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Captain Kidd II

Is cruising suitable for all?

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I know this is going to cause comment but .....” having just disembarked from P&O Aurora the thing that particularly struck home to me was not only the average age of the passengers but their inability to move round the ship, manage to do things themselves and complete disrespect for fellow passengers. 

The Crow’s Nest in the morning was akin to the nursing/care home my mother was in prior to her death with many catching up on sleep, mouths open, whilst others painted etc. A friend of mine suggested the ship should be renamed Age Concern!

Entertainment was most suitable for the more elderly and, as many were though of as in need of early beds, the turn down in the cabins had been stopped as so many were tucked up before the cabin steward could do their rounds.

It appears that the focus is now firmly on the family friendly, larger, ships for entertainment rather then Adult only as the “young passengers” prefer these. With the way P&O are managing these smaller ships it will be a self fulfilling prophecy that they will either replace Saga as first choice for the infirmed or just  be sold off.

Rant over but I really am asking myself if I want to go on 2 further cruises on that ship which was so close to our hearts.

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Oh dear, I can see your point, yes our cruise in June on Aurora I was uncomfortable with the amounts of deaths, and hospitalion that went on.

some passengers from embarkation hall looked unwell, I wonder then if some should be going away.

only my opinion as usual, and have sympathy with people who suffer chronic illness

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I hope your post was mainly tongue in cheek as without cruising from a UK port my wife, who is almost a full time wheelchair user and unable to fly, and I would be unable to have any overseas holidays.

I appreciate that for the fully able bodied this demographic might result in a less than satisfactory cruise experience, but surely you would not deny anyone the right to have a cruise just because they are old or infirm.

Edited by towny44

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7 hours ago, towny44 said:

I hope your post was mainly tongue in cheek as without cruising from a UK port my wife, who is almost a full time wheelchair user and unable to fly, and I would be unable to have any overseas holidays.

I appreciate that for the fully able bodied this demographic might result in a less than satisfactory cruise experience, but surely you would not deny anyone the right to have a cruise just because they are old or infirm.

I would never deny disabled or less fortunate than me the pleasure of cruising. My whole point is that it would appear that Aurora is now geared up for a certain area of the travel market to such an extent that loyal travellers of a younger age (we are both retired) consider it is no longer suitable for there needs. I know it is our choice but from our most recent experience we are seriously looking at cancelling 2 cruises currently booked on the ship as are several if our friends.

We may be retired but do not wish to feel that we have effectively signed up for weeks on end in a care home.

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We catch the coach to get to our cruises and often the coach is used to pick up for two cruises(P& O) but on couple who were going on a World cruise could hardly get on the coach, god only knows how the managed on the ship, never did find out if they made it back?

But Cruising is open to all ages and abilities ,the newer ships are far better equipped to handle those with disabilities, and from my own experience the cruise lines offer help getting on and off the ship if needed....Davybe

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I guess the adult-only ships are always likely to have a higher age demographic, but of course as the population ages I suppose it is logical that cruise pax may also get older. I generally cruise on P&O's adult-only ships and whilst I am always at the younger end of the age spectrum it has never bothered me.  It does of course remain to be seen what direction the entertainment etc. goes in.  I have sailed once with Saga, where the age demographic was even higher but most of the pax were pretty sprightly - even if they needed a walking aid of some sort!

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On 8/18/2019 at 1:08 PM, Captain Kidd II said:

the thing that particularly struck home to me was not only the average age of the passengers but their inability to move round the ship, manage to do things themselves

Haven't experienced this with Azamara, Silversea, Cruise and Maritime, Saga or even Fred Olsen who definitely cater for the older generation. 

Having a severely disabled teenage granddaughter who is in a wheelchair I appreciate that for some, cruising is their only perceived way of holidaying overseas but I do wonder how these people would get on in a real emergency such as Concordia. 

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I know just how you feel Captain Kidd 11, we felt that Aurora was looking more like a care home. I don’t have a problem with wheelchairs and understand that they are needed by some people. It is not the wheelchair uses that are the problem but those who do not understand  their limits and are in denial of their capabilities. 

It is like seeing a driver struggle to get out of the car in order to fill it with fuel. They should not be driving 

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14 hours ago, Oldworldtraveller said:

I do wonder how these people would get on in a real emergency such as Concordia. 

This may sound slightly controversial OWT and is not aimed at genuine people, but I'm convinced many of those who use mobility scooters etc don't actually need them.

In an emergency I suspect quite a few of those who scoot around on scooters etc whilst onboard would be at the muster station before me (without the scooter)!!!

Two recent incidents added to my suspicions, one women using a walking frame which must of been a ploy to get airport assistance as once she boarded the ship she was fine and no frame every time I saw her during the cruise, another whilst onboard using a scooter but could be seen happily dancing whilst Inebriated most nights without a care in the world as it seems.

Just to reiterate my views are not aimed at those with genuine disabilities but those who take the **ss.

HLM.

 

 

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3 hours ago, HLM said:

This may sound slightly controversial OWT and is not aimed at genuine people, but I'm convinced many of those who use mobility scooters etc don't actually need them.

In an emergency I suspect quite a few of those who scoot around on scooters etc whilst onboard would be at the muster station before me (without the scooter)!!!

Two recent incidents added to my suspicions, one women using a walking frame which must of been a ploy to get airport assistance as once she boarded the ship she was fine and no frame every time I saw her during the cruise, another whilst onboard using a scooter but could be seen happily dancing whilst Inebriated most nights without a care in the world as it seems.

Just to reiterate my views are not aimed at those with genuine disabilities but those who take the **ss.

HLM.

 

 

There may be some who don't desperately need a scooter, but take one because they cannot walk very far, however it is a lot of effort to take one from home, or very costly, to hire one for the cruise, so I doubt that many scooter users are cheating. But I suspect that some lightweight folding wheelchair users might well be just trying to seek priority status, however as wheelchair users I can vouch that priorities are few and far between, except on RCI group ships.

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I am sure that you will prove me wrong, but why should a wheelchair user have priority, I can’t understand why they can’t wait there turn like everybody else. On a tour bus in Boston USA the whole bus of passengers had to wait for 3 wheelchairs users to get of the bus first. If I was in a chair I would have expected to get of last and not hold up the majority. 

Once on a cruise both Man and Wife each had an electric scooter they showed no concern for other passengers and would drive around at great speed, expecting everybody to move out of their way. One passenger commented that he would like to put a £10 note on the deck and see who would get off the scooter first in order to pick up the money.

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6 hours ago, towny44 said:

There may be some who don't desperately need a scooter, but take one because they cannot walk very far, however it is a lot of effort to take one from home, or very costly, to hire one for the cruise, so I doubt that many scooter users are cheating. But I suspect that some lightweight folding wheelchair users might well be just trying to seek priority status, however as wheelchair users I can vouch that priorities are few and far between, except on RCI group ships.

As I said Towny not aimed at genuine people, but of the few who were using walking aids etc on my recent cruise two clearly didn't actually need them, hence my scepticism.

HLM.

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17 hours ago, HLM said:

As I said Towny not aimed at genuine people, but of the few who were using walking aids etc on my recent cruise two clearly didn't actually need them, hence my scepticism.

HLM.

I should think we have all seen the"Fake Limper's ", we had a Family who walked unaided around the ship until we were due to get off ,when 4 out off the 5 needed wheelchairs to get them to the coaches.

Not funny for my wife but we were in Lisbon and she stubbed her toe (Thought she Broke it ) we got back to the ship and in the lift this old man wheeled his wife over her damaged toe, not a word out of him ,took ages for the bruising to go.....Davybe

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18 hours ago, Countrygirl said:

I am sure that you will prove me wrong, but why should a wheelchair user have priority, I can’t understand why they can’t wait there turn like everybody else. On a tour bus in Boston USA the whole bus of passengers had to wait for 3 wheelchairs users to get of the bus first. If I was in a chair I would have expected to get of last and not hold up the majority. 

Once on a cruise both Man and Wife each had an electric scooter they showed no concern for other passengers and would drive around at great speed, expecting everybody to move out of their way. One passenger commented that he would like to put a £10 note on the deck and see who would get off the scooter first in order to pick up the money.

I agree if my wife could tackle coach steps then we would certainly wait for the AB passengers to alight before we did, knowing how slowly she moves.

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17 minutes ago, Davybe said:

I should think we have all seen the"Fake Limper's ", we had a Family who walked unaided around the ship until we were due to get off ,when 4 out off the 5 needed wheelchairs to get them to the coaches.

Not funny for my wife but we were in Lisbon and she stubbed her toe (Thought she Broke it ) we got back to the ship and in the lift this old man wheeled his wife over her damaged toe, not a word out of him ,took ages for the bruising to go.....Davybe

Davybe, I sympathise with your wife, however as someone who regularly pushes a wheelchair can I say that it is very difficult to see the front wheels because the footrests block your view. I rely heavily on my wife to warn me if I am too close to someone in front, however if you are in a lift and a wheelchair user gets in, can I advise that rather than everyone sticking to the back wall as if their life depended on it, they move aside, because a lot of lifts are only just deep enough to take a wheelchair and its attendant.

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2 hours ago, towny44 said:

Davybe, I sympathise with your wife, however as someone who regularly pushes a wheelchair can I say that it is very difficult to see the front wheels because the footrests block your view. I rely heavily on my wife to warn me if I am too close to someone in front, however if you are in a lift and a wheelchair user gets in, can I advise that rather than everyone sticking to the back wall as if their life depended on it, they move aside, because a lot of lifts are only just deep enough to take a wheelchair and its attendant.

She was stood at the side the old bloke turned the wheelchair in the lift not going straight out then turning? we all survived ...Davybe

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On 8/20/2019 at 3:25 PM, Countrygirl said:

I am sure that you will prove me wrong, but why should a wheelchair user have priority, I can’t understand why they can’t wait there turn like everybody else. On a tour bus in Boston USA the whole bus of passengers had to wait for 3 wheelchairs users to get of the bus first. If I was in a chair I would have expected to get of last and not hold up the majority. 

Once on a cruise both Man and Wife each had an electric scooter they showed no concern for other passengers and would drive around at great speed, expecting everybody to move out of their way. One passenger commented that he would like to put a £10 note on the deck and see who would get off the scooter first in order to pick up the money.

This reminds me of a tour I did several cruises ago. There was an elderly couple sat on the fron seats. At every stop the gentleman stood up, blocking the exit, whilst his wife slowly shuffled off the seat, and was assisted down the steps. The whole coach load of passengers was held up. There was another door near the rear but the driver wouldn't open it as it was "only for emergencies".  I think we must of lost at least five mins at every stop. Quite a chunk of a 15 min photo stop. 

I don't know how the wife felt but I would have been embarrassed to hold everyone up. 

I have never understood why wheelchair users should have priority either. Due consideration and understanding to their difficulties, yes. But priority I never understood. 

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We were with my Nephew who was a wheelchair user and that's to the thoughtless selfish old people had to shuffle down the coach to get a seat when we went to Rome. we were last off and we were limited due to his wheel chair as to where we could go, anyway we were in the underground car park and used the moving walkway to get him back to the pick up area, we were overtook by one old girl who was sat in the front seats claiming disability, sprinted past us going up hill to make sure she got her front seat, she got quite a few moments from other passengers....Davybe

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