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Home Cruises Lisbon to Piraeus(Athens) Silver Dawn 2024-11-01

Lisbon to Piraeus(Athens) - DA241101016 Silver Dawn departing 1 Nov 2024

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Silver Dawn
Ship
Cruise Line
Embark
1 Nov 2024
Duration
16 Nights
From / To
Lisbon / Athens (Piraeus)
Ports of call
Lisbon - Seville - Casablanca - Tangier - Malaga

Suite from £6,935pp

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Itinerary

Show sea days

Date Date
Location Location
 
In In
Out Out
Date 01/11/2024
Location Lisbon
In
Out 23:00

Lisbon, the capital of Portugal, is a city open to the sea and carefully planned with 18th-century elegance. Its founder is said to be the legendary Ulysses, but the theory of an original Phoenician settlement is probably more realistic. Known in Portugal as Lisboa, the city was inhabited by the Romans, Visigoths and, beginning in the 8th century, the Moors. Much of the 16th century was a period of great prosperity and overseas expansion for Portugal. Tragedy struck on All Saints’ Day in 1755 with a devastating earthquake that killed about 40,000 people. The destruction of Lisbon shocked the continent. As a result, the Baixa (lower city) emerged in a single phase of building, carried out in less than a decade by the royal minister, the Marques de Pombal. His carefully planned layout of a perfect neo-classical grid survived to this day and remains the heart of the city. Evidence of pre-quake Lisbon can still be seen in the Belém suburb and the old Moorish section of the Alfama that sprawls below the Castle of St. George.
Lisbon is a compact city on the banks of the Tagus River. Visitors find it easy to get around as many places of interest are in the vicinity of the central downtown area. There is a convenient bus and tram system and taxis are plentiful. Rossio Square, the heart of Lisbon since medieval times, is an ideal place to start exploring. After a fire destroyed parts of the historic neighborhood behind Rossio in 1988, many of the restored buildings emerged with modern interiors behind the original façades.
The city boasts a good many monuments and museums, such as the Jeronimos Monastery, Tower of Belém, the Royal Coach Museum and the Gulbenkian Museum. High above the Baixa is the Bairro Alto (upper city) with its teeming nightlife. The easiest way to connect between the two areas is via the public elevator designed by Gustave Eiffel.
Cruising up the Tagus River to the ship’s berth, you can already spot three of Lisbon’s famous landmarks: the Monument to the Discoveries, the Tower of Belém and the Statue of Christ, which welcomes visitors from its hilltop location high above Europe’s longest suspension bridge.

Date 02/11/2024
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 03/11/2024
Location Seville
In 08:00
Out 19:00

More than a hundred watchtowers gaze out across the waves surrounding this ancient Andalusian city. Sprinkled with evocative cobbled side streets, you’ll explore 3,000 years’ worth of history, while stumbling across palm-tree lined plazas of shaded coffee sippers. Cadiz claims the mantle of Western Europe’s oldest city, and every piece of architecture – and every wrong turn – offers a chance to discover fascinating new tales. Founded by the Phoenicians in 1100BC, Christopher Columbus used the city as a base for his exploratory, map-defining voyages of 1493 and 1502.

The port grew in importance and wealth as Cadiz’s strategic location close to Africa’s northern tip helped it blossom into a centre for New World trade. Catedral de Cádiz, is a display of the city’s wealth and importance, looming spectacularly over the Atlantic’s waves, with cawing seagulls sweeping between its twin bell towers. Inside, treasures from the city’s trading exploits in the West Indies and beyond – which helped fuel the growth of this historically prosperous city – are on display. Enveloped by ocean on almost every side, Cadiz has something of an island feel, and you can cool off from southern Spain’s unrelenting sunshine on the sweeping golden sand beach of Playa Victoria. The two towers of the new El Puente de la Constitución de 1812 mark a contemporary landmark in this most ancient of cities, in the form of a spectacular new road bridge. Torre Tavira, meanwhile, is the most famous of Cadiz’s army of watchtowers, and the highest point in the city. Reach the top for a view of the ocean fringing the city’s expanse, and to learn about the towers – constructed so trading merchants could survey the harbour from their lavish homes. The Central Market is a chaotic place of bartering, where flashing knives dissect fresh fish. Stop in at the orbiting bars to enjoy tapas, freshly prepared with the market’s produce.

Date 04/11/2024
Location Casablanca
In 08:00
Out 18:00

Immortal lines from the silver screen may have imprinted a warm, fuzzy visage of old Casablanca into our minds, but this thriving city is a curious example of what Morocco’s modernity looks like. Glistening white art deco buildings line the wide pathways that sweep through Casablanca, as the sea sparkles like a thin mirage on the horizon. There’s an aura of creativity amid Casablanca’s culture and chaos, helping to make the city one of Morocco’s most curious and compelling.

The Hassan II Mosque took a staggering seven years and 10,000 artists to craft its legacy as the country’s largest mosque, and to bring the world’s tallest minaret to sky-high reality. A vision of cool to the touch marble, cavernous prayer rooms and intricate inlays, the mosque is extraordinary in scale and ambition. Retractable roofs let the sun flood in, while dizzying glass floors dazzle, and the blue Atlantic waves surge below your feet. After that humbling visit, stroll along La Corniche – where surfers glide across rough and tumble waves, and chic cafes offer front-row seats for sweet peppermint teas with a side of people-watching. Casablanca is a diner’s city – boulevards laced with French-fusion restaurants, buzzy beachfront joints, and raw seafood bars provide gem-like offerings fresh from the boat. Those seeking a slice of that golden-age Hollywood romance can wander through the medina, with its unabashed ramshackle feel, and maze of alleyways punctuated with busy barber shops and butchers.

Date 05/11/2024
Location Tangier
In 08:00
Out 18:00

Set on the Maghreb coast, Tangier is Africa’s outstretched hand to Europe. With its bustling markets and lively waterfront, this city on Morroco’s north is an energetic and invigorating place and an exciting immersion into an incredible continent. The location, on the highly strategic narrowing of the Strait of Gibraltar, made Tangier a vital Phoenician trading town – and the resulting city is an invigorating mesh of cultures and curiosities. View less

Part of the fun of Tangier is the well-rehearsed dance, as you dodge good-natured hawkers, and this is certainly a place to stroll with confidence and purpose. Delve into the mayhem of the walled Medina of Tangier for a rush of stimulation, as bartering and bantering echoes along the tight alleys. Crowded, noisy and busy, you’ll be sold to with a smile as you wander between stands of colourful spices, dried fruits and fabrics in this authentic Moroccan marketplace. Refresh and escape the sun with a fresh orange juice – or a sip of mint tea. Close to the city, you can find the Caves of Hercules, a coastal hollow that opens at both ends. The Phoenicians cut a window in the shape of the African continent, which reveals views of the Atlantic’s waves, and legend says Hercules rested within its confines. From Tangier, you can also venture inland to the Rif Mountains, where gorgeous Chefchaouen – a village of bright blue alleyways – waits. Punctuated by blooming flowers, the entire town is a beautiful, moulded artwork of colour, spilling down the mountain like a waterfall.

Date 06/11/2024
Location Malaga
In 08:00
Out

Situated on Spain’s Costa del Sol, Malaga is the region’s capital and a popular holiday destination. The city is known as the birthplace of Pablo Picasso and for the sweet Malaga dessert wines that come from the hilly vineyards just outside of town. Other points of interest include impressive Gothic architecture, the remains of a Moorish castle and several interesting museums. A pleasant town to explore, Malaga also serves as a popular starting point for trips to Granada and resorts along the Costa del Sol. Granada and the famed Alhambra are the region’s most outstanding attractions. Here, magnificent Moorish palaces and fortifications contrast sharply with Christian churches from Spain’s significant era of the 1492 Reconquest, in which King Ferdinand put an end to eight centuries of Moorish rule. Other worthwhile destinations from Malaga include such well-known resorts as Marbella and the white village of Mijas, located on the hillside above the coastal towns of Torremolinos and Fuengirola.

Date 07/11/2024
Location Malaga
In
Out 17:00

Situated on Spain’s Costa del Sol, Malaga is the region’s capital and a popular holiday destination. The city is known as the birthplace of Pablo Picasso and for the sweet Malaga dessert wines that come from the hilly vineyards just outside of town. Other points of interest include impressive Gothic architecture, the remains of a Moorish castle and several interesting museums. A pleasant town to explore, Malaga also serves as a popular starting point for trips to Granada and resorts along the Costa del Sol. Granada and the famed Alhambra are the region’s most outstanding attractions. Here, magnificent Moorish palaces and fortifications contrast sharply with Christian churches from Spain’s significant era of the 1492 Reconquest, in which King Ferdinand put an end to eight centuries of Moorish rule. Other worthwhile destinations from Malaga include such well-known resorts as Marbella and the white village of Mijas, located on the hillside above the coastal towns of Torremolinos and Fuengirola.

Date 08/11/2024
Location Cartagena (Spain)
In 08:00
Out 17:00

On the crossroads of mighty cultures, this Murcian port has endless ancient stories to share. A valuable natural harbour attracted many civilisations to this sun-bathed, southeasterly setting – following its foundation by the Carthaginians in 227 BC. Blending the imprints left by countless cultures on this global junction, the presence of everyone from the Vandals to the Phoenicians and Moors can be felt as you explore, walking between ruins and celebrated modernist architecture along Calle Mayor. Cartagena is crowned by the soaring Castillo de la Concepcion – rise to the stout castle aboard a panoramic lift. Inside, look through reams of archaeological treasures, or admire the rolling views down over the port and across the waters. Watch out for the electric blue peacocks who strut flamboyantly. Cartagena’s emergence as a visitor destination coincided with a stunning discovery in 1988 – the bowl of a gloriously preserved Roman Theatre. Enter to sit among the grandiose ancient venue, so evocative, you can’t help but imagine the historic performances that have graced its stage. Wander the breezy waterfront, looking across the narrow strait towards Africa’s distant haze, and spotting gleaming warships. Cartagena’s perfect harbour means it has been one of Spain’s oldest strategic navy positions since the 16th century. Settle to enjoy the joys of tapas in lively bars – sampling crisped paella, squid and honeyed-aubergine. Easter’s Semana Santa festivities are typically lively here, as hooded processions, lavish floats and sombre fiery displays roll through the streets.

Date 09/11/2024
Location Palma
In 12:00
Out 19:00

The Balearics are comprised of 16 islands; the three principal ones are Mallorca, Ibiza and Minorca. Carthaginians, Romans, Vandals and Arabs have invaded these islands over the centuries. Ruins show evidence of the prehistoric Talayot civilization, a megalithic culture that flourished here between 1500 BC and the Roman conquest. Today the islands are besieged by invaders of a different sort – hordes of tourists.
Lying 60 miles (97 km) off the Spanish mainland, the islands’ lush and rugged landscape combined with an extremely mild, sunny climate proves irresistible, especially to northern Europeans. As a result, the Balearics boast cosmopolitan resorts with lively nightlife and plenty of sports activities.
Mallorca (also spelled Majorca) is the largest of the islands, with an area of more than 1,400 square miles (3626 sq.km). The scenery is magnificent, with cliffs along indented shorelines jutting out of the sea and mountain ranges sheltering the plains from harsh sea breezes. The fertile plain in the centre is covered with almond and fig trees plus olive groves with some trees more than 1,000 years old. Tall pines, junipers and oaks line the mountain slopes.
Palma de Mallorca is the capital of the archipelago. A cosmopolitan city with sophisticated shops and restaurants, it also offers buildings of spectacular Moorish and Gothic architecture.
In the western part of Mallorca, nestled into the mountains, lies the village of Valldemosa. It is known for its Carthusian Monastery where Frédéric Chopin and George Sand spent the winter of 1838-39.

Date 10/11/2024
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 11/11/2024
Location La Goulette (Tunis), Tunisia
In 08:00
Out 18:00

Until the time of the French protectorate, the medina was very much the center of things. Then, under the French influence, the ville nouvelle (new city) emerged with its major banks, department stores and administrative services. The main focus of ville nouvelle is the wide, tree-lined Avenue Habib Bourguiba. At its western end, this major thoroughfare becomes the Avenue de France, terminating in the Place de la Victoire and the entrance to the medina. Although today the medina has lost some of its importance, it is still a place where traditions can be readily observed and where visitors can get a feel for the local way of life. It features many of the city’s points of interest and countless shops.

Date 12/11/2024
Location Valletta
In 12:00
Out

Perched high on the imposing Sciberras Peninsula, Valletta immediately presents its massive, protective walls and vertical bastions to visitors arriving by sea. Rising to 47 metres in places, the fortifications protect lavish palaces, grand domes and illustrious gardens. Built by the Knights of St John on the narrow peninsular, Valletta is a compact, richly historical treasure trove of Baroque wonders. Ascend to reach the restful, flower-filled Upper Barrakka Gardens, where cannons fire and boom in salute at noon each day, sending echoing cracks of noise out across the waves below. View less

Recognised as 2018’s European Capital of Culture, Valletta is a fascinating and dense haven of history and intrigue. A busy, bustling capital, the breathtaking St John’s Cathedral – commissioned in 1572 – is almost concealed among its narrow streets. The relatively modest exterior is counterpointed by a staggeringly opulent, gold-leaf bathed interior, containing a Caravaggio masterpiece – the shadowy vision of the Beheading of St John. Cinematic and magnificent, Valletta has served as a filming location for Game of Thrones – but real epic history abounds on this rocky isle too. From the prehistoric and megalithic sites of the Hypogeum of Paola and Tarxien, to the fascinating War Museum at Fort St Elmo. Mdina also waits nearby, and the former medieval capital is a striking contrast to the island’s main city. Cars are barred from its streets, and it offers endlessly atmospheric old-time wanders. With a strategic positioning in the Mediterranean, Malta is a jewel that many have wrestled for over the centuries. Independence from Britain was finally achieved in 1964, but the close allegiance remains evident, with English recognised as an official language, cars driving on the left, and red post boxes and telephone gleaming in Malta’s sunshine.

Date 13/11/2024
Location Valletta
In
Out 18:00

Perched high on the imposing Sciberras Peninsula, Valletta immediately presents its massive, protective walls and vertical bastions to visitors arriving by sea. Rising to 47 metres in places, the fortifications protect lavish palaces, grand domes and illustrious gardens. Built by the Knights of St John on the narrow peninsular, Valletta is a compact, richly historical treasure trove of Baroque wonders. Ascend to reach the restful, flower-filled Upper Barrakka Gardens, where cannons fire and boom in salute at noon each day, sending echoing cracks of noise out across the waves below. View less

Recognised as 2018’s European Capital of Culture, Valletta is a fascinating and dense haven of history and intrigue. A busy, bustling capital, the breathtaking St John’s Cathedral – commissioned in 1572 – is almost concealed among its narrow streets. The relatively modest exterior is counterpointed by a staggeringly opulent, gold-leaf bathed interior, containing a Caravaggio masterpiece – the shadowy vision of the Beheading of St John. Cinematic and magnificent, Valletta has served as a filming location for Game of Thrones – but real epic history abounds on this rocky isle too. From the prehistoric and megalithic sites of the Hypogeum of Paola and Tarxien, to the fascinating War Museum at Fort St Elmo. Mdina also waits nearby, and the former medieval capital is a striking contrast to the island’s main city. Cars are barred from its streets, and it offers endlessly atmospheric old-time wanders. With a strategic positioning in the Mediterranean, Malta is a jewel that many have wrestled for over the centuries. Independence from Britain was finally achieved in 1964, but the close allegiance remains evident, with English recognised as an official language, cars driving on the left, and red post boxes and telephone gleaming in Malta’s sunshine.

Date 14/11/2024
Location Taormina
In 08:00
Out 18:00

Hugging a long, sweeping bay, Giardini Naxos welcomes you ashore to some of Sicily’s most scenic and historic sites. Naxos was the first Greek settlement on Sicily, and it is surrounded by remarkable remains and swirling mythology. With a long arc of sun-soaked golden sand, you can kick back by the waves – and cool off with a dip into the sea’s refreshing embrace. Up above the seaside revelry, the spectacular Taormina hillside town perches – containing rich Roman and Greek history. View less

Visit to encounter one of Sicily’s best views, as you look down over the rejuvenating blue of the sea, and the looming backdrop of Mount Etna rising in the distance. The majestic, honey-coloured Greek theatre is a highlight, standing before the distant loom of the volcano. Head towards the puffs of cloud, and wisps of smoke, that gather around the peak of Sicily’s mighty volcano, which is among the most active in Europe. Arrive through vineyards, thriving in this fertile soil, before taking the 1,737-metre incline to the summit of the legendary mountain of fire, across fields of solidified lava flows. Known to the Greeks as the home of the God of Fire, and the one-eyed Cyclops, the mountain continues to amaze and awe with its restless power. Vineyards carpet the scenery – interrupted by occasional cactai and citrus groves – and produce some of Sicily’s most refined flavors. Enjoy a glass of wine on Giardini Naxos’ seafront, and toast your time on these rich Sicilian shores.

Date 15/11/2024
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 16/11/2024
Location Crete
In 08:00
Out 18:00

It may not be the prettiest place in Crete, but Heraklion’s patchwork of history, bustling activity and cultural intrigue makes it the perfect change of pace. This is certainly no sleepy island fishing village, and Greece’s fifth-largest city is adorned with a rich collection of quality museums, ancient ruins from antiquity, and a lively culture of its own. View less

A refreshing shift-up from the many quaint beach towns and fishing villages you’ll encounter in the Greek islands, Heraklion – also known as Iraklio – has great shopping, extraordinary history and is the ideal base for ventures to the archaeological treasures of Crete. Traded by the Arabic, Venetian and Ottoman empires over the years, Heraklion is a multi-layered place with fascinating tales to tell. The city’s impressive Venetian fortress, which waits over the gently rolling waves of the gleaming Mediterranean, welcomes you ashore. A stroll out along the seawall, alongside creaking fishing boats, will take you out to the squat fortifications that have stood since 1540. Climb to the top for views out across the water, back towards the city’s waterfront. The sun-roasted earth outside the city hides treasures from the realms of history, including the Bronze Age remnants of Europe’s oldest city, Knossos. A visit to the fantastic Archaeological Museum of Heraklion ties all of this history together and exhibits relics from the civilisations and eras of Crete’s past. Elsewhere, Daidalou’s pedestrianised paving is a charming stroll through Heraklion’s shops, with streets branching off to café-lined plazas and twinkling fountains. Stop to try local food – like fresh feta and olive sprinkled dakos mezze – all washed down with a sample of local raki brandy.

Date 17/11/2024
Location Athens (Piraeus)
In 07:00
Out

Piraeus, is a port city within the Athens urban area, in the Attica region of Greece. It is located in the Athens Riviera, 8 kilometres southwest of Athens’ city centre, along the east coast of the Saronic Gulf.

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