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Home Cruises Lisbon – Colourful Canaries & Morocco Silver Dawn 2022-11-09

Lisbon – Colourful Canaries & Morocco - DA221109012 Silver Dawn departing 9 Nov 2022

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Silver Dawn
  • Door-to-Door All-Inclusive
  • Private Executive Transfers
  • Butler Service in every Suite
  • Complimentary Beverages
  • Gourmet Dining
  • Gratuities Included
Ship
Cruise Line
Embark
9 Nov 2022
Duration
12 Nights
From / To
Lisbon / Lisbon
Ports of call
Lisbon - Seville - Seville - Casablanca - Lanzarote

Suite from £4,750pp

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Itinerary

Show sea days

Date Date
Location Location
 
In In
Out Out
Date 09/11/2022
Location Lisbon
In
Out 18:00

Lisbon, the capital of Portugal, is a city open to the sea and carefully planned with 18th-century elegance. Its founder is said to be the legendary Ulysses, but the theory of an original Phoenician settlement is probably more realistic. Known in Portugal as Lisboa, the city was inhabited by the Romans, Visigoths and, beginning in the 8th century, the Moors. Much of the 16th century was a period of great prosperity and overseas expansion for Portugal. Tragedy struck on All Saints’ Day in 1755 with a devastating earthquake that killed about 40,000 people. The destruction of Lisbon shocked the continent. As a result, the Baixa (lower city) emerged in a single phase of building, carried out in less than a decade by the royal minister, the Marques de Pombal. His carefully planned layout of a perfect neo-classical grid survived to this day and remains the heart of the city. Evidence of pre-quake Lisbon can still be seen in the Belém suburb and the old Moorish section of the Alfama that sprawls below the Castle of St. George.
Lisbon is a compact city on the banks of the Tagus River. Visitors find it easy to get around as many places of interest are in the vicinity of the central downtown area. There is a convenient bus and tram system and taxis are plentiful. Rossio Square, the heart of Lisbon since medieval times, is an ideal place to start exploring. After a fire destroyed parts of the historic neighborhood behind Rossio in 1988, many of the restored buildings emerged with modern interiors behind the original façades.
The city boasts a good many monuments and museums, such as the Jeronimos Monastery, Tower of Belém, the Royal Coach Museum and the Gulbenkian Museum. High above the Baixa is the Bairro Alto (upper city) with its teeming nightlife. The easiest way to connect between the two areas is via the public elevator designed by Gustave Eiffel.
Cruising up the Tagus River to the ship’s berth, you can already spot three of Lisbon’s famous landmarks: the Monument to the Discoveries, the Tower of Belém and the Statue of Christ, which welcomes visitors from its hilltop location high above Europe’s longest suspension bridge.

Date 10/11/2022
Location Seville
In
Out 17:00

More than a hundred watchtowers gaze out across the waves surrounding this ancient Andalusian city. Sprinkled with evocative cobbled side streets, you’ll explore 3,000 years’ worth of history, while stumbling across palm-tree lined plazas of shaded coffee sippers. Cadiz claims the mantle of Western Europe’s oldest city, and every piece of architecture – and every wrong turn – offers a chance to discover fascinating new tales. Founded by the Phoenicians in 1100BC, Christopher Columbus used the city as a base for his exploratory, map-defining voyages of 1493 and 1502.

The port grew in importance and wealth as Cadiz’s strategic location close to Africa’s northern tip helped it blossom into a centre for New World trade. Catedral de Cádiz, is a display of the city’s wealth and importance, looming spectacularly over the Atlantic’s waves, with cawing seagulls sweeping between its twin bell towers. Inside, treasures from the city’s trading exploits in the West Indies and beyond – which helped fuel the growth of this historically prosperous city – are on display. Enveloped by ocean on almost every side, Cadiz has something of an island feel, and you can cool off from southern Spain’s unrelenting sunshine on the sweeping golden sand beach of Playa Victoria. The two towers of the new El Puente de la Constitución de 1812 mark a contemporary landmark in this most ancient of cities, in the form of a spectacular new road bridge. Torre Tavira, meanwhile, is the most famous of Cadiz’s army of watchtowers, and the highest point in the city. Reach the top for a view of the ocean fringing the city’s expanse, and to learn about the towers – constructed so trading merchants could survey the harbour from their lavish homes. The Central Market is a chaotic place of bartering, where flashing knives dissect fresh fish. Stop in at the orbiting bars to enjoy tapas, freshly prepared with the market’s produce.

Date 11/11/2022
Location Seville
In
Out 18:00

More than a hundred watchtowers gaze out across the waves surrounding this ancient Andalusian city. Sprinkled with evocative cobbled side streets, you’ll explore 3,000 years’ worth of history, while stumbling across palm-tree lined plazas of shaded coffee sippers. Cadiz claims the mantle of Western Europe’s oldest city, and every piece of architecture – and every wrong turn – offers a chance to discover fascinating new tales. Founded by the Phoenicians in 1100BC, Christopher Columbus used the city as a base for his exploratory, map-defining voyages of 1493 and 1502.

The port grew in importance and wealth as Cadiz’s strategic location close to Africa’s northern tip helped it blossom into a centre for New World trade. Catedral de Cádiz, is a display of the city’s wealth and importance, looming spectacularly over the Atlantic’s waves, with cawing seagulls sweeping between its twin bell towers. Inside, treasures from the city’s trading exploits in the West Indies and beyond – which helped fuel the growth of this historically prosperous city – are on display. Enveloped by ocean on almost every side, Cadiz has something of an island feel, and you can cool off from southern Spain’s unrelenting sunshine on the sweeping golden sand beach of Playa Victoria. The two towers of the new El Puente de la Constitución de 1812 mark a contemporary landmark in this most ancient of cities, in the form of a spectacular new road bridge. Torre Tavira, meanwhile, is the most famous of Cadiz’s army of watchtowers, and the highest point in the city. Reach the top for a view of the ocean fringing the city’s expanse, and to learn about the towers – constructed so trading merchants could survey the harbour from their lavish homes. The Central Market is a chaotic place of bartering, where flashing knives dissect fresh fish. Stop in at the orbiting bars to enjoy tapas, freshly prepared with the market’s produce.

Date 12/11/2022
Location Casablanca
In 08:00
Out 23:00

Immortal lines from the silver screen may have imprinted a warm, fuzzy visage of old Casablanca into our minds, but this thriving city is a curious example of what Morocco’s modernity looks like. Glistening white art deco buildings line the wide pathways that sweep through Casablanca, as the sea sparkles like a thin mirage on the horizon. There’s an aura of creativity amid Casablanca’s culture and chaos, helping to make the city one of Morocco’s most curious and compelling.

The Hassan II Mosque took a staggering seven years and 10,000 artists to craft its legacy as the country’s largest mosque, and to bring the world’s tallest minaret to sky-high reality. A vision of cool to the touch marble, cavernous prayer rooms and intricate inlays, the mosque is extraordinary in scale and ambition. Retractable roofs let the sun flood in, while dizzying glass floors dazzle, and the blue Atlantic waves surge below your feet. After that humbling visit, stroll along La Corniche – where surfers glide across rough and tumble waves, and chic cafes offer front-row seats for sweet peppermint teas with a side of people-watching. Casablanca is a diner’s city – boulevards laced with French-fusion restaurants, buzzy beachfront joints, and raw seafood bars provide gem-like offerings fresh from the boat. Those seeking a slice of that golden-age Hollywood romance can wander through the medina, with its unabashed ramshackle feel, and maze of alleyways punctuated with busy barber shops and butchers.

Date 13/11/2022
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 14/11/2022
Location Lanzarote
In 08:00
Out 23:00

Nestled on the east coast of Lanzarote, Arrecife takes its name from the rocky reefs and outcrops that dominate its coastline. This pretty working city has a friendly, authentic feel, and has managed to remain true to its roots as a historic fishing village. There’s a lot to explore, and whether you want to lie back on long swathes of opulent golden sand, or strap on hiking boots to crunch across Lanzarote’s scorched volcanic scenery, this versatile capital has so much to offer.

With castles, caves, sleepy beaches, and a glittering saltwater lagoon, Arrecife is the perfect place to get acquainted with the sun-kissed appeal of the Canary Islands. Lanzarote’s charcoal desert vistas radiate a remarkable luna-like quality, but dotted cacti, waving palms, and bursts of vibrant wildflowers add an accent of colour to the canvas. Arrecife itself boasts apricot-coloured beaches and labyrinthine lanes of white-wash buildings within its Old Quarter, where you can smell fresh fish grilling, and see locals dipping delicious local salty potatoes – papas arrugadas – into colourful sauces. An evening stroll along El Charco de san Gines is a must for watching fishing boats bobbing gently on the lagoon, and watching spectacular sunsets burning across the sky. Standing tall for more than four centuries, Castillo De San Gabriel is located on the tiny island of Islote de los Ingleses, and was once a target for pirates, who would appear menacingly on the Atlantic’s horison. The stalwart 16th-century fortress now serves as the History Museum of Arrecife, and exhibitions inside explore the evolution of the city, and the ancient culture of Lanzarote. The International Museum of Contemporary Art, meanwhile, displays modern and abstract works within the 18th-century San José Castle’s refined setting. See works from Cesar Manrique – the prominent artist and architect whose slick sixties style flair can be admired across the island.

Date 15/11/2022
Location Fuerteventura
In 08:00
Out 23:00

Puerto del Rosario emerged at the end of the 18th century as a small cattle-raising center on the current bay. The city, known then as Puerto de Cabras (port of goats), was transformed in the middle of the 18th century into a prosperous commercial port, a fact which favored it being declared capital of Fuerteventura in 1860, a status which until then was held by Betancuria.

Date 16/11/2022
Location Gran Canaria
In 08:00
Out 19:00

Las Palmas, with a population of about 350,000, is the largest city in the archipelago, situated on the northeast tip of the island. As befits a modern, active city, Las Palmas boasts a number of museums, lovely parks, beaches, and a lively nightlife, providing perfect diversions for the many visitors who flock here. The most important sites are found in Vegueta, the historical center in the southern part of Las Palmas. Among the attractions here are stately old homes with balconies facing narrow streets, of which the most prominent is the Casa de Colon, residence of the first governors of the island. From the south, the city hugs the coast up to the bustling areas of Puerto de la Luz and Santa Catalina, considered to be the modern hub of the city. Las Palmas also serves as the starting point to the spectacular interior as well as to the southern part of the island, where bustling resorts line popular beaches, and the famous sand dunes are found at Maspalomas.

Date 17/11/2022
Location Santa Cruz De La Palma (Canary Islands)
In 08:00
Out 18:00

Santa Cruz de Tenerife is the capital of the island of La Palma. Because of its spectacular vegetation and exuberant natural beauty, it is considered by many the most beautiful of the Canary Islands and referred to as the Pretty Isle – La Isla Bonita. In addition to its outstanding natural attributes, the island boasts a culture full of traditions, cuisine, crafts and folklore from the time of the original inhabitants, who left a variety of archaeological riches. View less

Once an important transatlantic port during colonial days, today Santa Cruz has the look of a genuine open-air museum. With colonial houses and carved balconies lining the streets, the port city retains the old-world charm of its glory days. Acclaimed attractions in the interior include the Taburiente National Park with its giant crater that has been photographed from the Space Shuttle, and the Roque de los Muchachos Astrophysics Observatory, standing on the island’s highest point (7,260 feet) and considered the most important of its kind in the northern hemisphere. The green of the countryside, the abundant water and the floral wealth stands in sharp contrast to the many volcanic cones and lava flows that testify to the island’s origins. The oldest volcanic rocks are estimated to be about 3 to 4 million years of age. There were seven recorded eruptions, the most recent one in 1971. While favored by pleasant temperatures in all seasons, the climate varies enormously between the south and the north of the island. The northeast is known to experience moisture-laden trade winds; the southwest is much drier and sunnier. Along the coastal strip, up to an altitude of 600 feet, temperatures are usually in the 70s, while higher up they drop in the winter time, even to freezing point at elevations above 6,000 feet. Our call to La Palma allows you to discover this island’s amazingly different faces over a relatively small area. Mountains and volcanoes, beaches and forests, tiny villages and breathtaking views make up the impressive profile of La Isla Bonita.

Date 18/11/2022
Location Funchal
In 12:00
Out

Bedecked with dramatic cliffs, fertile mountains and sun-gorged beaches, Madeira is a lush, colourful island of plants, paradise and Portuguese-flavoured pleasures. Bathing in year-round sunshine, Funchal – the lowkey capital of Madeira – is perfect for slowing the pace, and toasting the thrilling scenery with a bottle of the island’s famous wine. Narrow, cobblestone streets line the old town, where whitewash buildings, iron-wrought balconies, and tiled patterns carry echoes of Lisbon. Rua de Santa Maria is the city’s oldest street, and the doors have been vividly painted by local artists.

Sit for a drink, to sample your choice of Madeira’s renowned wines – Boal is the ideal option for those with a sweeter tooth. You’ll also find Corpo Santo Chapel here, one of the few remaining buildings to have survived from the 15th century. Blossoming parks and gardens splash colour around, and the sweet smell of pollen lingers in Parque de Santa Catarina. Look out over Funchal harbour between the fountains and blooming flower beds, as ducks and swans enjoy leisurely days on the lake. Madeira Botanical Garden waits in the hills over the city, along with Palhero Garden – a sophisticated and elegantly landscaped English garden, 500 meters above sea level. For an even more dramatic view of this gorgeous setting, head up to Cap Girao – a rusty-red cliff with a cable car strung up to its sheer drop. The cliff falls away vertically to the vivid blue waters below. Or head down to the sea, to enjoy Funchal’s gorgeous pebble beaches rustling, framed by colossal, craggy cliffs.

Date 19/11/2022
Location Funchal
In
Out 18:00

Bedecked with dramatic cliffs, fertile mountains and sun-gorged beaches, Madeira is a lush, colourful island of plants, paradise and Portuguese-flavoured pleasures. Bathing in year-round sunshine, Funchal – the lowkey capital of Madeira – is perfect for slowing the pace, and toasting the thrilling scenery with a bottle of the island’s famous wine. Narrow, cobblestone streets line the old town, where whitewash buildings, iron-wrought balconies, and tiled patterns carry echoes of Lisbon. Rua de Santa Maria is the city’s oldest street, and the doors have been vividly painted by local artists.

Sit for a drink, to sample your choice of Madeira’s renowned wines – Boal is the ideal option for those with a sweeter tooth. You’ll also find Corpo Santo Chapel here, one of the few remaining buildings to have survived from the 15th century. Blossoming parks and gardens splash colour around, and the sweet smell of pollen lingers in Parque de Santa Catarina. Look out over Funchal harbour between the fountains and blooming flower beds, as ducks and swans enjoy leisurely days on the lake. Madeira Botanical Garden waits in the hills over the city, along with Palhero Garden – a sophisticated and elegantly landscaped English garden, 500 meters above sea level. For an even more dramatic view of this gorgeous setting, head up to Cap Girao – a rusty-red cliff with a cable car strung up to its sheer drop. The cliff falls away vertically to the vivid blue waters below. Or head down to the sea, to enjoy Funchal’s gorgeous pebble beaches rustling, framed by colossal, craggy cliffs.

Date 20/11/2022
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 21/11/2022
Location Lisbon
In 07:00
Out

Lisbon, the capital of Portugal, is a city open to the sea and carefully planned with 18th-century elegance. Its founder is said to be the legendary Ulysses, but the theory of an original Phoenician settlement is probably more realistic. Known in Portugal as Lisboa, the city was inhabited by the Romans, Visigoths and, beginning in the 8th century, the Moors. Much of the 16th century was a period of great prosperity and overseas expansion for Portugal. Tragedy struck on All Saints’ Day in 1755 with a devastating earthquake that killed about 40,000 people. The destruction of Lisbon shocked the continent. As a result, the Baixa (lower city) emerged in a single phase of building, carried out in less than a decade by the royal minister, the Marques de Pombal. His carefully planned layout of a perfect neo-classical grid survived to this day and remains the heart of the city. Evidence of pre-quake Lisbon can still be seen in the Belém suburb and the old Moorish section of the Alfama that sprawls below the Castle of St. George.
Lisbon is a compact city on the banks of the Tagus River. Visitors find it easy to get around as many places of interest are in the vicinity of the central downtown area. There is a convenient bus and tram system and taxis are plentiful. Rossio Square, the heart of Lisbon since medieval times, is an ideal place to start exploring. After a fire destroyed parts of the historic neighborhood behind Rossio in 1988, many of the restored buildings emerged with modern interiors behind the original façades.
The city boasts a good many monuments and museums, such as the Jeronimos Monastery, Tower of Belém, the Royal Coach Museum and the Gulbenkian Museum. High above the Baixa is the Bairro Alto (upper city) with its teeming nightlife. The easiest way to connect between the two areas is via the public elevator designed by Gustave Eiffel.
Cruising up the Tagus River to the ship’s berth, you can already spot three of Lisbon’s famous landmarks: the Monument to the Discoveries, the Tower of Belém and the Statue of Christ, which welcomes visitors from its hilltop location high above Europe’s longest suspension bridge.

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Please call 01246 819 819 to book this cruise