tour to see the colourful murals and living history of the walls, which stand as a stark reminder of the fragility of peace. After exploring the city’s historic divisions, a reminder of Belfast’s uniting creativity can be found at the Metropolitan Arts Centre – a seven-storey tall building, which invites light to gloriously cascade inside. The Cathedral Quarter is a cobbled blend of flower-adorned pubs, restaurants and theatres, and venues where music spills out onto the streets at night, and many a pint is cheerily shared.

Date 24/05/2022
Location Oban, UK
In 08:00
Out 19:00

Oban is a centre for Gaelic history and culture. As you approach the town you will see McCaig’s Tower, a replica of the Colosseum of Rome, built in 1900 by a local banker. Argyll, home of the Clan Campbell, was once the ancient Scottish Kingdom of Dalriada. In mist-shrouded Kilmartin Glen, one of the most beautiful in Scotland, see the ruins of Dunadd Castle, where a weathered rock inscribed with a boar head marks where Scottish kings were crowned until the 11th century. Nearby, stone circles attest to a civilization dating back 5,000 years. Then travel to Loch Fyne, where the present head of the Campbells, the Duke of Argyll, makes his home at Inverary Castle. The 19th century castle was admired by Sir Walter Scott as a fine example of the Scottish baronial style.

Date 25/05/2022
Location Stornoway (Isle Of Lewis)
In 08:00
Out 18:00

The Hebrides, or Western Isles, are a group of more than 500 islands off Scotland’s west coast in the Atlantic Ocean of which about one hundred are inhabited. They are divided into the Inner and Outer Hebrides. The Inner Hebrides are comprised of Skye, Mull, Islay, and Jura. The Outer Hebrides include Lewis and Harris, North and South Uist, Benbecula, Barra, Saint Kilda, and the Flannan Islands. The archipelago covers an area of 4,500 square miles (7,200 sq km). Most of its islands are covered by sparse vegetation and boast a fairly mild climate. Tourism, sheep and cattle raising, and the manufacture of textiles are the principal sources of income. The most famous export item is no doubt the excellent Harris tweed.

Date 26/05/2022
Location At Sea
In
Out

Calling all skywatchers, umbraphiles and astronomers! Extremely rare and very exciting, a full solar eclipse is a bucket list experience if ever there was one. Scheduled for 4th December, 2021 the next eclipse will take place only in Antarctica and we will be positioned in the small path of totality for maximum effect. This experience is not available for the average cruisers; imagine being surrounded by brilliant light one minute, then complete blackout the next, before enjoying the mysterious shadow-play as we wind back to the blinding white of Antarctica.

Watch how the curious wildlife will react to the eclipse, making sure to note their behaviour and let the onboard naturalist know. Other onboard expedition staff will share their insightful knowledge in order to help you gain a better understanding of this phenomenal phenomenon. As if a trip to the seventh continent was not special enough!

Date 27/05/2022
Location Seydisfjordur, Iceland
In
Out

Seydisfjordur,, a beautiful 19th-century Norwegian village on the east coast of Iceland, is regarded by many as one of Iceland’s most picturesque towns, not only due to its impressive environment, but also because nowhere in Iceland has a community of old wooden buildings been preserved so well as here. Poet Matthías Johannessen called Seydisfjordur a ‘pearl enclosed in a shell’.

Date 28/05/2022
Location Djupivogur
In 08:00
Out 19:00

Slow the pace, and discover the refreshing approach to life that Djupivogur has made its trademark. You can leave your phone behind as you step out into this Icelandic town, which has won awards celebrating its leisurely outlook and stubborn rebellion against the frenetic pace of modern life. After all, who needs emails and notifications when you have some of the most humbling monochrome scenery and gashed fjords, waiting on your doorstep? Sitting on a peninsula to the south-east of Iceland, the glacial approach to life here wins many hearts.

A place where hammers knock on metal in workshops, artists ladle paint onto canvases, and wild ponies roam across mountains, Djupivogur is an uninhibited artistic hub – full of makers and creatives. The most expansive project is the 34 egg sculptures that dot the coastline, created by the Icelandic artist, Sigurður Guðmundsson. Each egg represents a different native bird species. Fishing remains the primary industry, and you can savour the soft fruits of the labour in restaurants serving up smoked trout and fish soup within their cosy confines. Wander the surrounding landscapes, where snow-freckled mountains rise, and lazy seals lie on dark rock beaches, to feel Djupivogur’s natural inspiration seeping under your skin. Alive with greens and golds in summer, further ventures reveal bright blue glaciers and the sprawling waterfalls of Vatnajökull National Park. The cliff-hugging puffins of Papey Island are a short boat ride away, while Bulandstindur Mountain’s pyramid shape is a stand out even among these fairy-tale landscapes.

Date 29/05/2022
Location Heimaey, Iceland
In 09:00
Out 18:00

Rising like craggy icebergs from the waves, Heimaey and the Westman Islands are a perfect example of nature’s extraordinary power to both create and destroy. Haunted by the same volcanic forces that once forged the islands, it was only the brave actions of the island’s villagers – who stopped the flow of lava from the Eldfell volcano with a wall of seawater – that saved this charming whitewash wooden town from destruction. View less

The volcano that exploded in 1973 made headline news around the globe and saw the islanders evacuated during an elaborate rescue mission. Learn more of the most fateful day in the islands’ history at the museum, and see houses – charred black by lava – which have been salvaged and exhibited, frozen in time. The volcanic forces created a beautiful mosaic of craggy islands, just off-shore from the mainland. Alive with animal life – pods of orca whales roll through the Atlantic’s choppy waves, seabirds call in the skies overhead, and baby puffins take tentative first steps on the cliffs hugging these islands. You’ll notice that the islanders have a particular bond with the 8 million Atlantic puffins who live here. Statues of the birds stand on the streets, and extraordinary rescue missions sometimes take place at night – when locals comb the streets to help return lost pufflings to their cliffside homes. Be sure to walk out along the coast to Stórhöfdi, to view the extraordinary colony of these remarkable, adorable birds that live here. For some more tips on spotting the puffins, take a look at our blog.

Date 30/05/2022
Location Reykjavik, Iceland
In 07:00
Out

The fire, frost and water symbolized by the red, white and blue of Iceland’s flag are manifested by the ice and snow of its glaciers, the hot mud pools, geysers and glowing lava flows in the country’s volcanic regions.
The island’s settlement dates back to 874 when a Norwegian named Ingolf Arnarson arrived at present-day Reykjavik. In 930, the settlers formed a legislature, the Alting, which was the beginning of the Commonwealth of Iceland. From the 10th to the 14th centuries, Iceland developed a literary form, the Icelandic Saga, which spread throughout the Nordic culture and into the English and German languages. It was used to spin stories of the gods, record historic events and glorify heroes.

As Iceland’s capital and main center of the country’s population, the city of Reykjavik is a fascinating blend of the traditional and modernism. Just as Iceland is a unique country – rugged and remote, yet technically advanced and enjoying Nordic standards of affluence – Reykjavik is a highly unusual capital city. It dominates the life of Iceland in almost every way. More than half of the country’s total population of 270,000 is living in and around the capital, and the economy of the entire nation depends on Reykjavik. Nearly 60 percent of Iceland’s imports are received and distributed, and 40 percent of the country’s exports are loaded for shipment via the port of Reykjavik. It is also the headquarters of what is probably the world’s most advanced seafood industry, which counts for Iceland’s number one export.

Date 31/05/2022
Location Patreksfjordur
In 08:00
Out 18:00

Sitting in the finger-like scenery of the Westfjords – which flays out from the mainland to form one of Europe’s most westerly points, Patreksfjordur has barely 700 inhabitants and – like so many Icelandic communities – is built on time-tested fishing traditions. Discover wonderful crowds of birdlife clinging to the dramatic cliffs, as you embark on adventures amid the Westfjords, discovering flat-topped mountains, cutting inlets and evocative, windswept beaches. View less

With their bright beaks and amiable features, puffins are some of the most beautiful birds in the world – and they nest in huge quantities on Látrabjarg cliff, close to Patreksfjordur. Vertically steep and imposing, the birds are safe from predators like foxes here, as they live and breed on the dramatically steep drop-offs. Wander to see them thriving in their natural habitat, clinging to cliff ledges. You can also encounter gannets and guillemots, as well as an estimated 40% of the world’s Razorbill population. Rauðasandur beach is one of Iceland’s more unusual sights, a huge copper-red stretch of sand. Wander the dreamy shoreline, and photograph the remote, colourful collision of sea and sand. You’re also close to the majestic veil of Dynjandi waterfall, which fans out across 60 metres as it descends. After a tough day’s hiking, return to Patreksfjordur to admire fjord views and soak your muscles in an outdoor pool, as the stars begin to appear above. Or head to the muscle-relieving, naturally-heated, geothermal pools that murmur nearby.

Date 01/06/2022
Location Siglufjordur, Iceland
In 08:00
Out 23:00

A tiny town in the scenic north of Iceland, cosseted away by a jagged wall of mountain peaks, Siglufjordur is an isolated gem. With just over a thousand residents, Siglufjordur takes its name from the glassy fjord that stretches out nearby. Iceland’s northernmost town, only a single-lane road tunnel, bored through the snow-capped mountains, provides a land link with the rest of the country. This evocative remoteness appealed to dark Nordic Noir writers – and the town has found recent fame as the star of the TV show Trapped. View less

A much warmer welcome awaits you in real life than in fiction – fortunately. Siglufjordur is a historic Atlantic capital of herring fishing, and you can learn of the industry that gave the town its raison d’etre, and powered Iceland’s economy at the award-winning Herring Era Museum. The biggest maritime-themed museum in Iceland, it spreads across three buildings and covers every element of the town’s relationship with its fishing waters – from expedition to preparation and preservation. While the industry has dried up since its heyday, wander to the harbour for views of the pretty town’s cherry and lemon coloured former warehouses. Swirling seagulls look for offcuts, while fishermen sandpaper and varnish tiny vessels. Take a boat out around the scenic fjord, or embark on lengthy hikes out and above this romantically isolated outpost. The sounds of beautiful duo vocal harmonies and accordions are often heard echoing along the streets, and the Folk Music Museum is an enchanting look into quaint, rural Icelandic culture. The Folk Music Festival causes the town’s population to swell dramatically, as visitors make for these picturesque shores to play and perform each year.

Date 02/06/2022
Location Akureyri, Iceland
In 08:00
Out 22:00

Iceland’s Capital of the North is the gateway to a thrilling land of roaring waterfalls, soaring volcanoes and glorious wildlife. It may lie a mere 60 miles from the Arctic Circle, but Akureyi blossoms with a bright, cosmopolitan feel, and explodes into life during the summer months, when its outdoor cafes and open-air bathing spots fill up with visitors ready to immerse themselves in Iceland’s cinematic scenery. Feel the thundering impact of Iceland’s celebrated natural wonders shaking your bones at Godafoss Waterfalls, known as the ‘Waterfalls of the Gods’.

Here, the Skjálfandafljót river unleashes a colossal torrent of water over charcoal-black rocks below. Or, find some peace at the Botanical Gardens, which opened in 1957 and offer space for contemplation – amid plants that bloom with unexpected vibrancy, even at this northerly latitude. The Lutheran, Akureyrarkirkja Church rises like a grand church organ and is the town’s most striking landmark. The 112-step climb is worth the effort to see light flooding in through its narrow stain glass windows, spreading colourful patchworks across the interior. Magic and mythology are important elements of Icelandic folklore, and you’ll even bump into giant sculptures of grizzled, child-snatching trolls on the town’s high street. Or, meet more earthly – but no less magical – creatures in the waters around Akureyi, where immense blue whales cruise by and dolphins playfully leap. A trip to the northerly Grimsey island will take you on an inspiring adventure traversing the Arctic Circle to a remote island where flame-beaked puffins nod on cliff-side perches and razorbills nest. Brush up on your puffin-watching skills with our blog.

Date 03/06/2022
Location Husavik
In 07:00
Out 18:00

There’s simply nowhere better than Husavilk – the European capital of whale watching – for getting up close and personal with the majestic giants of the ocean. Feel the awe as whales breach the waves around you, before gulping in air and plunging away with almighty tale flicks. Pretty Husavik is framed by the majestic Húsavíkurfjall mountain, which swells up behind, creating a stunning backdrop for the town’s tiny wooden warehouses, cherry red houses and undulating fishing ships. View less

The little wooden church has been a beacon of light, guiding tired fishermen back to the shores of Iceland’s oldest settlement, since 1907. Let the wind rip through your hair and the sea speckle your face, as you ride waves out among the region’s almighty marine creatures, who throw their weight around so spectacularly. Sail among gentle giants in Shaky Bay, spotting humpbacks, minke whales and the world’s biggest – blue whales. You may also see teams of smaller white-beaked dolphins skipping across the waves, displaying the full range of acrobatic skills. The town’s whale museum is an interesting journey through Iceland’s relationship with the sea giants, while its restaurants serve up local specialities – taste juicy reindeer burger and plokkfiskur, a buttery mash of local fish. Hikes and horseback rides into the surrounding countryside can take you up around Lake Botnsvatn, to views down from the slopes of the Húsavíkurfjall – where purple spired lupin flowers spill down amongst the emerald slopes. From the summit, look out over views of the bay, reaching out to the crumpled snowy peaks beyond. Or feel the full force of this land of natural power, at Dettifloss Waterfall, one of Europe’s most powerful, thrashing flumes.

Date 04/06/2022
Location Seydisfjordur, Iceland
In 08:00
Out 23:00

Seydisfjordur,, a beautiful 19th-century Norwegian village on the east coast of Iceland, is regarded by many as one of Iceland’s most picturesque towns, not only due to its impressive environment, but also because nowhere in Iceland has a community of old wooden buildings been preserved so well as here. Poet Matthías Johannessen called Seydisfjordur a ‘pearl enclosed in a shell’.

Date 05/06/2022
Location Djupivogur
In 07:00
Out 18:00

Slow the pace, and discover the refreshing approach to life that Djupivogur has made its trademark. You can leave your phone behind as you step out into this Icelandic town, which has won awards celebrating its leisurely outlook and stubborn rebellion against the frenetic pace of modern life. After all, who needs emails and notifications when you have some of the most humbling monochrome scenery and gashed fjords, waiting on your doorstep? Sitting on a peninsula to the south-east of Iceland, the glacial approach to life here wins many hearts.

A place where hammers knock on metal in workshops, artists ladle paint onto canvases, and wild ponies roam across mountains, Djupivogur is an uninhibited artistic hub – full of makers and creatives. The most expansive project is the 34 egg sculptures that dot the coastline, created by the Icelandic artist, Sigurður Guðmundsson. Each egg represents a different native bird species. Fishing remains the primary industry, and you can savour the soft fruits of the labour in restaurants serving up smoked trout and fish soup within their cosy confines. Wander the surrounding landscapes, where snow-freckled mountains rise, and lazy seals lie on dark rock beaches, to feel Djupivogur’s natural inspiration seeping under your skin. Alive with greens and golds in summer, further ventures reveal bright blue glaciers and the sprawling waterfalls of Vatnajökull National Park. The cliff-hugging puffins of Papey Island are a short boat ride away, while Bulandstindur Mountain’s pyramid shape is a stand out even among these fairy-tale landscapes.

Date 06/06/2022
Location Torshavn
In 12:00
Out 23:00

More than 600 miles (nearly 1,000 kilometres) from Denmark’s west coast lie the Faroes, a triangle of eighteen windswept islands, seventeen of which are inhabited. Only 48,500 people plus some 70,000 sheep roam these remote lands. Much of the islands’ heritage reflects a medieval past, beginning with the arrival of farmers from western Norway who settled here in the 9th century. Evidence of this Scandinavian heritage is preserved through centuries of isolation; ancient structures can still be seen in villages clustered around old churches.

Date 07/06/2022
Location At Sea
In
Out

Calling all skywatchers, umbraphiles and astronomers! Extremely rare and very exciting, a full solar eclipse is a bucket list experience if ever there was one. Scheduled for 4th December, 2021 the next eclipse will take place only in Antarctica and we will be positioned in the small path of totality for maximum effect. This experience is not available for the average cruisers; imagine being surrounded by brilliant light one minute, then complete blackout the next, before enjoying the mysterious shadow-play as we wind back to the blinding white of Antarctica.

Watch how the curious wildlife will react to the eclipse, making sure to note their behaviour and let the onboard naturalist know. Other onboard expedition staff will share their insightful knowledge in order to help you gain a better understanding of this phenomenal phenomenon. As if a trip to the seventh continent was not special enough!

Date 08/06/2022
Location Heimaey, Iceland
In 08:00
Out 18:00

Rising like craggy icebergs from the waves, Heimaey and the Westman Islands are a perfect example of nature’s extraordinary power to both create and destroy. Haunted by the same volcanic forces that once forged the islands, it was only the brave actions of the island’s villagers – who stopped the flow of lava from the Eldfell volcano with a wall of seawater – that saved this charming whitewash wooden town from destruction. View less

The volcano that exploded in 1973 made headline news around the globe and saw the islanders evacuated during an elaborate rescue mission. Learn more of the most fateful day in the islands’ history at the museum, and see houses – charred black by lava – which have been salvaged and exhibited, frozen in time. The volcanic forces created a beautiful mosaic of craggy islands, just off-shore from the mainland. Alive with animal life – pods of orca whales roll through the Atlantic’s choppy waves, seabirds call in the skies overhead, and baby puffins take tentative first steps on the cliffs hugging these islands. You’ll notice that the islanders have a particular bond with the 8 million Atlantic puffins who live here. Statues of the birds stand on the streets, and extraordinary rescue missions sometimes take place at night – when locals comb the streets to help return lost pufflings to their cliffside homes. Be sure to walk out along the coast to Stórhöfdi, to view the extraordinary colony of these remarkable, adorable birds that live here. For some more tips on spotting the puffins, take a look at our blog.

Date 09/06/2022
Location Reykjavik, Iceland
In
Out

The fire, frost and water symbolized by the red, white and blue of Iceland’s flag are manifested by the ice and snow of its glaciers, the hot mud pools, geysers and glowing lava flows in the country’s volcanic regions.
The island’s settlement dates back to 874 when a Norwegian named Ingolf Arnarson arrived at present-day Reykjavik. In 930, the settlers formed a legislature, the Alting, which was the beginning of the Commonwealth of Iceland. From the 10th to the 14th centuries, Iceland developed a literary form, the Icelandic Saga, which spread throughout the Nordic culture and into the English and German languages. It was used to spin stories of the gods, record historic events and glorify heroes.

As Iceland’s capital and main center of the country’s population, the city of Reykjavik is a fascinating blend of the traditional and modernism. Just as Iceland is a unique country – rugged and remote, yet technically advanced and enjoying Nordic standards of affluence – Reykjavik is a highly unusual capital city. It dominates the life of Iceland in almost every way. More than half of the country’s total population of 270,000 is living in and around the capital, and the economy of the entire nation depends on Reykjavik. Nearly 60 percent of Iceland’s imports are received and distributed, and 40 percent of the country’s exports are loaded for shipment via the port of Reykjavik. It is also the headquarters of what is probably the world’s most advanced seafood industry, which counts for Iceland’s number one export.

Date 10/06/2022
Location At Sea
In
Out

Calling all skywatchers, umbraphiles and astronomers! Extremely rare and very exciting, a full solar eclipse is a bucket list experience if ever there was one. Scheduled for 4th December, 2021 the next eclipse will take place only in Antarctica and we will be positioned in the small path of totality for maximum effect. This experience is not available for the average cruisers; imagine being surrounded by brilliant light one minute, then complete blackout the next, before enjoying the mysterious shadow-play as we wind back to the blinding white of Antarctica.

Watch how the curious wildlife will react to the eclipse, making sure to note their behaviour and let the onboard naturalist know. Other onboard expedition staff will share their insightful knowledge in order to help you gain a better understanding of this phenomenal phenomenon. As if a trip to the seventh continent was not special enough!

Date 11/06/2022
Location Runavik
In 08:00
Out 18:00
Date 12/06/2022
Location At Sea
In
Out

Calling all skywatchers, umbraphiles and astronomers! Extremely rare and very exciting, a full solar eclipse is a bucket list experience if ever there was one. Scheduled for 4th December, 2021 the next eclipse will take place only in Antarctica and we will be positioned in the small path of totality for maximum effect. This experience is not available for the average cruisers; imagine being surrounded by brilliant light one minute, then complete blackout the next, before enjoying the mysterious shadow-play as we wind back to the blinding white of Antarctica.

Watch how the curious wildlife will react to the eclipse, making sure to note their behaviour and let the onboard naturalist know. Other onboard expedition staff will share their insightful knowledge in order to help you gain a better understanding of this phenomenal phenomenon. As if a trip to the seventh continent was not special enough!

Date 13/06/2022
Location Alesund, Norway
In 08:00
Out 18:00

Decorative turrets, pastel-coloured paint and elegant buildings reflect in the glass-smooth harbour waters of Ålesund, welcoming you to one of the world’s finest havens of Art Nouveau architecture. A perfect complement of natural and man-made beauty, the city’s distinctive jugendstil style is enhanced by a thrilling location amid colossal fjord scenery. Geirangerfjord World Heritage Site of is one of Norway’s most spectacular fjords, and it comes alive in summer with gushing meltwater falls plummeting from steep banks to pristine water below. View less

Undoubtedly one of the most beautiful towns in Norway, practically every building in Ålesund boasts fantastical flourishes and eccentric quirks. Rebuilt from the ashes of the devastating fire that swept through in 1904, the town is now a unique historic treasure trove. Wander fairy-tale cobbled streets, and admire endless dainty turrets and decorative swirls, before reaching the Aksla Viewpoint and letting the true majesty of the town’s dreamlike setting wash over you, while gazing over its archipelago. Enjoy a sugar-kick with a bite of folded svele – an indulgent, buttery Norwegian pancake – or settle in to a cosy restaurant for something a little more substantial. Ålesundis a town built on sea trade, and a regular haul of fjord cod is brought ashore before being distributed right across the world. Dried, salted cod – known as klipfish – is a particular speciality, with Ålesund producing an incredible two thirds of the world’s supply.

Date 14/06/2022
Location Olden, Norway
In 08:00
Out 18:00

The village of Olden clings to the banks of the Nordfjord, surrounded by steep mountains and lovely valleys. Boating on the fjord, hiking on nearby scenic mountain trails, as well as salmon and sea-trout fishing in the River Olden combine to make this small town an enjoyable holiday destination.

The summer season brings visitors to the area who are interested in glacier skiing on the Briksdal Glacier and the Jostedal Glacier, Europe’s biggest.

Enthusiasts enjoy not only challenging skiing but the ride up to the glacier aboard local horse drawn carriages. These powerful, yet compact, miniature horses are accustomed to climbing up this mountainous terrain. Most of us would consider it a bit too enthusiastic actually swim in the waters found pooled atop these slopes. These chilling pools are a bit more “refreshing” than most of us would like, for they feature tiny icebergs that float along past those brave enough to actually swim here.

The scenery along the fjord is varied, featuring well-kept farms and verdant orchards which stand in stark contrast to the startling whiteness of the glaciers and the gray rock faces of towering mountains. The adjacent lake provides summertime watersports for Norwegians and visitors alike.

Olden was, for many years, home to American landscape artist William H. Singer, scion of a Pittsburgh steel family. A philanthropist, Singer underwrote such endeavors as the construction of a much-needed road and the very important regional hospital.

Date 15/06/2022
Location Flam, Norway
In 08:00
Out 18:00

If we haven’t said it already, Norway’s luxury is its sheer natural beauty. And at the very top of the pile is the all-inclusive Flam, a destination that is home to Glacial waterways lined by evergreen forests amidst jagged mountains and sheer cliff walls. Situated inland, on the arm of the 204-kilometre Sognefjord, the village has just 400 inhabitants. Its little size does not belie its gigantic heart, and Flam’s expansive loveliness knows no bounds.

In fact, UNESCO has dedicated the Sognefjord as a World Heritage Site for its exquisite natural beauty. There are many ways to imbibe in the beauty of this destination. Some of the more peaceful among you will enjoy just drinking it all in from the veranda or deck of your ship, while adrenaline bunnies will most probably want to jump in a Zodiac and gain first-hand experience that way. But beware! Travelling the shores of one of the deepest fjords may be exciting but it is also fast, wet and bumpy! Most visitors will not want to miss out on a one-hour train journey that has been describes by more than one source as being “the world’s most beautiful”. The Flam railway is iconic and will have you holding your breath as your travel through steep, winding roads, around massive mountains, and past gushing rivers and waterfalls. Scary? A little. Picturesque? No question. Worth it? Most definitely.

Date 16/06/2022
Location Bergen, Norway
In 08:00
Out 22:00

The crooked, pastel-coloured warehouses of Bergen’s World Heritage waterfront lean together charmingly, welcoming visitors to this city at the heart of Norway’s most extraordinary cinematic landscapes. It may be the country’s second largest city, but the villagey feel here always provides a warm welcome – even when the weather is living up to its famously damp reputation. Bergen’s colourful waterfront, Bryggen, is a ramshackle line-up of incredible Hanseatic warehouses, built following the devastating fire of 1702, which ransacked the city.

These iconic warehouses have stood proudly ever since, with Bergen growing and expanding around the colourful facades. Behind them, a labyrinth of narrow alleyways and wooden decking waits, alive with artisan craft shops and bustling galleries. Fløyen mountain watches over the city, and you can take a short but steep hike up to the panoramic viewpoints, or jump on the funicular, which trundles visitors up and down the incline. At the top, spectacular views of Bergen jutting out into the dark seas below unfold before your eyes. Wait until evening to see the sunset painting glorious golden light across the city and waves, and Bergen’s lights flickering into life. Nærøyfjorden, a deeply etched fjord nearby, is perhaps Norway’s most photographed and iconic piece of scenery. A cruise through the base of this spectacular narrow fjord, parting the glass-smooth inky waters, is an utterly humbling experience, as the claustrophobically-close slopes rise imposingly over you. Sognefjord also stretches out nearby, and is Norway’s longest fjord, adorned with plunging waterfalls and vibrant farms during summer.

Date 17/06/2022
Location Stavanger, Norway
In 08:00
Out 17:00

Located on the west coast of southern Norway and, with a population of 100,000 the country’s fourth largest city, Stavanger is something of a survivor. While other Norwegian coastal towns have experienced serious decline because of the precarious fortunes of fishing, Stavanger has over the years grown into one of the country’s most dynamic economic power bases, thanks to the creation of a merchant fleet, fish canning, shipbuilding and, more recently, the oil industry. With more than 3,000 foreign oil business people residing here who have made English virtually the first language, Stavanger is often referred to as the “Oil Capital of Norway.” To support the offshore oilfields, the port serves refineries and is also involved in the construction of oil rigs.
Today’s Stavanger is a charming blend of fishing village and modern city, sprinkled with parks, gardens and lakes. The elegant old town with its 12th century cathedral deserves a closer look, and the Canning and Maritime Museums are well worth a visit.
Along the length of the harbor, on Torget, is a small daily market with colorful stands of flowers, fruit and vegetables. Teeming water tanks on the quayside hold a variety of fresh fish. The area around the eastern side of the harbor makes up the town’s shopping district, a bright mix of spidery lanes, pedestrian streets and white-timbered houses that occupy the site of the original settlement of medieval Stavanger.
Outside of town, one can take a trip to the top of Pulpit Rock and other fine lookout points to enjoy the magnificent view. In addition, a worthwhile trip can be made to Utstein Kloster, which was founded in the 13th century and is Norway’s oldest and best preserved abbey.

Date 18/06/2022
Location Oslo, Norway
In
Out

The capital of Norway since 1299, Oslo is the nation’s largest city. Located on an island-studded fjord, with its forest-clad hills and lakes in the hinterland, Oslo provides recreational opportunities that few capital cities can match.
According to historians, the city was founded in 1050 by Harold III. In later years, Hakon V declared Oslo the capital of Norway and built Akershus Castle. As the country’s capital, Oslo is the royal residence, seat of government, Supreme Court, and also the site of Norway’s oldest university.

Through its 950-year history, the city suffered many fires, including an especially devastating one in 1624. As a result, Oslo presents a mixture of several architectural styles.

Visitors will find a full range of activities among the numerous galleries, museums, restaurants, nightclubs and theaters. With a fairly compact city center, many of Oslo’s attractions can be reached on foot; ferryboats departing from the harbor can easily reach the Bygdøy peninsula.

Date 19/06/2022
Location Oslo, Norway
In
Out

The capital of Norway since 1299, Oslo is the nation’s largest city. Located on an island-studded fjord, with its forest-clad hills and lakes in the hinterland, Oslo provides recreational opportunities that few capital cities can match.
According to historians, the city was founded in 1050 by Harold III. In later years, Hakon V declared Oslo the capital of Norway and built Akershus Castle. As the country’s capital, Oslo is the royal residence, seat of government, Supreme Court, and also the site of Norway’s oldest university.

Through its 950-year history, the city suffered many fires, including an especially devastating one in 1624. As a result, Oslo presents a mixture of several architectural styles.

Visitors will find a full range of activities among the numerous galleries, museums, restaurants, nightclubs and theaters. With a fairly compact city center, many of Oslo’s attractions can be reached on foot; ferryboats departing from the harbor can easily reach the Bygdøy peninsula.

Date 20/06/2022
Location Aalborg
In 09:00
Out 18:00

Denmark’s fourth largest city comes with what Danes do best – Viking landscapes, modernist architecture, superb local food and lots (and lots) of good beer. Starting with number one, visitors to Aalborg will need to experience the strange otherworldliness that is Lindolm Hoje. One of Scandinavia’s best preserved Viking burial sites, the impressive site was covered over by a sand dune in around 1000 AD, thus preserving the stone markings.

Archaeologists from the National Museum began a proper excavation of the site in 1889 but it wasn’t until 1958 that the site’s potential was fully realised. Widely considered be the most notable of ancient landmarks in Denmark, no visit to Aalborg is complete without a visit here. History lovers will want to continue their tour of this pretty Danish town by not missing out on Voergaard Castle – one of the best preserved renaissance castles in Denmark. The castle houses an extensive and unique collection of European art and furniture, including works by Goya, Rubens, Raphael and El Greco, together with treasures from the personal belongings of Napoleon 1, Louis XIV and Marie-Antoinette. If you prefer your landscapes more urban than historical, then not to be overlooked is Aalborg’s architecture. Think a Jon Utzon (the man behind the Sydney Opera House) cultural centre, one of the best concert halls in Europe and a repurposed power plant, and you have culture galore at your fingertips. If all that has made you hungry then expect a gastronomic voyage with anything from fine dining to a covered street food market. Washed down by a locally produced beer – of course! Aalborg is home to six microbreweries so visitors are spoilt for choice.

Date 21/06/2022
Location Copenhagen, Denmark
In
Out

Effortlessly cool and down to earth, Copenhagen is a contemporary, clean and classy highlight of Scandinavia. A city built to be liveable, Copenhagen has refused to compromise, resulting in a forward-thinking metropolis that’s green and clean. Swim in the waters of Havnebadet Islands during summer, or shelter from winter’s bite by snuggling in beside a roaring open fire during winter. You can even hop on a train to Sweden, traversing the famous span of a Nordic Noir star – the Öresund Bridge.

It takes just a touch over half an hour to step off the train in Malmö. There’s only one way to truly explore Copenhagen and that’s on two wheels. Easy bike hire schemes will get you moving across this flat city, designed with bikes at the forefront of the mind. Choose a model with electronic assistance to take the strain out of any journey, giving you the freedom to whizz around and explore the modern angular architecture of the centre, and the pastoral colours of Nyhavn waterfront. Head out to the Little Mermaid statue, inspired by Hans Christian Andersen’s fairy tale – the strikingly-restrained statue is the perfect landmark for Copenhagen; unshowy, self-assured and utterly irresistible. The Danish concept of hygge is very much alive here, and you’ll feel that warm cosy feeling as you visit cafes illuminated by the warm glow of hanging filament bulbs, and stuffed to the brim with thick, dusty books. Home to mega-brewer Carlsberg, Copenhagen is also a city for hop enthusiasts, and there is a thriving craft brewing scene to sample. Danish Smørrebrød sandwiches are a must try, or for something a little more substantial, settle in for a culinary voyage and try a taster menu – the city’s restaurants are littered with Michelin stars.

Date 22/06/2022
Location At Sea
In
Out

Calling all skywatchers, umbraphiles and astronomers! Extremely rare and very exciting, a full solar eclipse is a bucket list experience if ever there was one. Scheduled for 4th December, 2021 the next eclipse will take place only in Antarctica and we will be positioned in the small path of totality for maximum effect. This experience is not available for the average cruisers; imagine being surrounded by brilliant light one minute, then complete blackout the next, before enjoying the mysterious shadow-play as we wind back to the blinding white of Antarctica.

Watch how the curious wildlife will react to the eclipse, making sure to note their behaviour and let the onboard naturalist know. Other onboard expedition staff will share their insightful knowledge in order to help you gain a better understanding of this phenomenal phenomenon. As if a trip to the seventh continent was not special enough!

Date 23/06/2022
Location Tallinn
In 07:00
Out 16:00

Estonia’s capital, Tallinn, lies just 53 miles (85 km) from Helsinki across the Gulf of Finland, midway between St. Petersburg and Stockholm. The first recorded stronghold was built here by Estonians in the 10th-century, only to be taken over by the powerful seafaring Danes in 1219. In 1285, Tallinn was incorporated into the successful Hanseatic League, a German mercantile group operating in Northern Europe during medieval times. Because of its strategic location, Tallinn experienced many different occupations over the centuries, which resulted in a cultural mix that lends a unique ambiance to this maritime city.
The proud people of Estonia, along with their Latvian and Lithuanian neighbours, endured Soviet rule for over 50 years. Then in 1991, following the great upheaval in the Soviet Union, these three brave countries proudly joined the world of independent nations and finally enjoyed their freedom.
Estonia is surrounded by water. The country’s 17,000 square miles (27,200 sq. km) include a staggering 800 islands and more than 1,500 lakes. Water sports are quite popular during the summer months and fishing is a national pastime.
The Old Town, with its cobbled streets and 13th- and 14th-century buildings, attracts thousands of visitors each year. They come to admire the city’s heritage of medieval buildings, the imposing Town Hall that dates back to 1454, the Orthodox Cathedral, Toompea Castle and Oleviste Church – all prominent architectural landmarks. Sip coffee in a waterfront café and reflect on recent and current events.

Date 24/06/2022
Location St Petersburg
In
Out

Founded by Peter the Great in 1703, this beautiful city became the designated capital of Imperial Russia from 1712 to 1914 and has remained the country’s cultural capital. The tsar’s brainchild was built according to his plans after draining swampland on the Gulf of Finland. His friends were required to construct their palaces along these newly created canals. The result was a gateway to the West and a distinctly European metropolis with baroque and neo-classical mansions. St. Petersburg’s new cultural life attracted such great figures as Pushkin, Dostoyevsky, Tchaikovsky and Tolstoy.

Date 25/06/2022
Location St Petersburg
In
Out

Founded by Peter the Great in 1703, this beautiful city became the designated capital of Imperial Russia from 1712 to 1914 and has remained the country’s cultural capital. The tsar’s brainchild was built according to his plans after draining swampland on the Gulf of Finland. His friends were required to construct their palaces along these newly created canals. The result was a gateway to the West and a distinctly European metropolis with baroque and neo-classical mansions. St. Petersburg’s new cultural life attracted such great figures as Pushkin, Dostoyevsky, Tchaikovsky and Tolstoy.

Date 26/06/2022
Location St Petersburg
In
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Founded by Peter the Great in 1703, this beautiful city became the designated capital of Imperial Russia from 1712 to 1914 and has remained the country’s cultural capital. The tsar’s brainchild was built according to his plans after draining swampland on the Gulf of Finland. His friends were required to construct their palaces along these newly created canals. The result was a gateway to the West and a distinctly European metropolis with baroque and neo-classical mansions. St. Petersburg’s new cultural life attracted such great figures as Pushkin, Dostoyevsky, Tchaikovsky and Tolstoy.

Date 27/06/2022
Location Helsinki, Finland
In 07:30
Out 14:00

“A thriving, flawlessly-designed seaside city, Helsinki is famously livable and inspiring. A regional powerhouse of outstanding design and creativity, Helsinki lies across a confetti scattering of 300 islands and skerries in the Gulf of Finland. Known for the light granite hue of its buildings – which lend the city a bright, whitewashed appearance – traditional buildings mingle seamlessly with bold new structures, showcasing Finland’s celebrated design outlook. Helsinki Cathedral is the crowning glory – rising high over the city’s waterfront with its pearly white domes gleaming. View less

A city that reveres knowledge and creativity above all else, artworks and statues litter the streets and parks, honouring creative minds of the past. Open parks offer space to lie back and soak up summer’s sun, while sculptures like the abstract organs of the Sibelius Monument celebrate national heroes like composer Jean Sibelius – whose music gave Finland national identity in the quest for independence. Feel the stunning acoustics of the incredible Rock Church deep in your gut, as you witness a performance in this collaboration between man and nature. Built into the rock underground, the amphitheatre’s soaring copper bowl roof is suspended dramatically on a bed of glass windows. One of Helsinki’s many incredible buildings, the Design Museum offers a comprehensive insight into the city’s balance of style, function and form. Helsinki’s easy-going, forward-thinking way of life was hard fought for, and the spectacular Suomenlinna fortress rears out of the waves as a reminder of the historical struggles that have played out in this stretch of sea. The chain of forts covers six islands and was built to defend the archipelago when it fell under Swedish rule. Sail out to the quaint little beaches, and waterfront pathways that now lend a calm, peaceful ambience to this UNESCO World Heritage Site.”

Date 28/06/2022
Location Stockholm, Sweden
In 07:00
Out

Founded in the 13th century, Stockholm is Sweden’s strikingly elegant and beautiful capital, spread out over many islands at the meeting point of the Baltic with Lake Mälaren. Stockholm, noted for its outstanding architecture, is one of Scandinavia’s most attractive cities. In addition to its many man-made monuments, Stockholm boasts a world of natural beauty. One third of the city’s total land area is devoted to parks.
Guided by a strong belief in individual freedom, Sweden is governed by a constitution that is the oldest in use in Europe. The country’s neutrality has allowed it to avoid wars for more than 150 years. Its cities and industries remained intact during both World Wars. A distinct political philosophy has also added significantly to the nation’s success. Many of the country’s social achievements can be attributed to the development of the “welfare state” early in the 20th century. This provides its citizens with excellent medical care and substantial retirement benefits. Sweden is recognized as one of the world leaders in matters of health care and life expectancy. Education standards are high, accounting for the country’s 100% literacy rate.

The Swedes are proud of their country and take great care to preserve its great natural beauty. As the country’s major city, Stockholm offers a wealth of monuments and sites, fine museums and a rich culture. There are also hundreds of excellent restaurants as well as a great selection of trendy boutiques and exciting nightclubs.

Visitors should start their exploration of Stockholm at Gamla Stan, the Old Town located on an island in the center of the city. This is the city’s most attractive part, which has retained its medieval charm. The maze of narrow, cobbled streets is best explored on foot.

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