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Food Quality

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This year we have been on Azura in the Caribbean, Britannia in the Bay of Biscay and Ventura for Potygal, Spain and Morrocco.

What we noticed on all was the lower quality of the food served but on Ventura this was combined with it only being served warm rather than hot. On a 14 day cruise only three dinners could be classed as hot.

Informed the Maitre D but without response or apparent action this seemed a waste of time. 

Anyone else noticed this trend (presumably to save money)

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We have found the mdr very hit and miss although the buffet has always been good. Speciality resturants have been better but, I must say, hardly worth the extra charge as it is only providing meals to the standard that should be provided throughout the ship.

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Guest Solent Richard

This year we have been on Azura in the Caribbean, Britannia in the Bay of Biscay and Ventura for Potygal, Spain and Morrocco.

What we noticed on all was the lower quality of the food served but on Ventura this was combined with it only being served warm rather than hot. On a 14 day cruise only three dinners could be classed as hot.

Informed the Maitre D but without response or apparent action this seemed a waste of time. 

Anyone else noticed this trend (presumably to save money)

 

Good morning Geoff.

 

Actually I haven't, noticed the trend that is, though this year I have only sailed with P&O once, on Britannia's maiden cruise.

 

What would you say is the root cause of only three out of 14 dinners being hot?

 

I mean to say, that shouldn't have anything to do with food quality (saving money). Surely if it was the case then that would be categorised as 'service'.

 

As a matter of course, as a retired restaurant owner, I always touch my plate when it is placed in front of me. A hot or warm plate is always a good indicator.

 

Look forward to the discussion, I love talking about food: it's a passion of mine.

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Guest Solent Richard

We have found the mdr very hit and miss although the buffet has always been good. Speciality resturants have been better but, I must say, hardly worth the extra charge as it is only providing meals to the standard that should be provided throughout the ship.

 

Hi Cap'n.

 

The joy and advantage of the speciality restaurants is that they are catering for vastly smaller numbers than the Main Restaurants.

 

Service is slicker and generally the cuts of meat are of superior quality.

 

One reason why I prefer travelling Grills with Cunard and they aren't a speciality restaurant, just smaller and more personal.

 

But of course, like speciality restaurants, you do pay more for the Grills.

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This year we have been on Azura in the Caribbean, Britannia in the Bay of Biscay and Ventura for Potygal, Spain and Morrocco.

What we noticed on all was the lower quality of the food served but on Ventura this was combined with it only being served warm rather than hot. On a 14 day cruise only three dinners could be classed as hot.

Informed the Maitre D but without response or apparent action this seemed a waste of time. 

Anyone else noticed this trend (presumably to save money)

Actually we have had the opposite experience,we have sailed twice this year with P&O Aurora and Oceana at every meal time we were always warned by our waiter to be careful as the plates where HOT and he was certainly right it was as though they had just come out of a kiln,so obviously the food was always piping HOT.wink.png

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I was on Azura for 14 nights a couple of months ago and the food left a lot to be desired. Luke warm, dry tough meat, tasteless vegetables and gravy with a skin on it where it has been kept warm. The problem for me has arisen since the introduction of plated meals. Prior to this when vegetables were served from the salver and you could pour your own gravy everything appeared fresh. Now it is plated and then kept 'warm' until required. One dish served to me I was able to hold the plate at 45 degrees and nothing moved as the solid gravy kept it in place. Yes you can go to speciality restaurants and get reasonable meals but why should you as a matter of routine have to spend extra money just because the MDR is not up to the job. As always, just my opinion.

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Oh dear OWT that doesnt sound good unless your in rough seas then at least its not in your lap, It is a few years since I've been on P&O but I had a similar expereince on Royal Caribbean ( although I think Amercian ships don't serve piping hot in a bit to not be sued by someone who maybe burns their tongue!!)

Dining has always been one of the expereinces to enjoy so if this doesnt go to plan I'm sure it could spoil peoples cruise

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I think it helps if you get a good team of waiters, we have had problems in the past where meals have obviously been plated up for a while and not at all appetizing. But at other times we have had waiters who always bring the food hot and in good condition. I sometimes wonder if some choose the best meals for their customers and others just don't bother. We were on the same cruise as OWT and our meals arrived hot and fresh. We had a cruise a few years ago where every meal arrived just warm and dried up but other  passengers on the same cruise said their meals were always fresh and hot.

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Guest Solent Richard

Food of course can be very subjective. 

 

One man's meat is another man's poison...or should that be poisson?

 

biggrin.png biggrin.png

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Good morning Geoff.

 

Actually I haven't, noticed the trend that is, though this year I have only sailed with P&O once, on Britannia's maiden cruise.

 

What would you say is the root cause of only three out of 14 dinners being hot?

 

I mean to say, that shouldn't have anything to do with food quality (saving money). Surely if it was the case then that would be categorised as 'service'.

 

As a matter of course, as a retired restaurant owner, I always touch my plate when it is placed in front of me. A hot or warm plate is always a good indicator.

 

Look forward to the discussion, I love talking about food: it's a passion of mine.

I tend to think that if the wine is served in an ice bucket without asking, it is a good indicator of the food to follow.

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I think its a nice experience to go to a speciality restaurant.  Not because its a 'better' restaurant but because its a different dining experience

Always thought that different was one of the positives of the MDR, much more vibrant than the average restaurant and provided the company was alright more convivial.

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That's good to hear Ron. Maybe they are taking complaints seriously as when we were on Arcadia in September for three and a half weeks most nights the food was far from hot.

Yet when we were on her in October for 32 nights only one meal had to be sent back because it was cold, otherwise superb

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My wife and I have taken over 12 P and O cruises over the past 6 years  and while in the early years we raved about the quality of food that is no longer the case. Buffet food is extremely poor and the food in the main dining room leaves a lot to be desired. In my view this has nothing to do with a plated service, it is the quality of the food and in some cases the cooking which is the cause.For example on a number of occasions I have had a grilled chicken breast or steak which was dry and tough as old boots and grilled salmon which was way overcooked. These are 3 simple dishes which any half decent chef should be able to cook properly providing the ingredients are of a good quality.My wife and I are now seriously considering cruising with another line.

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Guest Solent Richard

Food of course can be very subjective. 

 

One man's meat is another man's poison...or should that be poisson?

 

biggrin.png biggrin.png

 

Well I made the above comment over a month ago and my view hasn't changed.

 

Perhaps when using the proverbial 'broad brush' to chastise some cruise food as 'poor' quality wouldn't it be good to hear exactly what characteristics of the meal deemed it to be 'poor'.

 

In fact I'd be interested to hear how members rate food 'quality'.

 

I'll start the ball rolling.

 

The vast majority of food - meats and fish - served on cruise ships has been frozen before it comes onboard.

 

I normally judge my food on a plate by three criteria - taste, colour and texture.

 

Freezing food by its very nature affects the latter of those three. The texture is degraded and the blood and natural juices are also degraded, often lost.

 

Food for thought?

 

9493127997_29ee1565c7_z.jpg

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