Trustpilot
Enquire Now

Home Cruises Tokyo to Seward (Anchorage, Alaska) - WH230419C30 Silver Whisper departing 19 Apr 2023

Tokyo to Seward (Anchorage, Alaska) - WH230419C30 Silver Whisper departing 19 Apr 2023

Call now 01246 819 819 to book

Silver Whisper
Ship
Cruise Line
Embark
19 Apr 2023
Duration
29 Nights
From / To
Tokyo / Seward
Ports of call
Tokyo - Tokyo - Kobe - Kobe - Hiroshima See full itinerary

Suite from Call for fares

Enquire Now

Itinerary

Show sea days

Date Date
Location Location
 
In In
Out Out
Date 19/04/2023
Location Tokyo
In
Out

Dense and delightful, there’s nowhere else like Japan’s kinetic capital – a city where ancient traditions blend seamlessly with a relentless pursuit for the future’s sharpest edge. See the city from above, as elevators rocket you up to towering viewing platforms, from which you can survey a vast urban ocean, interspersed with sky-scraping needles. Look out as far as the distant loom of Mount Fuji’s cone on clear days. View less

Futuristic – second-accurate – transport seamlessly links Tokyo’s 14 districts, while the glow of flashing advertisement boards, clanks of arcade machines, and waves of humanity flowing along its streets, adds to the sense of mesmerising, dizzying and glorious sensory overload. One of Tokyo’s most iconic sights, don’t miss the flood of people scrambling to cross Shibuya’s famous intersection. Join the choreographed dance, as crowds of briefcase-carrying commuters are given the green light to cross at the same time – bathed in the light of massive neon advertisements. The culture is immensely rich and deep, with 7th-century, lantern-decorated temples, stunning palaces and tranquil scarlet shrines waiting below cloaks of incense and nestling between soaring skyscrapers. Restaurants serve up precisely prepared sushi, and wafer-thin seafood slivers, offering a unique taste of the country’s refined cuisine. Settle into traditional teahouses, to witness intricate ceremonies, or join the locals as they fill out karaoke bars to sing the night away. In the spring, cherry blossom paints a delicate pink sheen over the city’s innumerable parks and gardens.

Date 20/04/2023
Location Tokyo
In
Out 13:30

Dense and delightful, there’s nowhere else like Japan’s kinetic capital – a city where ancient traditions blend seamlessly with a relentless pursuit for the future’s sharpest edge. See the city from above, as elevators rocket you up to towering viewing platforms, from which you can survey a vast urban ocean, interspersed with sky-scraping needles. Look out as far as the distant loom of Mount Fuji’s cone on clear days. View less

Futuristic – second-accurate – transport seamlessly links Tokyo’s 14 districts, while the glow of flashing advertisement boards, clanks of arcade machines, and waves of humanity flowing along its streets, adds to the sense of mesmerising, dizzying and glorious sensory overload. One of Tokyo’s most iconic sights, don’t miss the flood of people scrambling to cross Shibuya’s famous intersection. Join the choreographed dance, as crowds of briefcase-carrying commuters are given the green light to cross at the same time – bathed in the light of massive neon advertisements. The culture is immensely rich and deep, with 7th-century, lantern-decorated temples, stunning palaces and tranquil scarlet shrines waiting below cloaks of incense and nestling between soaring skyscrapers. Restaurants serve up precisely prepared sushi, and wafer-thin seafood slivers, offering a unique taste of the country’s refined cuisine. Settle into traditional teahouses, to witness intricate ceremonies, or join the locals as they fill out karaoke bars to sing the night away. In the spring, cherry blossom paints a delicate pink sheen over the city’s innumerable parks and gardens.

Date 21/04/2023
Location Kobe
In 13:00
Out

The Japanese city of Kobe needs no introduction. The name is synonymous with its home grown superstar. We are not talking of its stunning shrines, cherry trees laden with blossom during sakura or effervescent city, buzzing with life 24/7. We are of course talking of a much more grass roots hero – its eponymous beef. The delicacy might have put the city on the map, but there is far more to Kobe than its meat. Naturally, Kobe wears its cuisine as a badge of honour. View less

Its port history has given it a gastronomy that is quite different from its neighbours. Seafood and sushi is naturally some of the freshest and most diverse you can find, but Kobe’s multi-cultural nature (the city is home to 98 different nationalities) means that it has one of the most diverse gastronomic cultures in Japan. Bread and bakeries are also an (unexpected) delicacy. Additionally, Sake is taken very seriously – Kobe even has its own museum dedicated to the national spirit. Historically, Kobe has always been a key city for Japan. Renamed in 1889, it was known as Owada no Tomari during the Nara Period (710-784 C.E.). Kobe’s location on the calm Inland Sea between Osaka and Kyoto has proven to be pivotal in Japanese history; it is mentioned in famous literary works such as The Tale of Genji (from approximately late 9th century) and the Taiheiki (14th century). The city and region are home to many attractions including the Himeji Castle (widely considered to be Japan’s most beautiful feudal castle), a short ride away.

Date 22/04/2023
Location Kobe
In
Out 18:00

The Japanese city of Kobe needs no introduction. The name is synonymous with its home grown superstar. We are not talking of its stunning shrines, cherry trees laden with blossom during sakura or effervescent city, buzzing with life 24/7. We are of course talking of a much more grass roots hero – its eponymous beef. The delicacy might have put the city on the map, but there is far more to Kobe than its meat. Naturally, Kobe wears its cuisine as a badge of honour. View less

Its port history has given it a gastronomy that is quite different from its neighbours. Seafood and sushi is naturally some of the freshest and most diverse you can find, but Kobe’s multi-cultural nature (the city is home to 98 different nationalities) means that it has one of the most diverse gastronomic cultures in Japan. Bread and bakeries are also an (unexpected) delicacy. Additionally, Sake is taken very seriously – Kobe even has its own museum dedicated to the national spirit. Historically, Kobe has always been a key city for Japan. Renamed in 1889, it was known as Owada no Tomari during the Nara Period (710-784 C.E.). Kobe’s location on the calm Inland Sea between Osaka and Kyoto has proven to be pivotal in Japanese history; it is mentioned in famous literary works such as The Tale of Genji (from approximately late 9th century) and the Taiheiki (14th century). The city and region are home to many attractions including the Himeji Castle (widely considered to be Japan’s most beautiful feudal castle), a short ride away.

Date 23/04/2023
Location Hiroshima
In 08:00
Out 18:00

History buffs will want to write home Hiroshima. Despite being devastated in 1945, this Japanese city is known to all for its commitment peace – its ruin on the 6th August 1945 led to the end of the war and today, the Peace Memorial (a UNESCO World Heritage Site) , is a constant reminder of the destruction that war brings. A walk in the leafy boulevards of Peace Memorial Park brings quiet contemplation. View less

The Flames of Peace – set in the park’s central feature pond – burn brightly and will continue to do so until all the nuclear bombs I the world have been destroyed. There are many other inspiring messages of hope around the city too; the Children’s’ Peace Monument just north of the park is a homage to little Sadako Sasaki, who was just two in 1945. When she developed leukemia in 1956, she believed that if she folded 1,000 paper cranes – a symbol of longevity and happiness in Japan – she would recover. Sadly she died before she finished her task but her classmates finished the rest. If you are lucky enough to visit during the unpredictable and short-lived Sakura (cherry blossom) season, then the extraordinary sight of the delicate pink blossom floating across the water to the red gate, means you can consider yourself one of the luckiest people on the planet.

Date 24/04/2023
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 25/04/2023
Location Incheon (Seoul)
In 13:00
Out

The bright lights of neighbouring big city Seoul might burn brightly but Incheon, just 27 kilometres away, has nothing to be ashamed of. The coastal city was the first to open its borders to the world in 1883, and as such has always enjoyed a special relationship with the west. So much so that it was granted “English Status” in 2007, with many residents priding themselves on their command of the language. View less

The city’s love of English has made it a business powerhouse so expect soaring skyscrapers and smart technology as part of the landscape. Incheon was also the first to welcome the Chinese and today the city’s Chinatown is one of the most vibrant and welcoming there is. A frenetic and exciting hybrid of Chinese and Korean heritage, it is said that Jjajangmyeon (black soy bean noodles), South Korea’s de facto national dish originates from here. Try a steaming bowl from one of the many vendors, then walk it off with the short 15-minute stroll from Chinatown to the traditional Sinpo Market for different kind of sensational feast. The city is steeped in history, notably in recent times during the Korean War. In 1950, the US general General MacArthur led UN forces behind enemy lines in freeing the city from North Korean pressure. MacArthur’s victory is commemorated by a statue in the Jaya (Freedom) Park. The city’s history of course goes back much further, with the first historical record dating as far back as 475 CE. At the time the city was called Michuhol, only changing its name to Incheon in 1413.

Date 26/04/2023
Location Incheon (Seoul)
In
Out 19:00

The bright lights of neighbouring big city Seoul might burn brightly but Incheon, just 27 kilometres away, has nothing to be ashamed of. The coastal city was the first to open its borders to the world in 1883, and as such has always enjoyed a special relationship with the west. So much so that it was granted “English Status” in 2007, with many residents priding themselves on their command of the language. View less

The city’s love of English has made it a business powerhouse so expect soaring skyscrapers and smart technology as part of the landscape. Incheon was also the first to welcome the Chinese and today the city’s Chinatown is one of the most vibrant and welcoming there is. A frenetic and exciting hybrid of Chinese and Korean heritage, it is said that Jjajangmyeon (black soy bean noodles), South Korea’s de facto national dish originates from here. Try a steaming bowl from one of the many vendors, then walk it off with the short 15-minute stroll from Chinatown to the traditional Sinpo Market for different kind of sensational feast. The city is steeped in history, notably in recent times during the Korean War. In 1950, the US general General MacArthur led UN forces behind enemy lines in freeing the city from North Korean pressure. MacArthur’s victory is commemorated by a statue in the Jaya (Freedom) Park. The city’s history of course goes back much further, with the first historical record dating as far back as 475 CE. At the time the city was called Michuhol, only changing its name to Incheon in 1413.

Date 27/04/2023
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 28/04/2023
Location Busan
In 08:00
Out 17:00

“A tapestry of kaleidoscopic colours, intense seafood flavours, and urban beach bliss, Busan rolls across a glorious natural setting on the Korean Peninsula’s south-east. One of the largest and busiest ports in the world, 3.5 million people call South Korea’s second city home, and the amiable locals help to lend the city its quirky, offbeat outlook. A spacious, playful and cosmopolitan place, Busan is a lively, liveable city, cradled by lush mountains and endless ocean scenery.

Haedong Yonggung Temple nestles on a dramatic cliffside, just above the crumbling rocks and crashing waves of the East Sea. Dating back to 1376, the temple’s multi-storey pagoda is adorned with lions – each representing a different emotion. Elsewhere, lanterns glitter in the night sky around Mount Geumjeongsan, freshly released from the beautiful Beomeosa Temple, which was established in AD 678. The hillside shantytown of Gamcheon Culture Village has completed an improbable transformation, blossoming from a sea of makeshift homes for Korean war refugees, into a colourful explosion of creativity and curiosity. Local artists have been let loose to create interactive installations, and the entire area is now an expansive canvas for expression. Lose yourself among vibrant alleyways of flamingo-pink, lemon-yellow and baby-blue painted facades in this unique area. Sample bibimbap, fiery-hot beef and rice, from street food vendors, before relaxing on one of South Korea’s best beaches – Haeundae’s banana bend of sand. Metallic skyscrapers offer an unusual backdrop to this pristine expanse of golden powder and are mirrored by elaborate sandcastles and sculptures during the annual sand festival – when spontaneous water fights and firework displays also take place. Gwangalli beach is another urban option, laying out spectacular views of the reaching Gwangan Bridge – the country’s second largest bridge. At night, 16,000 bulbs bathe this engineering marvel in colour.”

Date 29/04/2023
Location Sokcho
In 09:00
Out 19:00
Date 30/04/2023
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 01/05/2023
Location Akita
In 08:00
Out 18:00

Say the word Akita and you would be forgiven for thinking immediately of the lovable dog of the same name. But in fact, visitors to Akita will be treated not to a friendly furry face, rather to a beautiful city located on the northern tip of the island, around 500 km north of Tokyo. Lucky visitors will arrive in time for the superb sakura (cherry blossom), and surely there can be no sight more lovely than the elegant dip of the cherry trees alongside ancient Samurai residences.

Akita is also home to a 2km tunnel of blossoming trees that run along the banks of the Hinokinai River, which is said to “bring a grown man to his knees and weep at its beauty”. If to you, Japan is synonymous with peace and serenity, then a trip to one of the onsens is a superb bucket list experience. Buses and taxis are easily available in the centre of town that will take you to Mizusawa, Oyu and Oyasukyo hot springs, some of the loveliest onsens in the country. Some of the superb sights in Akita are: Senshu Park, on the former site of Kubota Castle, the elegant red-brick folk Museum (housing works by block printer Katsuhira Tokushi (1907-1971) and metalwork by Sekiya Shiro (1907-1994) and the Old Kaneko Family Home. The Akita Museum of Art opened in 2012 and is home to the largest canvas painting in the world, Events of Atika, by Foujita (1886-1968). The painting measures a staggering 3.65 x 20.5 m (12 x 67 ft). The Museum also has many works by European masters such as Goya, Rubens, Rembrandt and Picasso.

Date 02/05/2023
Location Aomori
In 08:00
Out 23:00

From fiery festivals to spectacular mountain scenery, soaring temples to castles surrounded by cherry blossom blooms, Aomori is one of Japan’s most enchanting destinations. Framed by dark peaks clad with dense forestry, the city enjoys a picturesque location on Japan’s main island Honshu. While there are gorgeous pink tinted parks, tiered castles and towering Buddha statues to explore, the Aomori Prefecture’s capital is perhaps best known for the summer festival of fire that lights it up each year.

Lavish illuminated floats fill the streets during Nebuta Matsuri festival, as dancing locals wave flickering lanterns through the night sky – and drummers pound out pulsating rhythms. Nebuta Matsuri has a euphoric and energetic atmosphere which makes it stand out as an unmissable experience compared with some of Japan’s more restrained festivals. At other times of the year, places like the stunning Hirosaki Castle bloom with rose-pink cherry blossom, as spring’s sunshine clears away winter’s plentiful snowfall. The castle’s moat, glowing with the pale hue of fallen blossom, is a truly mesmerising sight to behold. Don’t worry if you’re too late though, you might be able to catch the pink-flush of the apple blossom – which comes slightly later. Extraordinary prehistoric Jomon period history is waiting to be unearthed at the living archaeological site, Sannai-Maruyama Ruins. Or, the untouched wilderness of UNESCO World Heritage Site Shirakami Sanchi is within reach. This sprawling mass of beech trees covers a third of the Shirakami mountain range, and the dense forestry once blanketed the majority of northern Japan’s land. Visit to scratch the surface of this untamed landscape’s beauty and see sprawling waterfalls cascading down mountainsides, in a beautiful off-bounds landscape, where black bears roam freely.

Date 03/05/2023
Location Hakodate
In 08:00
Out 18:00

Gaze down over Hakodate, from the heights of its namesake peak – Mount Hakodate – to see the city stretching out spectacularly, with back-to-back twin bays splitting the ocean. Hakodate port was one of the first to open Japan up to the world, and to international trade in 1859 – a fact reflected in the architecture, with its influences from the West and beyond. The port area is a redbrick wash of warehouses turned shopping malls, all observed by the onion domes of the city’s Russian Orthodox church.

Date 04/05/2023
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 05/05/2023
Location Tokyo
In 08:00
Out

Dense and delightful, there’s nowhere else like Japan’s kinetic capital – a city where ancient traditions blend seamlessly with a relentless pursuit for the future’s sharpest edge. See the city from above, as elevators rocket you up to towering viewing platforms, from which you can survey a vast urban ocean, interspersed with sky-scraping needles. Look out as far as the distant loom of Mount Fuji’s cone on clear days. View less

Futuristic – second-accurate – transport seamlessly links Tokyo’s 14 districts, while the glow of flashing advertisement boards, clanks of arcade machines, and waves of humanity flowing along its streets, adds to the sense of mesmerising, dizzying and glorious sensory overload. One of Tokyo’s most iconic sights, don’t miss the flood of people scrambling to cross Shibuya’s famous intersection. Join the choreographed dance, as crowds of briefcase-carrying commuters are given the green light to cross at the same time – bathed in the light of massive neon advertisements. The culture is immensely rich and deep, with 7th-century, lantern-decorated temples, stunning palaces and tranquil scarlet shrines waiting below cloaks of incense and nestling between soaring skyscrapers. Restaurants serve up precisely prepared sushi, and wafer-thin seafood slivers, offering a unique taste of the country’s refined cuisine. Settle into traditional teahouses, to witness intricate ceremonies, or join the locals as they fill out karaoke bars to sing the night away. In the spring, cherry blossom paints a delicate pink sheen over the city’s innumerable parks and gardens.

Date 06/05/2023
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 07/05/2023
Location Miyakojima
In 08:00
Out 18:00

Set on the eastern coast in Japan’s Iwate prefecture, Miyako promises stunning scenery and Jorman history in equimeasure. The coastal city of around 50,000 inhabitants is around 600 km from Tokyo, but boasts one of the finest beaches in Japan, as well as a treasure trove of succulently fresh seafood restaurants. While travellers to Miyako might arrive expecting the usual amalgam of cultural attractions and high tech wizardry, they will leave with memories of one of the greatest garden cities they have ever experienced. View less

During the Edo period (1603-1868) the town was considered as Japan’s main seaport. Today this is no longer the case, perhaps due to Miyako’s precarious placement and underwater seismic activity; four tsunamis have engulfed the city since 1700, with waves reaching almost 40 metres in some cases. Thus, local attractions tend to be of the natural kind, as historical building have been all but wiped out. Luckily, Mother Nature really does come into her own in Miyako. The city is bordered by the Sanriku Fukkō National Park, one of the National Parks of Japan. Sanriku Fukkō stretches for 180 km along the coast and homes a wonderful variety of flora and fauna, including groves of Japanese red pine, rhododendrons and Rosa rugosa. Numerous bird species, including the black-tailed gull and shearwater call the park home. What’s more, bird lovers will undoubted love that the nearby Hidejima Island and Sanganjima Island are the only breeding grounds in Japan for the band-rumped storm-petrel.

Date 08/05/2023
Location Hakodate
In 08:00
Out 17:00

Gaze down over Hakodate, from the heights of its namesake peak – Mount Hakodate – to see the city stretching out spectacularly, with back-to-back twin bays splitting the ocean. Hakodate port was one of the first to open Japan up to the world, and to international trade in 1859 – a fact reflected in the architecture, with its influences from the West and beyond. The port area is a redbrick wash of warehouses turned shopping malls, all observed by the onion domes of the city’s Russian Orthodox church. View less

Elsewhere, the star-shaped Goryokaku fortress glows with natural colours and a beautiful haze of cherry blossom during the season. Goryokaku Tower, which rises up beside it, offers a sweeping bird’s eye view of the green fortress and mountain backdrop. Buses trundle up the 335-metre incline to the top of Mount Hakodate, but the best way to reach the views is to jump on the ropeway, which swings high above downtown’s buildings, over a carpet of pine trees. Head up to the mountain’s heights as sunset approaches. With darkness sweeping in, and the lights flickering to life, the panorama is one of Japan’s most spectacular. Soak it all in, and look out to the horizon, dotted with the shimmering lights of ships hauling in harvests of the city’s renowned squid. The plankton-rich waters attract a delicious variety of feasting sea life to Hakodate’s coast, which is then plated up in the city’s numerous, skilled restaurants. For an eye-opening, whirring morning, see the freshest produce being doled out at Hakodate Morning Market – amid a cacophony of noise and activity.

Date 09/05/2023
Location Kushiro
In 08:00
Out 17:00

Surrounded by spectacular national parks – and sheltered from the majority of winter’s ice, Kushiro is one of northern Japan’s most important cities. A deep-sea fishing port that specialises in Pacific saury, Kushiro hugs the coastline of the most northerly of Japan’s major islands. See the riches plundered from the ocean at the busy Washo Fish Market, dive into the native Ainu culture, or head out to explore the immersive beauty of Japan’s largest wetlands. View less

Kushiro City Museum is an imposing, castle-like structure, but there’s a warm welcome waiting inside, where exhibitions showcase the area’s history, and the extraordinary animals that you can meet on your adventures here. Explore Japan’s wilder side at the vast wildlife oasis that is Kushiro Marshland. A world away from the country’s urban metropolises, look out for the tanchō-zuru red-crowned cranes, which are some of the world’s rarest, and a revered symbol of luck and longevity. Spot pairs of the elegant birds, as they dance together on the plains of the wetlands. Head out to Lake Akan – in Akan National park – to see another side to the area’s landscapes and encounter the bizarre marimo moss. Growing here only, it forms large, perfectly manicured bowling balls. Hot mud pools also burble, while the cone of the volcanic Mount Oakan watches over the area, echoing Mount Fuji’s symmetrical splendour. Ainu Kotan is close by, and you can visit to experience the authentic culture of northern Japan’s native people.

Date 10/05/2023
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 11/05/2023
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 12/05/2023
Location Petropavlovsk
In 07:00
Out 20:00

Majestic volcanoes and stacked mountains layer Petropavlovsk Kamchatsky with one of the world’s most epic backdrops. A business-like city of everyday life, set amid this utterly extraordinary scenery, Petropavlovsk Kamchatsky is a staggering visit to a land where volcanoes churn, geysers spurt, and geothermic pools simmer. Glaciers slowly carve out magnificent valleys, while the meltwater fuels roaring rivers, rapids and waterfalls. A far easterly outpost, cut off from the rest of the world’s road network, the only way in and out is via sea or air. View less

Located on the Pacific Ring of Fire, there is no shortage of natural spectacles and amazing scenery to enjoy – with lively geothermal displays, and colossal forces plotting below the earth’s surface. No fewer than 29 active volcanoes brood in this stunning wilderness, while dozens more extinct ones punctuate its skies. It’s hard to prepare for the beauty of Avacha Bay – as you’re welcomed by the three claw-like rocks of the Tri Brata formations, and spot sea lions yawning on the bay. Admire the Koryaksky volcano – a perfectly formed cone of snow, and a mighty volcano that last erupted in 2008. You may still see wisps of smoke emanating from its towering peak. Look out for the bright yellow beak of the Steller’s sea eagles, the biggest and heaviest eagles in the world. The waters, teeming with Pacific salmon, draw keen anglers here, in the hopes of landing the big one. Elsewhere, the wondrous Kamchatka Valley of Geysers is a choreographed natural demonstration of power, with plumes of mist firing up into the sky along its expanse.

Date 13/05/2023
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 13/05/2023
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 14/05/2023
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 15/05/2023
Location Dutch Harbor
In 08:00
Out 14:00

With Bald Eagles soaring overhead, emerald-green volcanic peaks chafing the clouds, and raw ocean scenery as far as the eye can see, this far-flung destination is the definition of remote and wild. Part of the outlying Aleutian Islands archipelago, which spirals out across the Bering Sea into the wilds of the Pacific, Dutch Harbor offers a dramatic backdrop and rich military history – as one of the few pieces of US soil to be directly attacked by the Japanese during World War II.

The town settles into the embrace of a vast deepwater harbour, which helps to protect from the unpredictable churn of the Bering Sea. Enjoy hikes along coastal trails to birdwatch among more than 100 different species – and look on as huge clouds of cawing seabirds float on gusts of wind, filling the air with their raucous calls. Dutch Harbor is famous for its crab fishing industry – a dangerous, challenging pursuit – and the town is well known to many Americans as the setting of the television show Deadliest Catch. The Aleutian WWII Visitor Center and the Museum of the Aleutians provide extensive information on WWII in the Aleutians, prehistory, the Russian period, Unangan (Aleut) culture and recent history. A visible reminder of the Russian past is the Holy Ascension Cathedral, the oldest cruciform-style Russian Orthodox church in North America and a National Historic Landmark.

Date 16/05/2023
Location At Sea
In
Out
Date 17/05/2023
Location Kodiak
In 08:00
Out 18:00

The domain of grizzlies, brown and black bears, Kodiak Island is a raw, wild, and utterly authentic Alaskan wilderness. The Emerald Isle is the USA’s second-largest island, and with a wilderness stretching out over 3,670 square miles, it’s a thrilling voyage into the Alaskan unknown. The weather may get a little cloudy at times, but the locals actively welcome a covering of cloud – perhaps partly because the clouds and fog are said to have deterred Japanese attacks during World War II’s hostilities. View less

Be sure to bring your camera with you; it’s nigh on impossible to take a bad photo of these irresistible vistas – and you’ll quickly see why Kodiak Island is the destination of choice for wildlife documentary producers. Cinematic setpieces regularly play out, as eagles soar over expansive sweeps of fir-tree forested mountains and still lakes, releasing occasional piercing calls. Some of the animal kingdom’s most feared and revered creatures call Kodiak Island home, and your first sight of a bear reaching a massive paw into the water, or treading through a gently burbling stream, will live with you forever. Soar in a seaplane to track the bears with an expert guide. Masters of disguise, it often takes a trained eye to spot the bears in their natural habitats. Brush up on the skills you’ll need in advance, with a read of our bear watching blog. [Insert blog: 7 tips for bear watching in Alaska]. The waters of Kodiak Island are also home to some of the world’s most productive fishing. Try out your own skills, or accompany a seafaring fishing vessel, to witness life on the waves first-hand, as they plunder the depths of the ocean.

Date 18/05/2023
Location Seward
In 07:00
Out

Seward, founded in 1903, is named after the Secretary of State under Abraham Lincoln, William H. Seward, who endeavoured to purchase the land we know today as Alaska. It is a small, fishing village that has become a fairly busy port, due to its access to the state’s highway, something many Alaskan towns lack. It is the southernmost terminus for the Alaska Railroad and is the closet port to Anchorage for those embarking cruise ships. Anchorage is located in south central Alaska, where to the east, the Chugach Mountains serve as the backdrop for the city’s magnificent skyline. To the west are the expansive, steel-coloured waters of Cook Inlet, named after the explorer Captain James Cook who sailed into the area in 1778.
Anchorage was incorporated as a city in 1920. Though steadily growing, it remained a relatively small frontier town until the beginning of World War II. When the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor, Anchorage found itself on the front lines of the conflict. Airfields, roads, and other buildings were constructed during the war. After World War II, the infrastructure was left behind, creating the framework for Anchorage’s development. On January 3, 1959, Congress voted Alaska into statehood.

Searching for the latest prices…

*

Chat Online

Click the live chat icon to speak with an agent today

Request a Callback

Let us call you back at a time to suit you. » Request a callback now.

Join the Cruise Club

Sign up today and join the UK’s favourite Cruise Club. » Join the Cruise Club.

Find a Cruise

Search 1000s of cruises for your next holiday. » Search for a cruise.

Enquire Now

Enquire Now

Please call 01246 819 819 to book this cruise