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Home Cruises Reykjavik to Fort Lauderdale, Florida Silver Cloud 2023-09-08

Reykjavik to Fort Lauderdale, Florida - E4230908C23 Silver Cloud departing 8 Sep 2023

Call now 01246 819 819 to book

Silver Cloud
Ship
Cruise Line
Embark
8 Sep 2023
Duration
23 Nights
From / To
Reykjavik / Fort Lauderdale
Ports of call
Reykjavik - Greenland - Greenland - Aappilattoq - Greenland

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Itinerary

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Date Date
Location Location
 
In In
Out Out
Date 08/09/2023
Location Reykjavik
In
Out 19:00

The fire, frost and water symbolized by the red, white and blue of Iceland’s flag are manifested by the ice and snow of its glaciers, the hot mud pools, geysers and glowing lava flows in the country’s volcanic regions.
The island’s settlement dates back to 874 when a Norwegian named Ingolf Arnarson arrived at present-day Reykjavik. In 930, the settlers formed a legislature, the Alting, which was the beginning of the Commonwealth of Iceland. From the 10th to the 14th centuries, Iceland developed a literary form, the Icelandic Saga, which spread throughout the Nordic culture and into the English and German languages. It was used to spin stories of the gods, record historic events and glorify heroes.

As Iceland’s capital and main center of the country’s population, the city of Reykjavik is a fascinating blend of the traditional and modernism. Just as Iceland is a unique country – rugged and remote, yet technically advanced and enjoying Nordic standards of affluence – Reykjavik is a highly unusual capital city. It dominates the life of Iceland in almost every way. More than half of the country’s total population of 270,000 is living in and around the capital, and the economy of the entire nation depends on Reykjavik. Nearly 60 percent of Iceland’s imports are received and distributed, and 40 percent of the country’s exports are loaded for shipment via the port of Reykjavik. It is also the headquarters of what is probably the world’s most advanced seafood industry, which counts for Iceland’s number one export.

Date 09/09/2023
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 10/09/2023
Location Greenland
In 09:00
Out 16:00
Date 11/09/2023
Location Greenland
In 08:00
Out

The transit through the Sound is one of this voyage’s highlights. Connecting the Labrador Sea with the Irminger Seat, Prince Christian Sound or “Prins Christian Sund” in Danish is named after Prince (later King) Christian VII (1749-1808).

100 km (60 miles ), long and at times just 500 m (1500 ft) wide, this majestic and spectacular fiord throws you back into a Viking era – flanked by soaring snow-topped mountains, rock-strewn cliffs and rolling hills, it is as if time has stood still and one easily forgets that this is the 21st century. As you marvel at the sheer size of the mountains that surround you, with the Arctic waters lapping deceptively at the hull, revel in the silence enveloping you. Icebergs float serenely by, carrying with them the ages of time. Be sure to wear warm clothing as this is one spectacle that you do not want to miss.

Date 11/09/2023
Location Aappilattoq
In 15:00
Out 21:00

If you’re looking for remote and remarkable then you have found it. Cruise through Prince Christian Sound to the western end and you’ll find Aapilattoq, a (very) small Greenlandic village of just 100 inhabitants. The name of the village means “sea anemone” in the local Greenlandic language, and the fact that the village has retained its Inuit name is a good indication of what you can expect; traditional village life much as it has been for the past 100 years.

Hunting and fishing are the main occupations here, and it is not unusual when taking a stroll through Aappilattoq, past the small school (where 22 pupils from ages 3-16 are enrolled) and church, to come across a polar bear skin drying in the wind behind a local dwelling. The village is hidden behind a prominent red rock and towering mountains, which make the village virtually inaccessible by land. Naturally, the Aapilattoq and its surrounding area are phenomenally rich in Arctic wildlife: Arctic fox and Arctic hare live in the countryside around the village while marine mammals include ringed seal, harbour seal, hooded seal, bearded seal, harp seal, humpback whale (typically in summer), minke whale, fin whale, narwhal, and beluga.

Date 12/09/2023
Location Greenland
In 06:30
Out 11:30

There is a wonderful legend that the Vikings named Greenland Green and Iceland Ice in order to confuse potential attackers. Because it is quite the opposite; if Iceland is full of emerald forest, then expect ice in Greenland. Lots and lots of ice. Thus one shouldn’t be too surprised to learn that the name Nanortalik means “place of polar bears”. Although, as Nanortalik is Greenland’s most southerly town, don’t be too disappointed if you don’t see any. In truth, Greenland’s polar bears typically live much further north. View less

What you will see however is Mother Nature at her finest. Vertical cliff walls, sheets of floating sea ice and a plethora of Arctic wildlife that amount to an adventurer’s wonderland. As Nanortalik itself is located on a small island in the southern tip of Greenland, nature is never far away, wherever you find yourself. The optimistically named city centre is surrounded by the pristine waters of Tasermiut Fjord and dotted with the colourful houses you would expect this far north. Traditionally, artisans’ houses were painted different colours to showcase what they did, i.e. commercial houses were red; hospitals were yellow; police stations were black; the telephone company was green and fish factories were blue. Today it is more a case of anything goes! Nanortalik locals are warm and welcoming, and are known to extent the art of Kaffe-Mik to its visitors. This old tradition is where a family invites guests into their home to drink coffee and taste their famous Greenlandic cake.

Date 12/09/2023
Location Greenland
In 16:00
Out 23:00

In the local Kalaallisut language, Uunartoq means ‘hot’, and there is no mystery why. Several warm springs exist in Greenland, but Uunartoq Island is the only site where the waters form a pool warm enough to bathe in. Although not as well known as the famous springs of Iceland, nowhere can challenge Uunartoq for scenery. The picturesque series of steaming pools are backed by some of the best scenery Greenland has to offer. View less

Icebergs larger than city blocks drift through the labyrinth of fjords which make up Southern Greenland, passing as they drift towards the ocean. Mountains pierce the clouds, and the tundra blooms in the long summer days; and there is no better way to appreciate the spectacular wilderness of South Greenland than from the perfectly warmed natural comfort of the Uunartoq hot spring. The ancient crystalline rock of Southern Greenland is nearly two billion years old. A fault in the rock allows water to sink down into the ground, where Earth’s internal heat warms it, causing it to rise again. Uunartoq Island is the site where this water escapes, forming a sandy pool heated constantly from below. Basic changing facilities and a grass walkway to the stone-lined pool allow visitors comfort, while reconnecting with nature. It is believed that the Norse settlers in Greenland knew of and made use of the pool, but the island has never been inhabited, excluding a few summerhouses belonging to local residents.

Date 13/09/2023
Location Greenland
In
Out

The largest town in southern Greenland, Qaqortoq has been inhabited since prehistoric times. Upon arrival in this charming southern Greenland enclave, it’s easy to see why. Qaqortoq rises quite steeply over the fjord system around the city, offering breath-taking panoramic vistas of the surrounding mountains, deep, blue sea, Lake Tasersuag, icebergs in the bay, and pastoral backcountry. View less

Although the earliest signs of ancient civilization in Qaqortoq date back 4,300 years, Qaqortoq is known to have been inhabited by Norse and Inuit settlers in the 10th and 12th centuries, and the present-day town was founded in 1774. In the years since, Qaqortoq has evolved into a seaport and trading hub for fish and shrimp processing, tanning, fur production, and ship maintenance and repair.

Date 13/09/2023
Location Greenland
In 15:30
Out 22:00

18 kilometers northeast of Qaqortoq, Hvalsey is part of Qaqortukulooq, one of the five sites of the UNESCO World Heritage Arctic farming complex Kujataa. Between Eriksfjord to the north and Einarsfjord to the south, the Hvalseyfjord branches off from Einarsfjord. Although Hvalsey is better known for the well-preserved ruins of one of the sixteen churches in the Norse’s Eastern Settlement, the church was in a farmstead known as Thjodhild’s Stead. View less

This farmstead at the northeastern end of the fjord included a large building with living quarters, a hall and livestock pens, as well as other livestock pens, a storage building and a warehouse –the ruins of which can still be seen. The Norse farming laid the foundation for the Inuit farming in later centuries, leading to the UNESCO World Heritage status in 2017. In the 14th century account “Descriptions of Greenland” the abundant fish, a reindeer farm on Reindeer Island and Hvalsey’s name “Whale Island” clearly indicate that the Norse had ample food sources at that time. The church was built in the Anglo-Norwegian style of the 13th century, but is known to have been built over an older graveyard. The farmstead is mentioned in the Icelandic “Book of Settlements” as property of the Kings of Norway, and the last documented event of the Norse in Greenland is a wedding which took place in the church in September 1408. After almost 600 years of abandonment, conservation work had to be done to prevent the seaward wall from collapsing.

Date 14/09/2023
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 15/09/2023
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 16/09/2023
Location St. Anthony
In 06:30
Out 20:00

St. Anthony is a town on the northern reaches of the Great Northern Peninsula of the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. St. Anthony serves as a main service centre for northern Newfoundland and southern Labrador. St. Anthony had a population

Date 17/09/2023
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 18/09/2023
Location St. Pierre (miquelon)
In 06:30
Out 17:00

By heading almost due east from Cap-aux-Meules in Canada, it is possible to reach France in about one day’s worth of steaming! With barely 6,000 inhabitants living on tiny St. Pierre, it is the smallest French Overseas Collective. The residents of St. Pierre are predominantly descendants of Normans, Basque and Bretons and the French spoken is closer to Metropolitan French than to Canadian French. Although Basque is not spoken any longer, the influence is still felt through sport and a Basque Festival.

Date 19/09/2023
Location At Sea
In
Out

Home to a unique 18th-century fortress city, visit Louisbourg to be transported back in time, to an immersive recreation of life in an authentic fortified French outpost. Named Louisbourg after the French King Louis XIV – this easterly settlement was favoured thanks to its position close to the French colonies, and the expedited route it offered across the waves back to Europe. Set among Cape Breton Island’s thrilling, rugged coastal scenery, bask in Louisbourg’s glorious seascapes and evocative, centuries-old history.

Date 20/09/2023
Location Halifax
In 06:30
Out 17:00

A city that thrives on a diet of music, outdoor events and ocean-faring history, Nova Scotia’s capital – and Atlantic Canada’s largest conurbation – oozes salt-licked charm. The star-shaped fortress of Halifax Citadel sits above the city, while down below, Halifax revolves around its bustling harbour. Here, jet-skis skid across the water and heritage ships jaunt out to scenic offshore islands. Music carries on the waterfront’s breeze as summer’s events play out, while a hefty population of pubs and restaurants provides all the space required for sitting back and relaxing. View less

The shorefront boardwalk invites you on a gentle stroll along the waves, wandering back through Halifax’s history. The Canadian Museum of Immigration waits at Pier 21 and was the doorway to a country of opportunity for so many – with over a million immigrants taking their first footsteps into Canada here. The pier’s wooden boards are dotted with cafes, craft shops and artist studios. Sail deeper into seafaring heritage at the maritime museum. As the closest city to the sinking of the Titanic, recovered victims were transported to – and many were buried – in Halifax. The story, and items from the doomed vessel, are displayed in the museum’s collection. Peggy’s Cove lighthouse is nearby, and this immaculate little lighthouse is one of Canada’s favourite, watching out stoically over the Atlantic’s waves. With rich pickings available from its coastal location, the fruits of the sea are served up in the fryers of Halifax’s varied restaurants – try seared scallops and juicy mussels. Round off any meal with a buttery blueberry grunt dessert – delicious when served up warm with a dollop of melting vanilla ice cream.

Date 21/09/2023
Location Bar Harbor
In 11:00
Out 20:00

One of the first spots in the USA to see the first slivers of honey-coloured light each morning, Bar Harbor was the escape of choice for the elite and artistic during the 19th century. They flocked here to indulge in cool, salty sea breezes and sweeping coastal scenery, and left behind a scattering of elaborate, soft-hued mansions in their wakes. Nowadays, many of these ornate structures have discovered a new lease of life, transforming into quirky cute shops and restaurants, and helping downtown to hum with its effortless, easygoing charm.

Get to know Bar Harbor with a wander along Shore Path, taking the looping stroll out along the bay, and spotting the Porcupine Islands emerging from the Atlantic’s waves. But why would you just look at those cresting waves, when you can kayak between them, or sail with colossal humpback whales throwing their weight around? Bar Harbor is all about getting tactile with the amazing nature on your doorstep, and whether it’s biking, rock climbing or sailing, there’s an activity for every inclination here. The 27 miles of Park Loop Road will be the guiding path for your explorations of Acadia National Park, leading you to crumbling oceanside cliffs, evergreen mountains and perched lighthouses. Hike to your heart’s content, visiting sites like the explosive Thunder Hole, where the Atlantic rages, smashes and booms against rocks. You can also see the multi-coloured beaks of puffins flashing in the sun. Afterwards, refuel with an unforgettable, New England–style lobster roll, as you toast the day’s exploits and adventures with ice-cold, Maine craft beers.

Date 22/09/2023
Location Portland, Maine
In 06:30
Out 13:00

The largest city in Maine, Portland was founded in 1632 on the Casco Bay Peninsula. It quickly prospered through shipbuilding and the export of inland pines, which made excellent masts. A long line of wooden wharves stretched along the seafront, with the merchants’ houses on the hillside above.

Date 22/09/2023
Location Cape Cod
In
Out
Date 23/09/2023
Location Newport
In 06:30
Out 19:30

A prime slice of New England coastline, Newport serves up colonial splendour, striking seascapes, and some of the freshest seafood around. One of America’s most historic cities, drop in on the oldest library in the country, visit an incredible fortress city, and wander beside spectacular summer houses. With wild beaches, wineries, breweries and festivals for every season, Newport has lost none of its enticing allure. View less

The fresh, ocean air of Newport was much sought after during the Gilded Age, as the rich and powerful made their mark, building grand and stately mansions overlooking the waves. These magnificent houses – and landscaped gardens – add whitewash grandeur to the beautiful stretch of coastline. Take the 3.5-mile coastal walk, out across rugged cliffs with birds calling out, and wildflowers dotting the path. Be warned that the walk does become a little more difficult as it progresses. Stroll the coast, and sit to watch surfers catching Atlantic rollers, or take the twists and turns of Newport’s incredible ocean drive, to soak in the wonderful views by road. Laced with underground tunnels, Fort Adams is Newport’s sprawling complex military fortress. Surrounded by Fort Adams State Park, you can enjoy the relaxed surroundings, absorbing scenic views of the harbour and Narragansett Bay. Unpack a picknick on the grass, as the swells of music carry on the sea breeze – especially during the annual folk and jazz festivals. Or try great Newport seafood in the bustling eateries of repurposed wharves – serving up Rhode Island specials like steamed lobster and clams.

Date 24/09/2023
Location New York
In 08:00
Out 23:00

The city comprises the central island of Manhattan along with four other boroughs: Brooklyn, Queens, the Bronx and Staten Island. To many, Manhattan is New York. The 22-square-mile island is divided into the three districts of Downtown, Midtown and Upper Manhattan. There are countless museums, theaters, restaurants and parks. Many residents never get to see it all in a lifetime, so don’t expect to take it all in during one visit.

Date 25/09/2023
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 26/09/2023
Location Baltimore
In 06:30
Out 20:00

Baltimore is a major city in Maryland with a long history as an important seaport. Fort McHenry, birthplace of the U.S. national anthem, “The Star-Spangled Banner,” sits at the mouth of Baltimore’s Inner Harbor.

Date 27/09/2023
Location Norfolk Island
In 07:30
Out 20:00

750 kilometers northwest of New Zealand and 1400 kilometers east of Gold Coast, NSW, Norfolk Island, an External Territory of Australia consisting of Norfolk Island and uninhabited Phillip Island and Nepean Island, was self-governed until 2015 when it came under the laws of New South Wales. Discovered by Captain Cook in 1774, the island has had different settlements, starting with Polynesians that had already disappeared before Cook’s visit, followed by convicts and soldiers in 1788. This penal colony was abandoned in 1814 yet used again from 1825 to 1855. View less

The Kingston and Arthur’s Vale Historic Area, with its elegantly restored Georgian houses at Quality Row, is among the 11 historic Australian Convict Sites, UNESCO World Heritage. Most of today’s population can be traced back to the 194 descendants of the Bounty mutineers and their Tahitian wives who had left Pitcairn for Norfolk in 1856. In 1867 the Church of England’s Melanesian Mission moved its headquarter to Norfolk. A few years later St Barnabas Chapel was built of stone from the ruins of the New Gaol. The wooden seats have beautiful mother-of-pearl inlay work in Solomon Island style. 14% of the island is national park and the Botanical Gardens feature plants that are endemic to Norfolk Island. Golden Whistlers, Sacred Kingfisher and Norfolk’s symbolic Green Parrot can often be seen and heard. Norfolk and close by Phillip and Nepean Islands are important breeding sites for seabirds such as Red-tailed Tropicbirds, Sooty Terns, Wedge-tailed Shearwaters, and Masked Boobies.

Date 28/09/2023
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 29/09/2023
Location Charleston
In 06:30
Out 23:00

Glorious golden beaches, fiery sunsets and verdant tropical backdrops await at Nevis – a picturesque sliver of Caribbean heaven, and the smaller twin of Saint Kitts. The sight of the island’s golden sands, lying before the verdant backdrop of Nevis Peak’s clouded taper, is sure to mesmerise you – just as it moved Christopher Columbus, the first European to encounter these majestic islands in 1493. Charlestown serves as the laidback capital of Nevis and is peppered with a charming assortment of baby blue colonial architecture.

The perfume of incense hangs heavy in the air at the Botanical Gardens of Nevis – where orchids open up in the bright sunshine, and fountains trickle among the green haven of tropical plants. The simple pleasure of a vivid sunset is one of a myriad of reasons why Nevis is such a sought-after destination, and the nightly explosions of salmon-pinks and blood-reds that spill across the sky never fade in impact. Head to the magnificent Pinney’s Beach – which stretches for more than three miles – to stroll through turquoise water and caramel-coloured sand. Lovers Beach offers an alternative flavour in a quieter, breathlessly romantic setting – laying out views across the Atlantic rollers to St Kitts before you. Shipwrecks wait, strewn just offshore, and enthusiastically embraced by abundant marine life. Scuba dive to explore the skeletal wrecks first hand, as clownfish zip between the broken boughs of doomed vessels. Booby High Shoals is a popular diving spot where you can meet curious sea turtles, gliding through the water.

Date 30/09/2023
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 01/10/2023
Location Fort Lauderdale
In 06:30
Out

With its heady mix of Creole culture and French sophistication, there is more than a pinch of je ne sais quoi in Fort de France. The capital of Martinique, and by far the biggest city in the whole of the French West Indies, if you are looking for Paris in the Caribbean, you’ll find it in Fort de France.

The island has been under French govern since 1638 when the first governor of Martinique Jacques Dyel du Parquet commissioned a fort (from which the city takes its name) to keep out invaders. Not even an unsuccessful attack by the British in 1720, nor the French Revolution in 1789, has been able to shake the French govern of the island and today the city’s French and Creole heritage are impossible to untangle. The colonial past is everywhere, take a stroll down the narrow streets and enjoy the remarkable architecture of the Schœlcher Library, St. Louis Cathedral and the Old Town Hall. Among the many legacies Dyel du Parquet left on the island is sugarcane. A drive through the tropical forests will not only reward you with trees bending under the weight of papayas, mangoes and bananas, but will also afford superb vistas of the elegant plant swaying in the breeze. The arrival and subsequent export of sugar brought the French bourgeoisie in their droves and many of their mansions are still standing. Josephine de Beauharnais, the Napoleonic Empress of “not tonight” fame, hails from the island and those interested will find her childhood home, La Pagerie in nearby Trois Ilets.

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Please call 01246 819 819 to book this cruise